The Two Way

The Two-Way
4:33 am
Sun March 24, 2013

No. 1 Gonzaga's Been Dumped: Here's What Else You Should Know

Carl Hall No. 22 of the Wichita State Shockers dunks the ball in the first half while taking on the Gonzaga Bulldogs during the third round of the NCAA men's basketball tournament in Salt Lake City Saturday.
Streeter Lecka Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 7:54 am

Saturday's NCAA men's basketball shocker? Wichita State toppled Gonzaga, 76-70. Gonzaga is the first top-seeded team to be eliminated, and it's the first time Wichita State is heading to Sweet 16 since 2006, The Associated Press reports. The AP adds:

"Wichita State had the Zags down 13 early. Though Gonzaga (32-3) fought back, the barrage of 3s was too much for the small school from Spokane, Wash."

Read more
The Two-Way
7:44 pm
Sat March 23, 2013

Joe Weider, Fitness Icon And Mr. Olympia Creator, Dies At 93

Arnold Schwarzenegger raises the arm of Joe Weider, the creator of the Mr. Olympia Bodybuilding competition, during the 39th annual Mr. Olympia event in 2003. Weider died Saturday at 93.
Eric Jamison AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 3:25 pm

Joe Weider, a legendary figure in the world of bodybuilding whose name became synonymous with the sport, died Saturday at the age of 93.

Weider's publicist, Charlotte Parker, told The Associated Press that the bodybuilder, publisher and promoter died of heart failure at his home in Los Angeles' San Fernando Valley.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:13 pm
Sat March 23, 2013

Oregon's Arsalan Kazemi: From Iran To NCAA Hoopla

Rebounding machine Arsalan Kazemi is the first Iranian-born player in Divison I men's college hoops.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 3:23 pm

San Jose, Calif., is just a piece of a very big March Madness pie. But in the eight teams that gathered there for second- and third-round games this week, you could see the undeniable trend in big-time college basketball globalization.

Rosters from schools as geographically diverse as Syracuse, New Mexico State and California featured athletes from Senegal, France, Canada, South Africa, Croatia, Sudan.

But it's the University of Oregon with a groundbreaker — from Iran.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:59 am
Sat March 23, 2013

In Case You Missed It: Georgetown Upended, And Other NCAA Surprises

Florida Gulf Coast's Chase Fieler (left) and Georgetown's Mikael Hopkins leap for a rebound during a second-round game of the NCAA tournament Friday.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 1:33 pm

Another big shock from the NCAA tournament: Florida Gulf Coast "busted a load of brackets" Friday, beating second-seeded Georgetown, as The Associated Press reports.

The Florida Gulf Coast Eagles managed a 78-68 victory over the Hoyas, only the seventh time in NCAA history that a No. 15 seed beat a No. 2, the AP says.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:17 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Coal And Coral: Australia's Self-Destructive Paradox

The city of Gladstone near the Great Barrier Reef is the world's fourth largest coal-export hub. Dredges, like one seen here, have turned the harbor brown as they work to expand the coal port.
Richard Harris NPR

NPR Science Correspondent Richard Harris traveled to Australia's Great Barrier Reef to find out how the coral reefs are coping with increased water temperature and increasing ocean acidity, brought about by our burning of fossil fuels. Day 5: A return to shore finds that people prefer cars to corals.

It's not every day you open an in-flight magazine and read an ad touting "spitwater pressure cleaners for the mining industry." Flip the page and you'll also see an ad cajoling you to "snorkel, sip, snooze" on the Great Barrier Reef.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:41 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Saturday Mail Delivery: Safe For Now?

Veteran USPS letter carrier Michael McDonald gathers mail to load into his truck before making his delivery run in the East Atlanta neighborhood on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, in Atlanta.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 6:25 pm

Does the budget bill passed by Congress this week derail the United States Postal Service (USPS) plan to end Saturday delivery of first class mail?

Read more
The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

FAA Announces Tower Closures Coming In April

The control tower at Troutdale Airport in Troutdale, Ore., one of the towers slated for closure.
Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 6:22 pm

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced Friday that it will close 149 air traffic control towers from April 7 due to budget constraints. The number announced is 40 fewer than the FAA originally planned to close. The cuts in service are part of the FAA's response to sequestration, as we reported in a recent story from Arnold Palmer Regional Airport in Latrobe, Pa.:

Read more
The Two-Way
2:42 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Chinua Achebe And The Bravery Of Lions

Chinua Achebe, Nigerian-born novelist and poet speaks about his works and his life at his home on the campus of Bard College in 2008.
Craig Ruttle ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 3:30 pm

Chinua Achebe, the prominent Nigerian novelist and essayist who died on Thursday, said in a 1994 interview with the Paris Review, "There is that great proverb — that until the lions have their own historians, the history of the hunt will always glorify the hunter."

Read more
The Two-Way
1:45 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Bloomberg: Newt Gingrich, Rick Santorum Talked About A 2012 'Unity Ticket'

Presidential candidates Rick Santorum, left, Mitt Romney, center, and Newt Gingrich during a debate in February of 2012.
Don Emmert AFP/Getty Images

Yes the 2012 elections have been combed over a thousand times. But what's one more detail, right?

Today, Bloomberg reports that were it not for egos, Mitt Romney could have been toppled by a conservative "unity ticket" featuring Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum. Had the two united, there would have been a real possibility that Romney wouldn't have made it past the primary process and 2012 would have been truly different race.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:27 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Was Punxsutawney Phil Wrong? Prosecutor Says He Misrepresented Spring

Groundhog handler Ben Hughes and Punxsutawney Phil in Feb. 2011.
Jeff Swensen Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:07 pm

Here's the gist of what the most famous groundhog in the world told us on Feb. 2:

Punxsutawney Phil, the King of the Groundhogs,

Seer of Seers, Prognosticator of Prognosticators,

Weather Prophet without Peer,

was awakened from his burrow at 7:28 am

with a tap of the President's cane....

And so ye faithful,

there is no shadow to see

An early Spring for you and me.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

HBO: Programming Could Be Sold Directly Through Internet Providers

HBO chief Richard Plepler speaks in New York at a 2011 screening.
Larry Busacca Getty Images for Time Warner

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:21 pm

HBO CEO Richard Plepler is saying something a lot of the television network's fans have been waiting to hear — that its content could be offered to customers directly through their Internet service providers instead of a cable company.

Right now, HBO must be purchased through a cable provider. Plepler tells Reuters that HBO Go, an online streaming service launched by the network in 2010 (but still only available as an extra to your cable TV) might also be sold through ISPs.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Legalized Marijuana Forcing Old Dogs To Learn New Tricks

A customer rolls a joint made of half marijuana and half tobacco in Olympia, Wash., on December 9, 2012.
Nick Adams Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:07 pm

Drug-sniffing dogs, those cute bellwethers of illegal activity, are dropping Marijuana from their repertoire in Washington state.

A 2012 ballot initiative legalized the use of marijuana in the state (although federal law still prohibits its use). Since then authorities have been working to implement the law. Part of that process is, apparently, to employ canines who don't react to the smell of marijuana. The AP explains why:

Read more
The Two-Way
11:39 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Congo Warlord Faces War Crimes After Turning Himself In

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 12:42 pm

Bosco Ntaganda, a notorious warlord accused of crimes against humanity during Congo's civil war, is headed to an international court after turning himself in at the U.S. Embassy in Rwanda earlier this week.

NPR's Gregory Warner reports that the surrender of Ntaganda, nicknamed "The Terminator," came as a surprise. He's been wanted by the International Criminal Court since 2006 for crimes against humanity, including conscripting child soldiers, murder, rape and sexual slavery allegedly committed in 2002 and 2003 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:35 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Britain Goes After Pot Growers With 'Scratch And Sniff' Cards

British police and the volunteer group Crimestoppers are sending out more than 200,000 of these cards with the scent of a cannabis plant.
Courtesy of Crimestoppers

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 1:05 pm

For many years, across the world, the extraordinarily powerful noses of dogs have been successfully used to help detect crime.

Now, in Britain, moves are under way to recruit humans to perform the same subtle work.

Police are encouraging the British to step out of their homes, raise their nostrils aloft, and see if they catch the whiff of wrongdoing wafting from the next-door neighbors.

Visitors to these crowded islands are often charmed by the small redbrick terraced houses that are in every town and city.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:35 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Israel Apologizes To Turkey Over 2010 Flotilla Raid

This video image provided by the Israel Defense Force purportedly shows one of several Israeli commandos being dropped onto the Turkish-flagged ship Mavi Marmara by helicopter on May 31, 2010. A U.N. panel found that the Israeli blockade of Gaza, where the Turkish ship was headed, is legitimate, although the tactics used in the raid were "excessive and unreasonable."
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:25 am

In a phone call today with Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu apologized to Turkey over the 2010 Israeli raid of a flotilla that left nine people dead. The flotilla was attempting to break an Israeli naval blockade of Gaza, when it was intercepted by Israel.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:58 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Scientists Use Antacid To Help Measure The Rate Of Reef Growth

Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution for Science takes a water sample during his experiment out on part of the Great Barrier Reef. The water is slightly pink because his team is using a dye to trace an acid-neutralizing chemical as it flows across the reef.
Richard Harris NPR

NPR Science Correspondent Richard Harris traveled to Australia's Great Barrier Reef to find out how the coral reefs are coping with increased water temperature and increasing ocean acidity, brought about by our burning of fossil fuels. Day 4: Richard catches up with one of the gurus of climate science out on the reef.

Ken Caldeira loves a challenge, and he has a big one right under his feet. He's standing on an expanse of coral reef out in Australia's Great Barrier Reef. It's being washed with water as the tide streams over the reef, from a lagoon to the open sea.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:37 am
Fri March 22, 2013

'Endless Wreckage': Blizzard Triggers Huge Canadian Traffic Pileup

A blizzard traps cars, trucks and even a cattle car on a Canadian highway, causing dozens of mild injuries.
Derek Fildebrandt Twitter

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 11:26 am

A quick moving blizzard plowed through the central Canadian plains province of Alberta this week, triggering a massive vehicle pileup on Thursday; scores of motorists were stranded near the provincial capital of Edmonton.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:28 am
Fri March 22, 2013

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski Says He Will Step Down

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski testifies before a Senate committee in March of 2013.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:24 pm

The chairman of the Federal Communication Commission announced during a staff meeting on Friday that he intends to step down "in the coming weeks."

Julius Genachowski's resignation comes just a day after Commissioner Robert McDowell announced his plans to step down.

The New York Times reports the Obama administration has not settled on a replacement for Genachowski. It reports:

Read more
The Two-Way
9:53 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Man Arrested On US Airways Flight After Impersonating Pilot

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:59 am

A 61-year-old French man on a US Airways flight out of Philadelphia almost got an upgrade by playing pilot.

Philippe Jernnard of La Rochelle, France, had a ticket and was denied an upgrade for the West Palm Beach, Fla., flight departing Philadelphia International Airport on Wednesday. He later showed up in the cockpit jump seat wearing a white shirt with an Air France logo and a black jacket with epaulets, CBS News reports.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:28 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Harvard Stuns New Mexico, And 4 Other Need-To-Knows From The NCAA Tournament

Siyani Chambers and Laurent Rivard of the Harvard Crimson celebrate as the Crimson defeat the New Mexico Lobos 68-62 during the the 2013 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament on Thursday in Salt Lake City, Utah.
Harry How Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:34 am

The NCAA tournament got off to a stunning start on Thursday: Harvard, known more for its brains and seeded No. 14, sent No. 3 New Mexico packing with a 62-68 win.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:19 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Moscow First Stop For New Chinese Leader

Chinese President Xi Jinping lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Moscow on Friday.
Kirill Kudryavtsev AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 12:35 pm

Newly installed Chinese President Xi Jinping is following in his predecessor's footsteps by making Russia his first official trip abroad.

The visits by Xi and Hu Jintao before him (in 2003), both meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, reinforce how the Cold War rivals have grown closer as they seek to counter U.S. influence in Asia and Europe.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:29 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Chinua Achebe, Nigerian Author Of 'Things Fall Apart,' Dies

Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe in January 2009.
Abayomi Adeshida AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 1:45 pm

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports from Lagos, Nigeria, on the death of one of Africa's greatest contemporary writers. Quoting his publisher, AP, CNN, and the BBC are reporting Chinua Achebe has died.

Chinua Achebe who taught at colleges in the United States made literary history with his 1958 best-seller Things Fall Apart, a sobering tale about Nigeria at the beginning of its colonization.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:19 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Cyprus Gets Cold Shoulder From Russia On Bailout Aid

An employee of Cyprus Laiki (Popular) Bank reacts as he takes part in a protest outside Parliament on Friday in the capital, Nicosia.
Patrick Baz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 1:47 pm

As a deadline on Cyprus to come up with a financial bailout plan nears, a possible rescue from Russia looks to have fallen apart, leaving the island nation few options for staving off default.

Russian Finance Minister Anton Siluanov said as far as Moscow was concerned "the talks have ended," but Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev left the door open, saying aid from Moscow would be contingent on Cyprus gaining European Union backing for its other money-raising ideas.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:02 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Obama Closes Trip To Israel, West Bank With Memorial Visits

President Barack Obama pays his respects in the Hall of Remembrance in front of Israel's President Shimon Peres, Israel's Prime Minster Benjamin Netanyahu, Chairman of the Yad Vashem Directorate Avner Shalev and Rabbi Yisrael Meir Lau after marines layed a wreath on his behalf during his visit to the memorial on Friday.
Uriel Sinai Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:24 am

President Obama wrapped up his trip to Israel and the West Bank on Friday with visits to three symbolic pilgrimage sites: First he laid a stone on the grave of Theodor Herzl, the father of modern Zionism, then he laid a wreath and a stone on the grave of Yitzhak Rabin, the Israeli leader assassinated in 1995. Finally, Obama made a somber visit to the Holocaust memorial Yad Vashem.

Read more

Pages