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The Two-Way
6:43 am
Mon October 21, 2013

UPDATE: N.J. Gov. Christie Won't Fight Gay-Marriage Ruling

The hands of Beth Asaro, left, and Joanne Schailey after they exchanged vows to become the first same-sex couple married in Lambertville, N.J., early Monday.
Rich Schultz AP

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 2:09 pm

"Gov. Chris Christie announced today that he was dropping the fight against same-sex marriage in New Jersey by withdrawing his appeal of a major case that was being heard by the state Supreme Court," The Star-Ledger writes.

Christie's office has released a copy if its court filing, in which it officially withdraws its appeal.

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Strange News
5:44 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Scary Halloween Display Prompts Police To Get Involved

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. We are well into Halloween decorating season and police say a British man took it too far. He decorates his front yard each Halloween, raises money for cancer research. Admirable. But police became involved because his display terrified neighborhood children. He was inspired by the movie "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre."

Animals
5:35 am
Mon October 21, 2013

How Did The Chicken Cross The Road? In Style

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:37 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

We all know why the chicken crossed the road. A new product wants to make sure they get to the other side safely. As chickens become more popular as pets, British company Omlet is selling high-visibility chicken jackets; tiny fluorescent safety vets when they're out on the street. The jackets also protect the birds against rain and cold. But the website warns that owner should be sure to remove them before bedtime. They are not suitable as pajamas.

Business
5:03 am
Mon October 21, 2013

What To Know About The Tentative JPMorgan Deal

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:37 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. The Justice Department is on the verge of a $13 billion settlement with JPMorgan Chase. That would make it the biggest government fine involving a single company. It involves the allegedly improper sale of mortgage securities that led to the financial crisis of 2008. NPR's Chris Arnold has been following this and he joins us now. Good morning.

CHRIS ARNOLD, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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Around the Nation
5:03 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Ranchers Wonder If U.S. Sheep Industry Has Bottomed Out

The changing landscape of of agriculture is leaving many sheep farms in the dust. Farms are larger and technology makes crops more economically attractive and sheep herds less.
Luke Runyon Harvest Public Meida/KUNC

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:37 pm

Over the last 20 years, the number of sheep in the U.S. has plummeted by half. The sheep industry has actually been declining since the late 1940s, when it hit its peak.

The sharp drop in production has left ranchers to wonder, "When are we going to hit the bottom?"

Some sheep are raised for their wool, others primarily for food. Consumption of both products — lamb meat and wool — have been declining in the U.S.

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Author Interviews
3:07 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Scott Adams Explains 'How To Fail At Almost Everything' (Except Dilbert)

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:37 pm

Scott Adams has failed at a lot of things, from investments to inventions to computer programming. But he managed to turn his failure at office work into a giant success: a comic strip which follows a hapless, cubicle-bound engineer working for an unreasonable boss at a nameless company. Dilbert, which is based on Adams' own experience working in corporate America, appears online and in 2,000 newspapers.

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Keys To The Whole World: American Public Libraries
3:06 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Turning A Page Inside A Rural One-Room Library

Luster checks out books for frequent library visitor Phyllis Smith. Luster says she thinks of herself as a book curator.
Jennifer Davidson KSMU

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:37 pm

There's one state highway running through Myrtle, Mo. It's a sleepy town in the Ozarks, population about 300. There's no bank or restaurant here, but enormous oak and persimmon trees loom over a small stone building right next to the road. Half of it is a post office; the other half, a one-room public library.

Rachel Reynolds Luster took over this branch four months ago with the goal of creating a learning hub. She calls herself a curator, not just a librarian.

Her first task? Filtering out some of the favorites of the previous librarian.

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Shots - Health News
3:05 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Should Severe Premenstrual Symptoms Be A Mental Disorder?

Women's moods can change based on the phases of their menstrual cycle. But does that mean they have a psychiatric disorder?
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:37 pm

The way Ronna Simmons of Philadelphia describes it, every two weeks a timer goes off.

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StoryCorps
3:04 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Air The StoryCorps Theme, Cue The Tears

Radio documentarian Dave Isay stands next to one of two StoryCorps Airstream trailers outfitted with recording studios a few years after the project was launched. StoryCorps is celebrating its 10th anniversary.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:37 pm

NPR's Steve Inskeep has a confession to make. In order to remain composed as the host of Morning Edition, he sometimes has to turn the volume down in the studio when the StoryCorps segment airs on Fridays.

"I just wait for the clock to run down so I know when to talk at the end because otherwise I know I'm going to lose it if I listen to that story," Inskeep tells StoryCorps founder Dave Isay. "It's deeply moving."

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Shots - Health News
3:03 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Enrollments For Health Care Exchanges Trickle In, Slowly

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:37 pm

The Obama administration's hopes ran high that millions would flock to enroll for health insurance on state and federal exchanges established under the Affordable Care Act.

Those exchanges went online Oct. 1. The administration projected that half a million individuals or families would enroll within 30 days, according to The Associated Press.

But three weeks in, the data suggest the actual number of enrollments is lagging far behind that number.

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Books
5:39 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

For The Ultimate Getaway, Why Not South Sudan?

Most people associate the Nile with Egypt, but the river also flows through South Sudan, where much of it is bordered by jungle. That makes it a excellent destination for rafting and wildlife enthusiasts, says travel guide author Max Lovell-Hoare.
Courtesy of Levison Wood/Secret Compass

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:02 pm

With cooler temperatures approaching, you might be in the market for a perfect wintertime vacation. Maybe someplace sunny and warm, unspoiled by tourists, with beautiful views and rich culture.

To find all that, you might consider South Sudan. That's the suggestion from Sophie and Max Lovell-Hoare, authors of the Bradt Travel Guide to the young country.

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All Tech Considered
5:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

What's Creepy, Crawly And A Champion Of Neuroscience?

The RoboRoach device allows users to influence the movements of cockroaches with a smartphone.
Backyard Brains

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:02 pm

Soon you'll be able to direct the path of a cockroach with a smartphone and the swipe of your finger.

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Science
5:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

Climate Watcher Says He's Done With Flying

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:02 pm

Meteorologist Eric Holthaus has made his career monitoring the Earth's climate, and he's alarmed at what he sees. After reading a new, bleak international report on climate change, Holthaus has decided one important way to reduce his carbon footprint is to give up airplane travel for good.

Around the Nation
5:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

World's Eyes On Washington's New Recreational Pot Rules

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:02 pm

Washington State has finalized rules for recreational marijuana sales, joining Colorado in beginning to create a legal framework for the pot industry. Randy Simmons, deputy director of the Washington Liquor Control Board, says other states and even other countries are watching Washington's developing system very closely.

Science
5:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

To Fix Climate Change, Scientists Turn To Hacking The Earth

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 2:52 pm

In the summer of 2012, a small group of the Haida people, a native community in Canada, had a problem. The salmon they rely on were disappearing. So the Haida took matters into their own hands.

They partnered with an American businessman, drew up plans and then took a boat full of iron dust into the waters off their home island and put the dust in the ocean.

When they spread the iron dust, it created a big algae bloom. They hoped the algae would soak up carbon dioxide and bring back the fish.

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Music Interviews
5:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

Anoushka Shankar And Norah Jones: Half-Sisters Collaborate At Last

Anoushka Shankar's new album, Traces of You, comes out Tuesday.
Harper Smith Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:02 pm

Anoushka Shankar began playing sitar with her famous father, the late Ravi Shankar, when she was 4. But until recently, she'd never entered a studio with her other famous relative, half-sister Norah Jones.

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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

SEE: Banksy's Month (So Far) In New York City

A man takes a photograph while another poses in front of Banksy's latest work depicting a pre-Sep. 11 New York City skyline.
Daniel Pierce Wright Getty Images

The reclusive British street artist Banksy has unleashed an interesting experiment on New York City.

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

As Strike Continues, Two Bay Area Transit Workers Killed By Train

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) trains sit idle at a BART maintenance facility on the first day of the BART strike on October 18, in Richmond, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Two Bay-Area transit workers performing a track inspection were killed by an out-of-service train on Saturday, the Bay Area Rapid Transit agency said.

The accident comes amid a strike that has paralyzed the system. The New York Times reports:

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The Two-Way
12:12 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

Obama Administration Addresses Health Care Website Fumbles

A woman looks at the HealthCare.gov insurance exchange internet site.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 12:17 pm

The Obama administration has started to confront the many technological problems that have hampered the roll out of the new health care law.

"I think that there's no one more frustrated than the president at the difficulty in the website," Treasury Secretary Jack Lew said on Meet the Press this morning.

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Wildfires In Australia Destroy 200 Homes, May Get Worse

The charred headland at Catherine Hill Bay near Wyong on the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia.
Dean Lewins EPA /LANDOV

Authorities in Australia say major wildfires that have already scorched about 200 homes and 269,000 acres, could get worse.

CNN reports:

"'These conditions that we are looking at are a whole new ballgame and in a league of their own,' said the commissioner of rural fire services, Shane Fitzsimmons. 'The predictive charts indicate that there will be a significant impact on populated areas should all these forecasts materialize.'

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The Two-Way
8:49 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Sox Vs. Cards: 5 Things To Know About The World Series

Jonny Gomes of the Boston Red Sox celebrates after defeating the Detroit Tigers in Game Six of the American League Championship Series at Fenway Park on Sunday.
Jared Wickerham Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 2:45 pm

The Boston Red Sox clinched the American League pennant last night during a 5-2 win over the Detroit Tigers in Game 6 of the American League Championship Series.

That means the World Series matchup is set: It'll be the Red Sox vs. the St. Louis Cardinals beginning Wednesday in Boston.

With that, here are five things you should know about the upcoming championship series:

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Sunday Puzzle
8:03 am
Sun October 20, 2013

No Time To Be Bashful

NPR

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 12:16 pm

This week we have a celebrity edition of the Puzzle. Comedian Paula Poundstone is taking on our challenge. Poundstone is also a regular panelist on NPR's Wait Wait Don't Tell Me.

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The Two-Way
7:53 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Syrian Peace Talks To Start In November

Arab League Secretary General Nabill el-Araby says negotiations to broker a political solution to Syria's bloody civil war will begin in November.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 1:50 pm

Negotiations to try to broker a political solution to Syria's bloody civil war will begin in Geneva on Nov. 23.

That's according to Arab League chief Nabil el-Araby, who spoke to reporters after meeting with Lakhdar Brahimi, the joint U.N.-Arab League envoy to Syria.

These meetings have been a long time coming, but until now have not materialized because at different points, the Syrian regime and the Syrian rebels have refused to come to the table.

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Health
7:47 am
Sun October 20, 2013

With Addiction, Breaking A Habit Means Resisting A Reflex

Addiction can come in a lot of forms, but the characteristics are the same.
aurumarcus Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 11:27 am

The pull of addiction can come from many directions: from food to alcohol to the Internet. So what connects those dependencies?

"Addiction is a memory, it's a reflex. It's training your brain in something which is harmful to yourself," says Dr. Charles P. O'Brien, co-founder of the Center for Studies of Addiction at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Code Switch
6:14 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Asian-American Band Fights To Trademark Name 'The Slants'

The Slants' band members are all of Asian descent.
Courtesy of The Slants

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 10:08 am

The Slants, a six-member band from Portland, Ore., calls their sound "Chinatown Dance Rock" — a little bit New Order, a little bit Depeche Mode. They describe themselves as one of the first Asian-American rock bands. Their music caters to an Asian-American crowd, they've spoken at various Asian-American events, and they're proud of all of it.

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