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The Two-Way
10:04 am
Mon December 30, 2013

NFL Firings Begin: Browns, Redskins, Others Ax Coaches

He's out: Washington Redskins head coach Mike Shanahan on Sunday during the team's loss to the New York Giants. He was fired on Monday.
Jeff Zelevansky Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 12:20 pm

Coaches' heads are beginning to roll in the National Football League, now that the 2013 regular season is over.

NFL.com reports that:

-- Cleveland Browns coach Rod Chudzinski has lost his job after just one season with the club. The Browns finished with a 4-12 record.

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The Two-Way
8:56 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Third Icebreaker Fails To Reach Stranded Ship In Antarctic

Nowhere to go: A view from the MV Akademik Shokalskiy, which is trapped in thick Antarctic ice 1,500 nautical miles south of Hobart, Australia.
Andrew Peacock/Australasian Antarctic Expedition/Footloose Fotography AP

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 2:17 pm

"Bad news: Aurora couldn't get through. Tried twice. Low visibility & heavy ice. Returning to open water. Try again tomorrow?"

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The Two-Way
7:56 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Doctors Unsure Whether Michael Schumacher Will Survive

Race car driver Michael Schumacher in November 2012.
Mark Thompson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 8:42 am

One of the world's most famous and highest-paid athletes, Formula One racer Michael Schumacher, is in a medically induced coma at a hospital in Grenoble, France. Doctors there are treating him for a critical head injury suffered over the weekend when the German driver fell and hit his head while skiing.

His prognosis?

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It's All Politics
7:42 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Assessing Bloomberg's Legacy Is A Complex Task

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks at the opening of the New York Genome Center on Sept. 19 in New York City.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 11:16 am

At the end of this month, Michael Bloomberg ends his three terms as mayor of New York City. Assessing Bloomberg's legacy, a man who went from Republican to Independent, is not a simple thing to do. His 12 years in office were groundbreaking, locally and even globally.

But at the same time, many New Yorkers found him arrogant and insensitive to the poor. It's a vein that was tapped successfully by Democratic Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio, who described New York as a city of haves and have nots. But the changes implemented by Bloomberg will impact generations of New Yorkers to come.

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The Two-Way
6:58 am
Mon December 30, 2013

'Blood On The Snow' After Second Suicide Blast In Russia

A woman wiped away tears Monday in Volgograd, Russia, after the second suicide bombing in that city in the past two days.
Denis Tyrin AP

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 3:42 pm

  • From the NPR Newscast: Second attack in Volgograd
  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Corey Flintoff reports about the bombings in Volgograd

There's shock in the southern Russian city of Volgograd after what appears to have been the second suicide bombing in two days.

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Around the Nation
6:07 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Crushed Strawberry Won't Ruin Harrisburg's New Year

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 7:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Nothing says New Year like the giant sparkling ball lowered in Times Square. Still, other cities have other traditions. In Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, they drop a giant strawberry. And this year, that tradition went splat. In a test drop last Friday, a malfunction sent the big fiberglass strawberry plunging three stories, shattering on the sidewalk. They're now rushing to get a new strawberry ready for the New Year. That's tomorrow. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:20 am
Mon December 30, 2013

How Do You Get A Cow Out Of Your Swimming Pool?

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 7:42 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I David Greene.

How do you get a cow out of a swimming pool? Wait, hear me out, this is not the setup for a bad joke. It's real conundrum faced by an Oregon man last week. The solution, it turns out, involves draining the entire pool, also a series of straps and ropes, a ramp, a bucket of oats, and 10 firefighters to haul the cow out. The homeowner says he's not sure how the cow got into the pool; that's just the setup for a whole other joke.

It's MOO-NING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Salt
4:52 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best

Studies suggest cinnamon can help control blood sugar, but if you want to incorporate more of this spice in your diet, consider using the Ceylon variety.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 12:47 pm

If I say cinnamon, you say ... sugar? It's a popular combination, of course.

But if you're interested in the health-promoting effects of cinnamon, you may want to think anew about the spice.

For instance, says John Critchley, executive chef at Bourbon Steak Restaurant in Washington, D.C., why not add it to savory dishes? He uses cinnamon to create a spice and herb rub for lamb loin. He also whips up a great spinach salad with raisins, pine nuts and cinnamon.

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NPR Story
4:52 am
Mon December 30, 2013

TV Prank Reveals News Media Shortcoming

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 7:42 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK, let's look back just a single year now with NPR's TV critic Eric Deggans. He's been giving us his most memorable television moments from 2013. And this morning, Eric has something of a twofer because he says the best TV prank of the year became one of the worst moments for television journalists.

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NPR Story
4:52 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Egyptian Authorities Detain Foreign Journalists

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 7:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The crackdown against the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt is netting foreign journalists. A team from Al Jazeera English was detained by police yesterday. Egypt's military-led government has accused them of spreading false news and also of talking to members of the banned Muslim Brotherhood. Just a reminder, the Brotherhood is the movement led by Mohamed Morsi, who was deposed as president last summer. For more, we reached Shadi Hamid, an analyst with the Brookings Institution center in Doha. Welcome back to the show.

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All Tech Considered
3:23 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Hot On YouTube: Videos About Video Games, And Science, Too

A screengrab of a YouTube video of the game Walking Dead from the Swedish gamer known as PewDiePie. Videos of people offering commentary while playing video games are wildly popular on YouTube.
YouTube/PewDiePie

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 10:34 am

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All Tech Considered
3:22 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Can Robots Manage Your Money Better Than You? Startups Say Yes

Several Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are developing services that manage consumers' investment portfolios with algorithms rather than people.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 11:14 am

Millions of people are turning their thoughts to self-improvement and New Year's resolutions this week. And one of the most common resolutions, after promises to lose weight or get in better shape, is to be better about money.

A handful of entrepreneurs in the Bay Area have taken note — and they believe the time has come for you to try a different way of managing your money.

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Shots - Health News
3:22 am
Mon December 30, 2013

$1,000 Pill For Hepatitis C Spurs Debate Over Drug Prices

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 3:43 pm

Federal regulators this month opened a new era in the treatment of a deadly liver virus that infects three to five times more people than HIV. Now the question is: Who will get access to the new drug for hepatitis C, and when?

The drug Sovaldi will cost $1,000 per pill. A typical course of treatment will last 12 weeks and run $84,000, plus the cost of necessary companion drugs. Some patients may need treatment for twice as long.

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Code Switch
3:21 am
Mon December 30, 2013

Films With Black Actors, Directors Go To 11 In 2013

Monica Calhoun (left), Melissa De Sousa and Nia Long star in The Best Man Holiday, one of this year's eleven top-grossing films starring black actors and by black directors.
Michael Gibson Universal Pictures

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 11:33 am

As we near the end of 2013, NPR is taking a look at the numbers that tell the story of this year — numbers that, if you really understand them, give insight into the world we're living in, right now. You'll hear the stories behind numbers ranging from zero to 1 trillion.

When it comes to race and film, the number of the year is 11.

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Remembrances
5:42 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

Remembering Eydie Gorme, A Vegas Singer Without The Drama

Steve Lawrence (left), Edyie Gorme (center) and Jerry Lewis sing during the MDA Telethon at the Sahara Hotel in 1993.
AP

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 12:52 pm

Before turning the page on 2013, All Things Considered wanted to tell you stories you haven't heard — unknown stories about people you've heard of, and unknown people who have affected your lives in ways you can't imagine.

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Remembrances
5:42 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

The FBI Investigator Who Coined The Term 'Serial Killer'

FBI investigator Robert Ressler pioneered the practice of criminal profiling and is credited with coining the term "serial killer." He died on May 5.
Paul Harris Getty Images

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 6:41 pm

Before turning the page on 2013, All Things Considered wanted to tell you stories you haven't heard — unknown stories about people you've heard of, and unknown people who have affected your lives in ways you can't imagine.

If you've heard the phrase "serial killer," then you're familiar with the work of Robert Ressler.

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Remembrances
5:42 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

'League Of Their Own' Inspiration Didn't Mind A Dirty Skirt

Lavonne "Pepper" Paire Davis (front row, second from the right) played for the Fort Wayne Daisies in 1945.
Courtesy of Kelly Candaele

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 7:50 am

Before turning the page on 2013, All Things Considered wanted to tell you stories you haven't heard — unknown stories about people you've heard of, and unknown people who have affected your lives in ways you can't imagine.

The passing of one sports legend went largely unnoticed this year. She's a figure you might know from the movie A League of Their Own, starring Geena Davis and Tom Hanks.

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Remembrances
5:42 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

Lost In 2013: Three Nobel Scientists Who Saw Something In Us

Pallbearers carry the flag-draped coffin of Francois Jacob, Nobel Prize-winner and World War II veteran, in Paris on April 24.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 6:41 pm

Before turning the page on 2013, All Things Considered wanted to tell you stories you haven't heard — unknown stories about people you've heard of, and unknown people who have affected your lives in ways you can't imagine.

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Author Interviews
5:42 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

Booking A Flight For The 'Golden Age Of Hijacking'

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 6:43 pm

Imagine air travel in the 1960s when flying the skies meant luxury. You could light up a cigarette on board and enjoy a five-star meal.

Going to the airport wasn't a hassle. There were no security screenings, and boarding a plane was just as easy as getting on a bus.

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NPR Story
5:42 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

Fracking Pioneer Helped Boost U.S. Energy Independence

George Mitchell, the "father of hydraulic fracturing," passed away earlier this year. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Wall Street Journal reporter Russell Gold about Mitchell's invention and his somewhat progressive environmental views.

The Two-Way
4:50 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

Air Evacuation Is Being Considered For Antarctic Passengers

Russian ship MV Akademik Shokalskiy is trapped in thick Antarctic ice, 1,500 nautical miles south of Hobart, Australia.
Andrew Peacock AP

The crew and expedition leaders aboard the MV Akademik Shokalskiy are considering an air evacuation of the passengers on board the ship, which is stuck in Antarctic ice.

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The Two-Way
3:28 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

French High Court OKs 75 Percent Tax For Top Earners

French President François Hollande.
Lionel Bonaventure AFP/Getty Images

Employers paying French citizens more than 1 million euros a year ($1.37 million) will have to pay a 75 percent tax for the next two years, France's top constitutional court ruled on Sunday.

As Bloomberg reports, the millionaire tax was a campaign promise from French President François Hollande. Bloomberg adds:

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The Two-Way
2:35 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

Lebanese Ambassador To U.S. Remembered As A Voice For Moderation

A Lebanese woman chants slogans against Hezbollah leader Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, during the funeral of Mohamad Chatah, a senior aide to former Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, who was assassinated on Friday by a car bomb.
Bilal Hussein AP

After the former Lebanese ambassador to the United States was killed on Friday, analysts wondered if it was a sign that the war in Syria is spreading to Lebanon. NPR's Rima Marrouch attended Mohamad Chatah's funeral in Beirut Sunday and sent us this report.

Amidst tight security, the former Lebanese Ambassador to the United States Mohamad Chatah was laid to rest today in Beirut.

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Parallels
1:44 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

Years Of Turmoil Weigh On Beirut As Syria Strains Lebanon

Lebanese security forces and firefighters inspect the scene of a car bomb explosion that rocked central Beirut on Friday.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 2:54 pm

As satellite trucks were pulling up to the site of a massive car bomb in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, on Friday, Jihad Kalaajii was quietly salvaging what he could from his antique shop, loading 300-year-old framed calligraphy and volumes of Islamic poetry into the back seat of his car.

"These things show what we were before," he says, gesturing to one of the 100-year-old manuscripts. "And imagine where we are now; imagine the degradation."

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