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12:54 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

Dispatch From One Of The Philippines' Hardest-Hit Areas In

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Typhoon Haiyan swept to the Philippines with nearly 200 mile per hour winds. Thousands are now feared dead. Save the Children's Lynette Lim was in one of the hardest-hit areas, Tacloban City, this morning. She joins us now from the capital, Manila. Thanks so much for being with us.

LYNETTE LIM: Not problem.

MARTIN: So describe what you saw. How were conditions in Tacloban City when you left this morning?

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The Two-Way
11:54 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Doctors OK Return Of Argentine President Cristina Fernández

Argentine President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner.
Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 1:30 pm

A month after undergoing surgery for a blood clot in her brain, Argentine President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner has received the OK from doctors to return to some presidential duties on Monday.

Reuters reports:

"Fernandez was given the go-ahead after tests on Friday night, but would not be allowed to travel by airplane for the next 30 days, government spokesman Alfredo Scoccimarro said.

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The Two-Way
10:10 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Oops! Minnesota Wins Rivalry Trophy, Then Breaks It

Minnesota Players carry an intact Governor's Victory Bell trophy after defeating Penn State 24-10 in an NCAA college football game in Minneapolis on Saturday.
Ann Heisenfelt AP

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:14 am

It started off great: Minnesota won its fourth consecutive Big Ten game for the first time in 40 years when it beat Penn State 24-10 on Saturday.

Then, they were handed the Governor's Victory Bell trophy and they were so excited, they broke it. Oops.

Via SB Nation here's a gif of the moment:

ESPN says the Gopher's 8-2 season is the Big Ten's surprise this year. They explain:

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The Two-Way
9:05 am
Sun November 10, 2013

2 Dead, 22 Injured In Houston-Area Party Shooting

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 6:32 pm

Two people were killed and 22 people were injured late Saturday near Houston when gunfire erupted at a birthday party.

The Houston Chronicle reports most of the injured were between 17- and 20-years-old, and the party was billed on Twitter as an 18th birthday celebration. The Chronicle reports:

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Hague: A Deal With Iran Is 'On The Table' And 'Can Be Done'

International negotiators, including Secretary of State John Kerry and U.K. Foreign Minister William Hague, in Geneva for talks on Iran's nuclear program.
Christophe Bott AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 9:53 am

Despite the fact that a marathon negotiating session over Iran's nuclear program came up empty, international diplomats tried to put a positive spin on reaching a deal on Iran's nuclear program.

U.K. Foreign Minister William Hague told the BBC:

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National Security
8:10 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Why Does The NSA Keep An EGOTISTICALGIRAFFE? It's Top Secret

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:54 pm

What do the following words have in common?

SHARKFINN
KEYSTONE
DISHFIRE
TWISTEDPATH

The answer? They're all NSA code words.

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor, leaked thousands of documents about some of the most secretive programs run by the U.S. government. So secret, they're all given classified names.

You may have heard of PRISM, the name of the secret NSA program that vacuums up Internet communications. Turns out just about everything else at the world's biggest spy agency has its own code word.

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Author Interviews
7:34 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Stories Probe The Hidden Grievances Of Class

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:54 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Author Russell Banks is known for his clear-eyed explorations of hardship. His books probe some of the starker, sadder parts of the human experience. So, it's maybe not surprising that his sixth short story collection titled "A Permanent Member of the Family" begins in a dim, chilly room.

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Sports
7:34 am
Sun November 10, 2013

In College Football, Offense Is Flashy, But Defense Wins The Game

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:54 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin, and it's time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: The Bears - the Baylor University Bears that is - well, they did some trouncing this past week. They beat Oklahoma 41 to 12 on Thursday. And this trouncing got our own Mike Pesca thinking whether this season could be a big moment not just for Baylor but for every great college offense going forward forever, till the end of time. Good morning, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: A referendum, if you will.

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Asia
7:34 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Thousands Feared Dead In Philippines After Super Typhoon

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:54 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Typhoon Haiyan swept to the Philippines with nearly 200 mile per hour winds. Thousands are feared dead. Aaron Aspi is a communications officer with World Vision Philippines, a Christian relief organization. And he joins me now from the island of Cebu.

Thank you so much for being with us.

AARON ASPI: Yes. Thank you.

MARTIN: So can you just tell us what you have seen since the storm has hit?

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The Sunday Conversation
5:15 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Nazi Hunter Dedicates Career To Pursuing Justice

Eli Rosenbaum's team has investigated and prosecuted more than 1700 Nazi cases.
Department of Justice

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:54 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

More than 65 years after World War II, many Nazis are living out their lives in quiet retirements. The crimes scenes are, for the most part, cold. But Eli Rosenbaum is hot on the trail. He and his team at the Justice Department are Nazi hunters. They track down Nazis who moved to the U.S. after the war, and deport them.

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Music Lists
5:15 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Cumbia: The Music That Moves Latin America

Dancers move to cumbia during a Carnival parade in Barranquilla, Colombia in Feb. 2012.
Luis Acosta AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 4:19 pm

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Commentary
5:12 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Mallomars: The Cookie Everyone Likes To Hoard

Mallomars

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 11:24 am

Mallomars turn 100 years old this month. Over the years, the chocolatey marshmallow treat has gathered a cultlike following. For those who have yet to discover Mallomars, take heed — you may soon have a new addiction.

It's Mallomar season right now, which may seem strange since Mallomars are commercially packaged cookies, not apples. But the round graham crackers topped with marshmallow and covered in dark chocolate are actually packaged seasonally.

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The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later
5:10 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Inconsistencies Haunt Official Record Of Kennedy's Death

Jacqueline Kennedy (center), with Edward and Robert Kennedy on either side, watches the coffin of President John F. Kennedy pass on Nov. 25, 1963.
Keystone/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 1:03 pm

The first thing T. Jeremy Gunn says when you ask him about President John F. Kennedy's assassination is, "I'm not a conspiracy theorist. I don't have a theory about what happened."

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The Two-Way
1:50 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Thousands Feared Dead After Typhoon Haiyan

Residents rest outside a stadium used as an evacuation center in Tacloban, Leyte province, central Philippines on Sunday after devastating Typhoon Haiyan hit the city on Friday.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:16 pm

The vicious typhoon that raged through the center of the Philippines appears to have killed hundreds, if not thousands of people, and officials were reportedly struggling Sunday to distribute aid to survivors left homeless and destitute.

Deaths in the province of Leyte — mainly from drowning and collapsed buildings — could escalate to 10,000, the regional police chief told the AP. The administrator of the province capital, Tacloban, said the toll could climb that high in the city alone.

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National Security
5:23 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Edward Snowden's NSA Revelations Keep Coming

Since June, documents leaked by National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden have produced revelation upon revelation about the nation's top-secret intelligence gathering operations. The latest information, about U.S. spying on foreign leaders, has angered even some dependable U.S. allies. New York Times national security reporter Scott Shane, and Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., a senior member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, discuss the latest Snowden-related leaks.

Around the Nation
5:20 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

In The Heat Of The Foundry, Steinway Piano 'Hearts' Are Made

Sparks fly as Dan Hensley pours liquid iron (at 2575 degrees Farenheit) into the mold for a piano plate destined for Steinway pianos, at O.S. Kelly foundry in Springfield, Ohio.
Noah Adams NPR

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 2:10 pm

The Steinway piano company has a new owner. This fall, the investment firm Paulson & Co. — led by billionaire John Paulson — spent about $500 million and bought all of Steinway & Sons, the venerated piano maker.

The deal includes a foundry in Springfield, Ohio, where the Steinway pianos are born in fire.

The O.S. Kelly Foundry has been making Steinway's plates since 1938. The plate is the cast-iron heart of a piano: It holds the steel wire strings with 40,000 pounds of tension, the company says. It allows vibrations to arise in a concert hall as music.

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The Two-Way
5:17 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Judge OKs Lawsuit That Could Change NCAA Amateurism Concept

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 3:51 pm

A federal judge on Friday issued a ruling that may cause a "fundamental change in scholarship rules and the concept of amateurism" in NCAA basketball and football, USA Today reports.

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U.S.
5:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach

A wheelchair is among debris from Superstorm Sandy in the Queens borough of New York on Nov. 13, 2012. A judge ruled Thursday that the city does not have adequate plans for evacuating people with disabilities.
Shannon Stapleton Reuters/Landov

A year after Superstorm Sandy stranded many New Yorkers without power for days, a federal judge has ruled that New York City's emergency plans violate the Americans with Disabilities Act. Those shortcomings, the judge found, leave almost 900,000 residents in danger, and many say the ruling could have implications for local governments across the country.

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World
5:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

In Egypt, Ousted President's Appearance Brings Fresh Clashes

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:17 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

The first democratically elected president of Egypt, Mohammed Morsi, appeared in court on Monday. It was the first time he had been seen in public since the military coup that ousted him in early July. Morsi is being tried on charges of inciting murder and violence. He's become a rallying symbol for his supporters who have been protesting his ouster for more than four months. One person was killed and three others injured in the violence yesterday.

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Author Interviews
5:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

'Days Of Fire': The Evolution Of The Bush-Cheney White House

Charles Dharapak AP

President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney left office on Jan. 20, 2009, ending a consequential — and controversial — administration. The Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the U.S. invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, and Hurricane Katrina were just some of the major events that challenged the administration.

Peter Baker, Chief White House Correspondent for The New York Times, covered those events in real time. But he's now taken a second look at the administration and the relationship at its heart.

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Music Interviews
5:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Can I Kick It? Organ Master Lonnie Smith Can

Dr. Lonnie Smith's In the Beginning, a new album that reimagines the artist's older, out-of-print work, is out now.
Susan Stocker Courtesy of the artist

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Shots - Health News
3:36 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

How A California Law To Encourage Vaccination Could Backfire

Public school student Julio Valenzuela, 11, grimaces as he gets a vaccination before the start of the school in Lynnwood, Calif., on Aug. 27. Vaccines are required for school attendance.
ROBYN BECK AFP/Getty Images

California has a new law that's supposed to get more of the state's children vaccinated against measles, whooping cough and other infectious diseases.

But the law has taken a strange turn on its way to being put into action, one that may instead make it easier for parents to exempt their children from required vaccinations.

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The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Venezuela 'Occupies' An Electronics Chain To Offer Lower Prices

Shoppers loaded with purchases leave a Daka store in Caracas on Saturday.
Juan Barreto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 3:29 pm

First he re-scheduled the Christmas season. Now, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro essentially nationalized an electronics chain in order to "protect the middle class."

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The Two-Way
1:14 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

WATCH: Olympic Torch Makes Its First Space Walk

Video streamed by NASA showed Oleg Kotov and Sergei Ryazanskiy carrying the unlit Olympic torch, bobbing weightlessly at the end of a tether in a darkness dotted by stars.
AP

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 3:24 pm

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The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Iran Nuclear Talks End Without Agreement

Secretary of State John Kerry checks his phone before a meeting with EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs Catherine Ashton and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in Geneva, Switzerland, on Saturday.
Jason Reed AP

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 8:38 pm

(Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET)

When Secretary of State John Kerry cut short a trip to the Middle East on Friday to head to Geneva for negotiations over Iran's nuclear program, it set up expectations that a historic deal may have been at hand.

Today, reality set in and as NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Geneva, the talks ended without an agreement.

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