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5:01 am
Fri May 23, 2014

Summer Travel Season Expected To Heat Up

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 1:46 pm

AAA predicts that more Americans will travel this Memorial Day weekend than any other since the start of the Great Recession. Those who do may find higher air fares but gas prices have leveled off.

Parallels
3:06 am
Fri May 23, 2014

Palestinians Appeal To Pope For Help In Land Disputes With Israel

Father Ibrahim Shomali, a Palestinian priest, holds prayer vigils every Friday in the Cremisan Valley near Bethlehem. Israel is planning to build a wall, citing security needs, on agricultural land here owned by a local monastery. Shomali has asked Pope Francis to intervene.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 10:25 am

When Pope Francis visits Jerusalem on Monday, he will celebrate Mass in one of the holiest Christian sites in the world.

The Cenacle, or the Upper Room, is traditionally considered the place where Christ shared his Last Supper with disciples before he was crucified.

But the spot is holy not only to Christians. Below, some Jews believe, is the tomb of King David. A mosque has also stood on this site.

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All Tech Considered
2:58 am
Fri May 23, 2014

What Those Baby Photos On Social Media Can Teach Us About Moms

"People are grappling with identity when they become parents, and they're also grappling with identity in terms of who we are online," says psychologist Daphne de Marneffe (not pictured).
Jonathan Ross iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 7:52 am

You can't miss 'em. Baby pictures have flooded so many Instagram and Facebook feeds that an app is now available to block them, if you want. But as the newness of social media collides with an experience as old as time — motherhood — researchers are beginning to study its sociological and psychological impacts.

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The Two-Way
10:49 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Obama To Nominate San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro For Housing Secretary

San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro delivers the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., in 2012. President Obama is expected to announce Castro's nomination to become housing secretary on Friday.
Jason Reed Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 9:01 am

A White House official said Thursday that President Obama will tap San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro to become housing secretary and Shaun Donovan, his current housing chief, to run the budget office.

A formal announcement is scheduled to be made on Friday afternoon.

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The Two-Way
8:52 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Tennessee Gov. OKs Allowing Electric Chair For Executions

A warden at Riverbend Maximum Security Institution in Nashville, Tenn., is shown in the prison's execution chamber in 1999. The electric chair is shown next to a lethal injection gurney.
Mark Humphrey AP

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 12:54 pm

Tennessee's governor has signed a bill that would allow the state to use the electric chair if lethal injection drugs are unavailable.

A spokesman for Republican Gov. Bill Haslam confirmed to The Associated Press that the legislation had been signed after passing the state Senate by a 23-3 vote and the House by a 68-13 margin.

The AP reports:

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It's All Politics
7:10 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Sen. Isakson: Boggs Fight Won't Break White House Deal

Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., speaks during a May 2013 Senate Finance Committee hearing.
Charles Dharapak AP

If the judicial nomination of Michael Boggs gets derailed, at least one of Georgia's senators says it won't unravel a deal the two senators entered with the White House to select seven nominees for the federal bench in Georgia.

"The deal was we agreed on seven nominees for seven judicial appointments and asked for all of them to get a hearing at the same time, and that was the deal," said Republican Sen. Johnny Isakson of Georgia. "Everybody lived up to what they said."

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Health
6:47 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Think Work Is Stressful? For Many, It's More Relaxing Than Home

Work can be rough, but a researcher has found that for many people, being at home is more stressful than being at the office.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 7:10 pm

Many Americans say their jobs are stressful — we complain of too much to do in too little time, demanding bosses or difficult colleagues. But researcher Sarah Damaske wanted to know, objectively, is being at work any harder than being at home?

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The Two-Way
6:45 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

McDonald's CEO Says Fast-Food Jobs Can Lead To 'Real Careers'

Hundreds of workers, organizers and supporters gather outside McDonald's Corp. on Thursday, in Oak Brook, Ill., calling for $15 an hour and the right to unionize.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 7:16 pm

As hundreds of protesters loudly demanded higher wages outside McDonald's headquarters in suburban Chicago, the company's CEO told an audience inside that the fast-food giant has a heritage of providing opportunities that lead to "real careers."

"We believe we pay fair and competitive wages," Donald Thompson said at the company's annual meeting on Thursday.

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The Two-Way
6:44 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

U.S. Soccer Star Landon Donovan Fails To Make World Cup Cut

Landon Donovan practices with the U.S. Men's National Team in Stanford, Calif., last week. U.S. Soccer announced Thursday he had not made the roster for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.
Josh Edelson AFP/Getty Images

Landon Donovan, the all-time leader in scoring and assists for the U.S. Men's National Soccer Team, will not be part of the 2014 FIFA World Cup roster in Brazil, U.S. Soccer says.

ESPN writes: "Donovan, 32, has played for the U.S. in the past three World Cups dating back to 2002. He has been the face of the national team for most of the past decade, but spoke in recent months about how his body is no longer what it had once been."

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It's All Politics
6:30 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Senate To NFL: Change The Redskins' Name

Both senators in Maryland — where the Washington Redskins play — signed on to a letter urging NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to get the team to change its name.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 7:01 pm

The United States Senate ratcheted up the pressure on owner Daniel Snyder on Thursday after a letter — signed by half the Senate — was sent to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, asking him to use his authority to get the Washington Redskins to change a team name that many consider racist.

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Shots - Health News
6:08 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Diabetes Raises Women's Risk Of Heart Disease More Than For Men

About 8 percent of Americans have diabetes.
iStockphoto

Diabetes increases a woman's risk of dying from a heart attack or a stroke much more than it does for men, and scientists are trying to figure out why.

Women with diabetes were almost three times more likely to develop heart disease than women without the disease, a relative risk that's 44 percent higher than it is for men. That's despite the fact that men are more likely to have heart disease than women overall.

Since heart disease already is the number one killer of women, and the number of people with diabetes has been rising rapidly, this is not good news.

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The Salt
5:58 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

How Yelp Can Help Disease Detectives Track Food Poisoning

The Yelp app maps out restaurant locations in Manhattan.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 6:01 pm

Almost 50 million Americans get food poisoning every year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates. But only a tiny fraction of those cases get reported, making it tough to figure out where they came from.

But health officials recently discovered a trove of data that may help them discover outbreaks of foodborne illness and as well as the restaurants responsible for them, they write in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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The Two-Way
5:55 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Senate Confirms Author Of Drone Memo To Federal Bench

This May 20, 2013, file photo shows Harvard Law Professor David Barron during a forum at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston.
Michael Dwyer AP

The Senate voted Thursday to confirm David Barron, whose judicial nomination had been threatened by his work shaping the Obama administration's drone policy.

The vote to seat Barron on the 1st Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston was 53 to 45. Democrats Mary Landrieu of Louisiana and Joe Manchin of West Virginia joined a unified Republican caucus in opposing the nomination.

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All Tech Considered
5:50 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Can Cop-Worn Cameras Restore Faith In New Orleans Police?

Lt. Travis St. Pierre, of the New Orleans Police Department, shows off a body-worn camera during a press conference in January.
Brett Duke The Times-Picayune/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 2:23 pm

Body-worn video cameras are quickly becoming standard-issue for American police, especially at departments in the process of reform. And in New Orleans, the troubled police department is now requiring almost all officers to wear the cameras.

The city's police department has a dark history of corruption, racism and brutality. The low point may have been the Danziger Bridge episode, after Hurricane Katrina, when police shot unarmed people, then covered up the crime.

These days, the department is trying to rebuild the public's trust — which is where the body cameras come in.

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It's All Politics
5:23 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Billionaire Environmentalist Targets 7 Statewide Races

Businessman Tom Steyer listens during a meeting to announce the launch of a group called Virginians for Clean Government in September 2013.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 7:59 pm

San Francisco billionaire Tom Steyer has already pledged at least $50 million to his superPAC, NextGen Climate, and now the superPAC's leaders are laying out a hardball strategy for the fall campaign.

The goal: tag seven Republican candidates as "science deniers" who are on the wrong side of the increasingly urgent climate change issue.

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Photography And Memory
5:10 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories

Rebecca Woolf takes a lot of photos of her children for her blog, Girl's Gone Child, but says she tries to not let the camera get in the middle of a moment.
Courtesy of Rebecca Woolf

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 12:58 pm

Los Angeles blogger Rebecca Woolf uses her blog, Girl's Gone Child, as a window into her family's life. Naturally, it includes oodles of pictures of her four children.

She says she's probably taken tens of thousands of photos since her oldest child was born. And she remembers the moment when it suddenly clicked — if you will — that she was too absorbed in digital documentation.

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Asia
5:10 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Violence Rises In Western Chinese Province

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 6:46 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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From Our Listeners
5:10 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Letters: NPR's special series

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 6:46 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Time now for your letters and this correction. This week, the Supreme Court ruled on a case involving the 1980 boxing film, "Raging Bull." It stars Robert De Niro as champion boxer Jake LaMotta.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "RAGING BULL")

ROBERT DE NIRO: (as Jake LaMotta) Harder. Harder.

JOE PESCI: (as Joey) Aww, come on. You want to stop now? That's enough of that.

NIRO: (as Jake LaMotta) Harder.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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The Two-Way
5:03 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

3 More Men Charged In Conspiracy Case Roiling Miss. Senate Race

Clayton Kelly, the blogger at the center of the Mississippi conspiracy case, is shown here in a booking photograph taken on Saturday.
Madison County Detention Center AP

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 6:23 pm

Mississippi is home to what may be the most contentious primary election in the country. It's also the scene of one of the oddest political stories of the year.

Three men were charged with conspiracy Thursday in an incident that has come to dominate political discussion in the state.

Supporters of state Sen. Chris McDaniel, who is challenging Mississippi Republican Sen. Thad Cochran, allegedly conspired to take and publish photographs of Cochran's wife, Rose, at her nursing home.

Rose Cochran suffers from progressive dementia and has been bedridden for years.

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The Two-Way
5:02 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Mars Weathercam Spots Big New Crater

A photograph of the new crater (large, center). Take by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

Before and after shots taken by a Mars-orbiting satellite have detected a newly created impact crater half the size of a football field near the planet's equator.

NPR's Joe Palca says that while objects are striking Mars all the time (with big chunks surviving until impact, thanks to the Red Planet's thin atmosphere), this is the first time scientists have been able to determine the exact day a meteor struck – in this case, sometime on March 28, 2012.

But it wasn't noticed until two months ago.

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Shots - Health News
4:34 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Insurance Fee For Big Businesses Helps Fund Obamacare

Employees lift weights near the end of a workout class at the Sherwin-Williams corporate health and wellness center in downtown Cleveland.
Sarah Jane Tribble / WCPN

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 6:46 pm

The world of health care, like any, is full of haves and have-nots.

It's not hard to the haves at Sherwin-Williams' corporate headquarters in downtown Cleveland where some 2,500 employees have access to an in-house health and wellness center.

The huge paint company offers comprehensive health coverage to its employees and encourages them to take a break from work for an exercise class, a workout on the elliptical trainer or a run on the treadmill.

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NPR Story
4:34 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Upcoming Elections In Colombia Get Sidetracked

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 6:46 pm

Colombians vote for president on Sunday, deciding whether to send the incumbent back to office so he can continue peace talks with leftist rebels. John Otis reports that the campaign has gotten dirty.

Movie Interviews
4:34 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

For Actor Michael C. Hall, 'Cold In July' Is A Departure (Of Sorts)

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 1:48 pm

Michael C. Hall is most famous for playing a serial killer on the television show Dexter. In his new movie, Cold in July, he plays an ordinary guy whose life changes after one accidental act of violence. Audie Cornish talks to actor Hall about the making of a violent man.

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Book Reviews
4:26 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

In Cunningham's Latest, Powerful Language Makes Up For Weak Plot

Author Michael Cunningham

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 6:46 pm

Michael Cunningham is known for his lyric and evocative language, and his sixth novel, The Snow Queen, is no exception, though the novel's plot leaves something to be desired. The setting is Bushwick, Brooklyn. It's November, 2004, and the neighborhood, though lightly gentrifying, is still a no-man's-land of desolate streets, industrial warehouses, and lopsided apartments. Two brothers, Barrett and Tyler Meeks, along with Tyler's fiancee, Beth, are living their lives the best they can in a two-bedroom on Knickerbocker Avenue.

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Science
3:59 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Big Flightless Birds Come From High-Flying Ancestors

The egg definitely came before the chicken in this case — the skeleton is from a modern adult kiwi, the egg from its much bigger, long-extinct cousin, Aepyornis maximus.
Kyle Davis and Paul Scofield Canterbury Museum

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 8:06 pm

Big, flightless birds like the ostrich, the emu and the rhea are scattered around the Southern Hemisphere because their ancestors once flew around the world, a new study suggests.

That's a surprise, because it means birds in Australia, Africa and South America independently evolved in ways that made them all lose the ability to fly.

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