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"Ryan Lochte is too much with us," William Wordsworth might have written if he were covering the Summer Olympics in Rio.

Okay, I admit it: William Wordsworth would never have written that. But that's the sentiment that hung over Rio this week, as the temporary community that the Olympics creates every two years found itself unexpectedly distracted from its normal duty of watching talented and dedicated people introduce their dreams to Olympic reality.

Snark Aside, Julie Klausner Says 'Difficult People' Is Inspired By Love: Klausner plays an unsuccessful comic who quips about celebrities in her Hulu series. She says that she and her co-star Billy Eichner bonded over their shared love of show business and pop culture.

'War Dogs' Puts A Satirical Spin On The Business Of War: Todd Phillips' new comedy, which is loosely based on a true story, follows two 20-somethings from Miami who become international arms dealers. Critic John Powers calls War Dogs "jauntily enjoyable."

Since a coup attempt just over a month ago failed to dislodge the government of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, his government has launched a sweeping purge that has impacted tens of thousands over a wide cross section of Turkish society.

More than 40,029 people have been detained and 20,355 arrested since the coup attempt on July 15, Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said in a televised interview on Wednesday. And while many of them have been released, "a total of 5,187 are still remanded in custody."

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

We here at WAIT WAIT... do what we do for one reason, and it has nothing to do with you. It's because we get to talk to famous people who otherwise would never give us the time of day.

(LAUGHTER)

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KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. And here is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill.

(APPLAUSE)

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Lastly, let's listen back to an interview that is on point for a disaster of a year. We talked to Craig Fugate, who runs the Federal Emergency Management Agency back in May. And I asked him about his qualifications for the job.

It looks like it could be a cartoon character, but it's real. And this little squid is making waves on the internet.

Researchers from the Nautilus exploration vessel were cruising along the deep sea floor off California's coast when they came upon the bright purple creature with giant, stuffed-animal-like eyes.

"Whoa!" they exclaim in unison.

"It looks fake," one says. And those googly eyes? "It looks like they just painted them on," another says, to peals of laughter.

Firefighters are gaining ground on the aggressive Blue Cut wildfire in Southern California's San Bernardino National Forest that has destroyed nearly 100 homes and more than 200 other structures.

It's one of several major fires impacting the drought-stricken state. And as NPR's Kirk Siegler tells our Newscast unit, hundreds of the 80,000 put under evacuation notice are now cleared to return home, but "controlling a blaze like this will take weeks." He explains:

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and in The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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FARAI CHIDEYA, HOST:

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The massive container ships that ply the high seas bring us pineapples and mangoes in winter, and computers and cheap t-shirts all year round. But the shipping industry is a volatile, cyclical and ferociously competitive business. There are good years and bad years.

And then there's this year.

When Scott Gatz and his husband decided to become fathers several years ago, pursuing parenthood meant finding both an egg donor and a surrogate to help them conceive a baby. Their first round of in vitro fertilization produced seven healthy embryos. One of those embryos was successfully transferred to their surrogate's womb, resulting in their son Matthew, who is now 6-years-old.

While the San Francisco couple feels their family is now complete, they are still in a quandary over what to do with their six remaining embryos — what they call their "maybe babies."

Matchmaking in the U.S. has gotten truly weird. One of the latest entrants into the business is Smell Dating, a New York-based company that asks clients to wear a T-shirt for three days — without bathing! — so swatches of the fabric can be sent to prospective partners. The idea is that folks sniff and, if they like the smell, pursue a date.

For voters dissatisfied with both major party candidates, there are a few other options. There's Green Party candidate Jill Stein, Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson, and a lesser known late arrival to the scene — Evan McMullin.

McMullin is running as an independent with support from the #NeverTrump movement. He has been a vocal critic of Donald Trump — and he's seen as a conservative alternative to candidate. He has blasted Trump as personally unstable on his website and "a real threat to our Republic."

It's a story that might sound familiar: A promising U.S. men's 4x100m relay team was disqualified from a marquee race because of a bad baton exchange. Team member Tyson Gay calls it both weird and bad luck.

In fact, in a post-race interview that lasted less than 3 minutes, Gay used the word "weird" no less than seven times to describe how this race went for the Americans.

A federal judge has ordered Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton to answer written questions posed by a conservative watchdog group about her use of a private email server while she was secretary of state. That means she will not have to sit in a lengthy deposition and answer questions from lawyers during the campaign.

As NPR's Carrie Johnson reports for our Newscast unit,

Federal police in Mexico murdered 22 suspected cartel members during a raid last year and manipulated the crime scene to hide the extrajudicial killings, according to authorities there.

Mexico's Human Rights Commission said Thursday that of 42 suspects killed in a May 2015 raid, near the small town of Tanhuato, more than half were arbitrarily killed by police, with many shot in the back, NPR's Carrie Kahn tells our Newscast unit.

This Weekend, Water Voles Are Making A Splash In England

Aug 19, 2016

The water vole — once a common creature in the British countryside — hasn't been seen in the U.K.'s Yorkshire Dales for more than 50 years. But starting this weekend, the endangered animals might be making a comeback.

When scientists tallied the temperature readings from around the world last month, this is what they discovered:

"July, 2016 was the warmest month we have observed in our period of record that dates back to 1880," says Jake Crouch, a climate scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

And July wasn't a freak occurrence, he notes. The past 10 years have seen numerous high temperature records.

A microscopic parasite is ravaging the fish population of the Yellowstone River in Montana prompting state officials to ban water-based recreation along a 183-mile stretch of the river and all of its tributaries.

The state's Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks announced the closure, which extends from Yellowstone National Park's northern boundary at Gardiner to the Highway 212 bridge in Laurel.

Can one photo help end a war?

That's what people are wondering about the image of a little Syrian boy covered head to toe in a thick layer of dust, his face bloodied, as he sits in a bright orange chair.

On the same day Donald Trump was touring areas of Louisiana affected by record flooding, the White House announced President Obama will be heading to Louisiana, too.

Here was the White House's statement released Friday afternoon:

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