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Pittsburgh-based Brother’s Brother Foundation is partnering with members of the Ukrainian-American community and the U.S- Ukraine Foundation to package and send a tractor-trailer load of medical supplies for struggling hospitals on the front lines of Ukraine’s civil war.

 It’s Josh’s favorite time of year …

Happy Pittsburgh Craft Beer Week!

This week, Rachel and Josh interview Mike Pound, host of the Post-Gazette’s Beer Me blog, about several keynote events during Pittsburgh’s Beer Week (April 17 – 25).

With an abundance of established local breweries and new ones popping up every day, Pittsburgh residents can spend the next week purveying the regions’ craft beer culture, learning about home brewing, and – of course – sample great beer.

Highlighted events include:

Friday, 4/18: The Unofficial Kickoff of PCBW (With All Collaboration Beers)
Monday, 4/20: Point Brugge Strolling Happy Hour and 4/20 Beer Dinner
Wednesday, 4/22: The Imperial Breakfast @ Pipers Pub
Sunday, 4/25: East End Pedal Pale Ale Keg Ride 

Other Events:
Saturday, 4/18: Hops for HEARTH 
Sunday, 4/19: I Made It! Healthy    

via Keystone Crossroads

Jonathan Waldman’s new book — "Rust: The Longest War" — is an exploration of how corrosion eats away at the United States’ infrastructure, military equipment and monuments.

The U.S. spends $400 billion a year fighting rust. And it’s certainly something Pennsylvania’s cities—once producers of so much steel, now part of the Rust Belt — spend a lot of time dealing with.

AP Photo/Keith Srakocic

The Commonwealth Court heard arguments Wednesday about the constitutionality of a state law that has made it possible for gun rights groups, like the National Rifle Association (NRA), to sue municipalities for their local gun ordinances.

Scott Davidson / flickr

This week a video was released of an Arizona officer using his police cruiser to intentionally run down a suspect-- the latest event involving a police officer's overt use of force. It comes shortly after the shooting death of Walter Scott, as he was running away, by an officer in South Carolina. Are law enforcement officials using an increasing amount of what is sometimes deadly force? We're posing that question to Pitt Law Professor David Harris.

Harris suggests that while it's unlikely that deadly force on the part of police has actually increased, video footage of it has become more common, and increased accountability has followed:

"I don't know that we have evidence that it's worse. I do think there's a greater awareness, a much greater likelihood that we'll have video proof, and, you know, when you see it, even on only a cellphone camera, it's just different than hearing a report of it afterwards. And that's why I think that this seems to be a kind of watershed moment." -- David Harris

Also in the program, a new book co-edited by Trabian Shorters observes the everyday lives of 40 black men, paining a picture of how black men are "living, leading and succeeding" in modern America.

Allegheny County Controller Chelsa Wagner announced that her office will fully examine the property assessment appeals process. A previous audit has already looked at the actual property assessment processes.

“And now, since most of the appeals are wrapped up, we’ll be looking at the appeals process,” said Wagner. “We’ll be analyzing at lots of data, but with this, we also want the involvement of the public.”

What her office is looking for are the personal experiences of those who went through the appeals process.

Flickr user daveynin

A group of state senators is hoping toughen traffic laws around cell phone use.

Sen. Rob Teplitz (D-Dauphin) earlier this year introduced a bill to make using a cell phone while driving a secondary offense.

“There would be no violation of this law, if it were to pass, unless the person was convicted of another traffic offense,” Teplitz said.

When House Republicans presented their own proposal to cut local property taxes, the sponsoring lawmaker threw down a gauntlet along with it.

Rep. Stan Saylor (R-York) said he doubts Gov. Tom Wolf's property-tax relief plan has support within his own party.

"Nobody over there has introduced his plan," said Saylor. "If he thinks his plan's so good, I would love to see a Democrat introduce his plan. And they've had more than, what, two months to do it."

Michael Lynch / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto makes his monthly visit to the show. He talks about this week's educational summit in Pittsburgh focusing on sustainable urban development and how it will establish Pittsburgh as "the city of the future" as well as the city's new bike share program.  

Peduto says that, after a long period of managing decline, it's time to help the city grow. When looking at sustainability, however, he says we still have to proceed carefully.

"We don't want to put too much salt in the soup. We want to be able to make sure that the growth enhances what we already have... We want to be able to hit standards that exceed world standards, or at least match them, to make Pittsburgh a world leader once again on a global scale."

Also in today's show, Margaret Krauss throws back to opening day 80 years ago, when the Pittsburgh Crawfords were the best name in baseball. President of the Senator John Heinz History Center Andy Masich reveals the contents of John Brashear's time capsule, found beneath the Pittsburgh factory where he worked as a leader in developing scientific tools. 

Deanna Garcia / 90.5 WESA

To mark National Equal Pay Day, Allegheny County Controller Chelsa Wagner called on the county to ensure women are paid equally to men for the same jobs.

“Nationally we know that women are compensated 77 cents on the dollar for every dollar a man makes, and that’s for the same work” said Wagner. “In the Pittsburgh area, it’s even worse where you have women compensated 74 cents for every dollar a man makes.”

The state Senate is advancing a plan to expand law enforcement’s ability to collect people’s DNA once they’re arrested for certain crimes, but before they’re convicted.  

The measure would let police and prosecutors collect your DNA if you’re arrested for criminal homicide, sex crimes, any felonies, and certain lesser crimes like criminal trespassing and assault.

Jon Dawson / Flickr

Detroit is known as "Hockeytown USA," but could Johnstown claim the title of “Hockeyville USA?”

That depends on if it receives enough votes, according to Chad Mearns, director of marketing and communications for the Johnstown Tomahawks.

Eleven years ago, Tina Gaser moved into a home in Lawrenceville and right away noticed that when the wind blew in just the wrong direction she could smell the McConway & Torley Steel Foundry just a few blocks away.

A few years later, her husband had a stroke that doctors say could have been indirectly caused by high levels of fine particulate matter in the air. Tonight she will speak at a public hearing calling on the plant to live under tighter environmental controls.

A new report from environmental advocacy group PennFuture says that in Pennsylvania alone, $3.25 billion went to subsidize the fossil fuels industry in the 2012-2013 fiscal year. The report breaks down that that comes to $794 per taxpayer.  

Much of that subsists of tax subsidies to energy industries, such as shale gas development and legacy costs of oil, gas and coal.

Pennsylvania DAs Take Aim at Wolf's Death Penalty Moratorium

Apr 14, 2015

The Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association said Tuesday that Gov. Tom Wolf's death penalty moratorium could affect plea bargains and how judges and juries view executions, arguing it violates elements of the state constitution.

The association released a friend-of-the-court brief in a case before the state Supreme Court that challenges the governor's policy, saying he has misinterpreted the term "reprieve." The prosecutors said reprieves can only halt a criminal sentence for a defined period of time and for a reason that relates specifically to a particular convict.

State lawmakers are faced, once again, with a plan to revamp the commonwealth's organ donation procedures.

Supporters of the changes say Pennsylvania once set the national standard for organ donations, but has since fallen behind. Proposals to increase education about being a donor and streamline the organ procurement process have failed to gain approval in the past two legislative sessions. Backers of the latest proposal are hoping third time's the charm.

Essential Pittsburgh: The Local 'Fight for 15'

Apr 14, 2015
pennsylvanianow.org

On Wednesday, April 15th, low-wage workers around the country are going on strike. They’re coming together to demand the minimum wage be raised to $15 an hour. We’re previewing the rally taking place here in Pittsburgh with Rev. Richard Freeman, President of the Pennsylvania Interfaith Impact Network, and fast food worker Ashona Osborne. 

Rev. Freeman explains the rally and the involvement of PIIN by saying:

 "Central to the rally is -- rooted in our moral thought -- that everybody who works 40 hours a week should be able to sustain their families. ... I think the problem is a moral problem. Ergo, that's why the Pennsylvania Inferfaith Impact Network and our congregations are engaged." -- Rev. Richard Freeman

Asked to explain the difficulties of living on the current minimum wage, Osborne explains:

"7.25 is just chump change. I have to decide which bill is more important that week and let the other one slip until my next paycheck. ... That's either: do I pay rent off this paycheck, or do I go food shopping? Do I get my baby clothes or do I pay my light bill? And it shouldn't be like that." -- Ashona Osborne

Also in the program, Robert Morris University professor Brian O'Roark offers his assessment of how the enactment of a $15 minimum wage would impact workers, employers and the economy, and Post-Gazette reporter Len Barcousky describes how, 150 years ago today, the first presidential assassination threw the nation, and its major media outlets, for an unprecedented loop. 

The Cultural Trust announced their line-up for the EQT Children’s Theater Festival.

Pamela Komar, manager of Children’s Theater Programming at the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, said they select the participating theatrical groups critically.

“We look at the ages of children in Pittsburgh, we look at their current interests and we try to balance and bring in art forms that will be of interest to all kinds of people from all different backgrounds and all different abilities in Pittsburgh,” she said.

As the Penn Hills School District seeks an $18 million bond to cover operational costs, state Rep. Tony DeLuca (D-Allegheny) is asking state Auditor General Eugene DePasquale to get the bottom of the district’s fiscal woes.

DeLuca is calling for a full audit of the district’s budget after last week’s announcement that the district would seek court approval for the bond in order to meet debt service, payroll and retirement fund obligations.

After slogging through weeks of hearings on Gov. Tom Wolf’s 2015-16 budget proposal, the Pennsylvania Legislature returns to session Monday. Now their real work on the budget begins. 

Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne) says lawmakers need to get down to business quickly if they hope to make the June 30 deadline. Senate Republicans have scheduled only six session days this month and the same number in May. 

Topping Yudichak’s list of priorities is debating the governor’s proposed 5 percent Marcellus Shale severance tax.

Tax Calculator: How Gov. Wolf's Budget Would Affect You In Allegheny County

Apr 13, 2015
governortomwolf / flickr

Since Gov. Tom Wolf announced his ambitious budget proposal that would rework Pennsylvania’s tax structure, you may have simultaneously heard you will be better off and worse off under his proposal.

The state Department of Health says a newly-authorized system to track powerful painkillers and other drugs won't arrive on schedule.

The prescription drug monitoring program was signed into law last October to establish an online database by June of this year. But that's not going to happen, and there's no word on when the new system will be ready.

In an effort to bring down energy usage and cost, the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh (URA) is planning to upgrade the lighting at five of its parking garages: one at the Pittsburgh Technology Center and four at Southside Works.

The URA and Green Building alliance will allocate $1 million for an upgrade to LED lights. That's after an engineering study showed it would be beneficial.

The Department of Environmental Protection is moving forward with a plan to clean up the Kuhn’s landfill in Darlington Township, Beaver County.

The landfill was used to dump municipal and industrial waste from 1964 until 1980 when the DEP shut it down on legal grounds. After that the DEP placed a ground cap over the site to keep various hazardous material contained. Since then other more potentially dangerous threats have kept the attention and funding of the DEP — until now.

flickr

April 14th marks how far into the year a woman must work in order to earn the same amount of money as a man in the previous year. The Bayer Center for Nonprofit Management will host a “Great Debate,” in which opinion leaders will argue their stances on the event’s theme: how nonprofits are addressing the gender pay gap, and whether or not it should be their priority. Robert Morris Associate Professor Daria C. Crawley and Bayer Center executive director and founder Peggy Morrison Outon join us to discuss how nonprofits take responsibility for wage inequities.

Peggy Morrison explains why there is a pattern of lower salaries among female workers in non-profits:

"One thing in the 70 interviews that I did in our research shows that women will negotiate for salary before they join a non-profit, but once they join the non-profit it becomes their family and they are very reluctant to advocate for themselves. "

Also in today's show, Bob Dvorchak joins us to debrief the recent announcement of Troy Polamalu's retirement, the Pirate's home opener, and a prediction for Penguin's playoff games.

State Gives Boost to Local Museums

Apr 13, 2015
Courtesy Photo/ The Pennsylvania Trolley Museum

Three southwestern Pennsylvania museums received a total of $17,800 in grants from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission March 19 to support operating costs.

Grants for the Washington County Historical Society, the Pennsylvania Trolley Museum in Chartiers Township, and the Greene County Historical Society in Waynesburg came from the museum commission’s Cultural and Historical Support Grant Program, which currently serves 121 facilities across the state.

Courtesy The Mr. Roboto Project

The Mr. Roboto Project, a cooperatively run, alcohol-free all ages music and arts venue in Garfield, prides itself on being a “safer space.”

According to the Roboto website, “racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, or any other types of oppressive language are considered inappropriate and are not tolerated. Roboto is meant to be a safe, respectful, welcoming space for everyone.”

Andrew-M-Whitman / Flickr

The National Guard can say goodbye to its Apache attack helicopters.

By this fall, the Army will take control of all National Guard Apache aircrafts as part of its Aviation Restructuring Initiative, starting with 24 from the Johnstown Military Aviation Complex and another 24 from the Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri.

Somerset County is trying to find a way to connect the Flight 93 National Memorial with the Great Allegheny Passage as part of a 1,100-mile September 11 National Memorial Trail, which would link the World Trade Center and Pentagon with the Flight 93 crash site.

In Coal Country, What's Next for Miners?

Apr 10, 2015
Catherine Moore / For the Allegheny Front

At a fire hall in Logan County, West Virginia, dozens of coal miners and their families are mulling around a room. State officials called this meeting to help them figure out what to do next after the coal mine they worked in closed. Dell Maynard is one of these miners. His primary emotion right now is shock.

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