John Antczak / AP

NWS Says It’s Not In A Heat Wave, But High Temps Still Taking A Toll

Technically we’re not in a heat wave, yet. National Weather Service officials in Pittsburgh said that’s because, in Moon Township where their office is located, the temperature has not hit 90 degrees for at least three days in a row.
Read More
Matt Rourke / AP

The Republican nominee for state attorney general is drawing drew sharp lines between himself and current office-holder, Kathleen Kane.

In a speech Monday, State Senator John Rafferty, a former deputy attorney general, touted himself as the only candidate who won’t use the office as a political stepping stone.

“I’m unique in that fashion,” Rafferty said. “I’m one of the few attorney generals and the only candidate that has said I’m staying…That’s how important I believe this office is.”

Verizon is buying Yahoo for $4.8 billion, acquiring its "core Internet assets" — search, email, finance, news, sports, Tumblr, Flickr — in essence writing the final chapter of one of the longest-running Internet companies.

John Antczak / AP

Technically we’re not in a heat wave, yet.  

National Weather Service officials in Pittsburgh said that’s because, in Moon Township where their office is located, the temperature has not hit 90 degrees for at least three days in a row.

Matt Nemeth / 90.5 WESA

  The Pittsburgh Department of City Planning will hold its third and final public meeting on its new Bike Plan on Monday. The new Bike plan replaces the 1999 version and will set the agenda for Pittsburgh’s biking infrastructure, events and education initiatives.

Bike Pittsburgh Advocacy Director Eric Boerer attended one of two previous meetings, which he said included maps where residents could mark areas that they'd like to see become safer and more accessible for cyclists.

Boerer said these simple displays are useful in identifying priorities.

The International Olympic Committee has announced that it will not impose a blanket ban on the entire Russian team from the upcoming Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro despite evidence of state-sponsored doping.

Instead, it has called on sports federations to carry out assessments on individual athletes to determine whether they can compete.

The decision is an attempt to balance "the desire and need for collective responsibility versus the right to individual justice of every individual athlete," IOC President Thomas Bach said in a teleconference with reporters on Sunday.

On the day she was killed, Alexsandra Moreira thought she was safe. She thought she had managed to break away and protect herself.

Her brother even escorted her to the bus station that morning to make sure she was OK on her way to work.

"When she got on the bus, my brother told her, 'If anything happens, just call me.' Ten minutes later, his phone rang and it was her. All he could hear was her screaming, pleading for help," Moreira's sister, Andreza da Silva, says.

For These Cosplayers, Geeky Costumes Are The Cat's Pajamas

Jul 23, 2016

This weekend, San Diego will be invaded by comic book characters, all 12 Doctor Who doctors and lots of Lycra. The normal sights of Comic-Con International weekend, of course. Many enthusiastic Comic-Con-goers opt to dress in cosplay — for the uninitiated, that's a mashup of the words "costume" and "play" — inserting themselves into their favorite stories.

Meanwhile, two cosplayers in Seattle are avoiding the San Diego heat, staying at home instead and refining their art.

Helping Transgender People Find Their Voice

Jul 23, 2016

When they make a transition to publicly presenting themselves as a different gender, transgender people face many challenges. Possible surgeries and hormone treatments are some of them.

Fran Beesley was still in her bathrobe early one morning in June when she emerged from her home to find a Japanese family taking photos of her flowerbeds.

She lives in a 1970s-style one-story bungalow in the rural village of Kidlington, about a 90-minute drive northwest of London. It's a quiet place. Doesn't get many visitors. Beesley is retired and cares for her invalid husband. They're both in their 70s.

Math is "contemptible and vile."

That's not from a disgruntled student. It's from a textbook.

The author, 16th century mathematician Robert Recorde, nestled the line just after his preface, table of contents and a biblical quote citing God's command to measure and number all things.

Recorde didn't believe in math's awfulness — quite the opposite. He was simply reflecting popular opinion on his way to a spirited defense of math. Why?

Pages

Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures

Mary-Louise Parker and Josh Raulerson, This Wednesday!

New Podcast Series from 90.5 WESA and David Harris

Pitt Law expert explores America's justice system; new episode every Tuesday

JazzWorks

Classic and Contemporary Jazz Streaming 24/7