The Two Way

The Two-Way
6:31 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

National Council Of La Raza Dubs Obama 'Deporter-In-Chief'

Janet Murguía, president and CEO of the National Council of La Raza.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 6:09 am

The nation's largest Latino advocacy organization is taking its gloves off against one of its traditional allies.

National Council of La Raza President Janet Murguía will call President Obama the "deporter-in-chief" during the organization's annual Capital Awards dinner on Tuesday.

It marks a shift in the position of NCLR, which has, for the most part, supported President Obama.

In an interview with NPR's All Things Considered, Murguía said the Latino community "is in crisis" and President Obama can do more to curb deportations.

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The Two-Way
6:10 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

RadioShack To Close 1,000 Stores Nationwide Amid Big Losses

People walk by a Radio Shack storefront on Tuesday in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

RadioShack said Tuesday it will close 1,100 retail stores across the country amid a disappointing fourth quarter, in a sign that the electronics retailer is ceding ever-more market share to big box stores and online providers, such as Amazon.

CEO Joseph Magnacca said the closings would leave the company with more than 4,000 U.S. stores still operating. RadioShack did not say which of its stores it planned to shutter.

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The Two-Way
5:58 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Teen Sues Parents, Claiming They Owe Her Money For College

Rachel Canning (right) sits with her friend Jaime Inglesino during a hearing Tuesday at the Morris County Courthouse in New Jersey.
John O'Boyle AP

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 11:56 am

A judge held an unusual hearing in New Jersey on Tuesday: a lawsuit brought by an 18-year-old who says her parents kicked her out of their house. Rachel Canning is seeking to force her parents to give her financial support and money for college, in addition to pay for tuition at her private school.

Superior Court Family Division Judge Peter Bogaard, who heard the case in Morristown, N.J., on Tuesday afternoon, denied Canning's requests in what's seen as the first round of hearings in the case.

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The Two-Way
5:08 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

In Photos: Carnival Around The World

Revelers dance on the street during a Carnival parade in the fishing village of Peniche, north of Lisbon, Portugal on Tuesday.
Armando Franca AP

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 6:08 am

Revelers across the globe gathered to mark the day before Ash Wednesday, which is known by several names, such as Mardi Gras, Carnival and Fat Tuesday. While parades are the most common form of celebration, a few nations indulge in some twists.

The Carnival in Ivera, Italy, includes a large battle where participants throw oranges. Some revelers in the Carnival de Binche in Belgium dress as Gilles, wearing traditional outfits accented with ostrich feathers.

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The Two-Way
4:48 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

D.C. Council Votes To Decriminalize Some Marijuana Use

Marijuana plants in Seattle.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 5:22 pm

The District of Columbia Council moved Tuesday to decriminalize some use of marijuana.

The Washington Post reports Mayor Vincent Gray said he intends to sign the bill into law, pitting the district directly against the federal government, which still considers smoking marijuana a criminal offense.

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The Two-Way
4:08 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Russian TV Host Who Slammed Moscow Says She Won't Go To Crimea

Host Abby Martin of RT America's Breaking the Set.
RT America

The Kremlin-backed Russia Today television channel says a program host who delivered a show-closing commentary denouncing Moscow's intervention in Ukraine will be sent to Crimea to "make up her own mind." But the anchor herself begs to differ.

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The Two-Way
3:30 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

'The Fact Is These Are Russian Forces,' Says Ukraine's Ambassador To U.S.

Troops under Russian command scream orders to turn back before firing warning shots at the Belbek airbase in Crimea. The troops were reacting to a large group of unarmed Ukrainian troops who approached them.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 8:17 pm

Despite what Russia's President Vladimir Putin might say, the country's approach to Ukraine is a "gross violation of international law," says Ukraine's ambassador to the U.S., Olexander Motsyk.

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The Two-Way
3:27 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Edward Snowden To Speak Via Video Link At SXSW Conference

Edward Snowden.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Edward Snowden, who is exiled in Russia, will appear via video conference at this year's South by Southwest Interactive Conference.

While Snowden has given plenty of interviews since he leaked a cache of highly-sensitive documents about the United States' surveillance programs, he has not done so live and on video.

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The Two-Way
2:35 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

WATCH: Drone Catches Video Of Stampeding Dolphins, Whale Calf

Video screen-grab of drone footage of a dolphin stampede off California coast.
Dave Anderson Capt Dave's Dolphin and Whale Safari

Dave Anderson, who runs whale-watching charters out of Dana Point, Calif., used a small camera-equipped drone to capture video of a "mega-pod" of hundreds of common dolphins as well as three gray whale migrating off the coast of San Clemente. In a separate sortie, the drone returned footage of a family of humpback whales off of Maui.

Anderson, who runs Capt Dave's Dolphin and Whale Safari produced the footage into this stunning five-minute video.

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The Two-Way
2:18 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

'12 Years A Slave' Leads To Correction Of 161-Year-Old Story

In Twelve Years A Slave, Chiwetel Ejiofor plays Solomon Northup, who was kidnapped and sold into slavery.
Jaap Buitendijk Fox Searchlight Pictures

Here's something of another victory for new media over old media.

The New York Times on Tuesday corrected a 161-year-old report about the enslavement of Solomon Northup, after a Twitter user pointed out that the story had twice misspelled Northup's name — including in the headline.

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The Two-Way
2:14 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

After 5-Decade Career, NPR's Carl Kasell Will Retire

Doby Photography NPR

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 2:33 pm

After a five-decade career in broadcasting, Carl Kasell announced his retirement on Tuesday.

Carl will record his final broadcast for Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me! this spring. He will, however, remain "scorekeeper emeritus" for the show. Before becoming the official scorekeeper for the NPR news quiz show in 1998, Carl anchored the newscast for Morning Edition.

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The Two-Way
12:49 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Virus Locked In Siberian Ice For 30,000 Years Is Revived In Lab

This electron microscope image provided by researchers shows a section of a Pithovirus particle, dark outline, inside an infected Acanthamoeba castellanii cell.
Julia Bartoli, Chantal Abergel AP

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 8:27 am

Scientists at a laboratory in France have thawed out and revived an ancient virus found in the Siberian permafrost, making it infectious again for the first time in 30,000 years.

The giant virus known as Pithovirus sibericum was discovered about 100 feet deep in coastal tundra. The pathogen infects tiny amoebas — simple, one-celled organisms.

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The Two-Way
12:48 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Obama And Kerry Criticize Russia's Actions In Ukraine

Secretary of State John Kerry speaks to religious leaders at the Shrine of the Fallen, a tribute to anti-government protesters, on Tuesday in Kiev, Ukraine.
Sergei Supinsky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 1:38 pm

Russia's explanation for its military response to the crisis in Ukraine doesn't match real events, President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry said Tuesday. Speaking at news conferences held within moments of each other on different continents, they urged Russia to de-escalate the situation.

After unveiling his 2015 budget blueprint in Washington, D.C., the president was asked about Russian President Vladimir Putin's approach to the situation in Ukraine.

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Obama's $3.9 Trillion Budget Would Produce $564 Billion Deficit

Copies of President Obama's proposed budget for fiscal 2015, after they were delivered to the Senate Budget Committee on Tuesday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 1:53 pm

As expected, President Obama on Tuesday unveiled a $3.9 trillion budget plan for fiscal 2015 that his number crunchers say would produce a $564 billion deficit.

The gap between spending and revenue, while large, would be down from more than $744 billion this fiscal year and a record $1.4 trillion in 2009 — a fiscal year that began when President George W. Bush was still in office. Since then, deficits during the Obama years have topped $1 trillion three times.

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The Two-Way
11:20 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Kentucky Won't Appeal Order To Recognize Same-Sex Marriages

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway, pictured in January 2013, said that appealing the judge's order "would be defending discrimination."
Roger Alford AP

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 12:40 pm

"Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway will not appeal a federal judge's order that the state must recognize out-of-state same-sex marriages," NPR member station WFPL reports from Louisville.

"From a constitutional perspective, Judge Heyburn got it right," Conway said in announcing his decision on Tuesday, the station adds.

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Nepal Cracks Down On Messy Everest Climbers

A Nepalese Sherpa collecting garbage, left by climbers, at an altitude of 26,250 feet during a special Everest clean-up expedition.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 12:08 pm

As Everest climbing season gets started this week, Nepal is enforcing a rule for scaling the world's tallest mountain that might sound like it came from your mother: Pick up after yourself.

While it's technically not a new rule, it has rarely if ever been enforced.

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The Two-Way
10:49 am
Tue March 4, 2014

$2 Million Settlement Closes Ohio's 'Caged Kids' Case

Down this road is the home in northern Ohio where 11 children endured abuses such as being forced to sleep in cages. They were rescued in 2005.
Jamie-Andrea Yanak AP

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 11:26 am

A notorious story that became known as the "caged kids" case after 11 young children were rescued from an Ohio home nearly a decade ago has gotten to its final chapter.

The 11 victims have reached a $2 million settlement with Ohio's Stark County where three of them had lived before being placed in the home of Michael and Sharen Gravelle, where the adoptive parents forced the children to sleep in cages.

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The Two-Way
10:28 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Divers Find 65-Foot Crack In Columbia River Dam

Divers found a 2-inch-wide crack at the bottom of the fourth spillway pier from the left in this photo of the Wanapum Dam.
Grant County Public Utility District

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 11:39 am

A large dam in Washington state has a 65-foot-long crack below its waterline, say officials who are planning repairs at the Wanapum Dam, which is owned by a county utility. Divers found the 2-inch-wide crack that runs sideways after an engineer noticed an odd curve in a conduit near the dam's roadway.

Officials have said the public is not at risk.

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The Two-Way
9:59 am
Tue March 4, 2014

For Those Itching To Etch, Great Wall Now Has A Graffiti Zone

Two of the names carved into the Great Wall, in this case near Badaling, China. Authorities hope to cut down on graffiti by giving tourists a designated spot to leave their marks.
David Guttenfelder AP

Chinese authorities are trying to contain a growing problem — graffiti written on and carved into the stones of the Great Wall of China — by giving tourists a designated section on which they can leave their marks.

China News Service reports that "Mutianyu, a famous section of the Great Wall of China, has established a specified area for graffiti to better protect the ancient heritage item, the governing authority said on Sunday."

Most of the graffiti, the news service says, is in English.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Tue March 4, 2014

At Last, No News Is Good News When It Comes To The Weather

For one day at least, an "all clear" has been issued.
National Weather Service

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 9:37 am

We wouldn't normally post a map that basically says there's nothing happening.

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The Two-Way
7:47 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Book News: 'Goodnight Moon' Author's Lullabies See The Light After 60 Years

If the latest compilation of works by Margaret Wise Brown, best known for the beloved children's book Goodnight Moon, puts you to sleep, that's a good thing.
Kathy Willens AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:29 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Putin Says Those Aren't Russian Forces In Crimea

Russian President Vladimir Putin during his news conference Tuesday.
Alexei Nikolsky AP

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 12:50 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's David Greene speaks with 'New York Times' Moscow correspondent Steven Lee Myers

(We updated this post at 11:55 a.m. ET.)

Russian soldiers have not occupied government buildings and surrounded Ukrainian military bases on the Crimean Peninsula, Russian President Vladimir Putin insisted Tuesday during a news conference near Moscow at which he gave an account of recent events that contradicts reports from the ground.

Instead, he told reporters that the heavily armed men are "local self-defense forces."

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The Two-Way
9:00 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Baseball Tests Out Its Expanded Replay System

A play involving Toronto Blue Jays' Jared Goedert was the first to be reviewed under baseball's extended replay rules.
Gene J. Puskar AP

Major League Baseball debuted its expanded replay system on Monday and all three calls challenged ended up being upheld by another umpire looking at a screen in a satellite truck.

The AP reports:

"The first test came at 3:06 p.m. EST in Fort Myers, Fla., after first base umpire Fieldin Culbreth ruled Toronto shortstop Munenori Kawasaki's throw pulled Jared Goedert off the bag in the sixth inning. ...

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The Two-Way
7:40 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Government Shutdown Cost National Parks $414 Million

The Upper Geyser Basin at sunset in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo.
Matt Volz AP

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 11:57 am

Months after the 16-day partial shutdown of the federal government, the U.S. Department of Interior has tallied the numbers and come up with a cost: National parks saw 7.88 million fewer visitors in October 2013, and that translates to a loss of $414 million.

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