Water Pollution http://wesa.fm en State Lawmakers Examine New Water Treatment Technologies http://wesa.fm/post/state-lawmakers-examine-new-water-treatment-technologies <p></p><p>There are nearly 9,100 public water systems in Pennsylvania and roughly 2,000 municipal or community water systems of all sizes. Each has unique needs when it comes to water treatment. The Joint Legislative Air and Water Pollution Control and Conservation Committee heard testimony from several people Friday in Collier Twp. about treating such water systems.</p> Fri, 01 Nov 2013 17:59:39 +0000 Deanna Garcia 19137 at http://wesa.fm State Lawmakers Examine New Water Treatment Technologies Clean Water Groups Advocate for Stronger EPA Coal Plant Regulations http://wesa.fm/post/clean-water-groups-advocate-stronger-epa-coal-plant-regulations <p>According to a <a href="http://mediad.publicbroadcasting.net/p/wesa/files/201307/ClosingTheFloodgates-Final.pdf">new report</a> from a coalition of environmental and clean water groups, including the Sierra Club and Clean Water Action, at least 20 of 28 coal fired power plants in Pennsylvania discharge toxic coal ash or wastewater. These <a href="http://content.sierraclub.org/press-releases/2013/07/new-report-shows-nearly-all-indiana-power-plants-discharge-toxic-coal-ash-or">plants have no limits</a> on the amount of toxic metals they are allowed to dump in public waters. <a href="http://pennsylvania.sierraclub.org">Kim Teplitzky of the Sierra Club</a> is one of the many concerned citizens calling for more stringent regulation by the Environmental Protection Agency under the <a href="http://www2.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-clean-water-act">Clean Water Act</a>.</p><p> Wed, 24 Jul 2013 21:45:31 +0000 Katherine Blackley 13678 at http://wesa.fm Clean Water Groups Advocate for Stronger EPA Coal Plant Regulations Should Gas Companies Be Able to Use Acid Mine Drainage for Fracking? http://wesa.fm/post/should-gas-companies-be-able-use-acid-mine-drainage-fracking <div class="field-item even"><p>Acid mine drainage is the most widespread water pollution problem in Pennsylvania. When water wells up inside abandoned coalmines, it leaches the iron compound ‘pyrite’ from the rock to form an acidic, sulfuric brine — called “yellowboy” for its color. As the pressure builds in the empty, underground mines, it often begins to seep out, the risk of a blowout increases, and, at times, the yellowboy could end up flowing into the nearest stream and killing&nbsp;wildlife.</p> Tue, 05 Mar 2013 20:16:41 +0000 Noah Brode 2044 at http://wesa.fm Should Gas Companies Be Able to Use Acid Mine Drainage for Fracking?