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The Two-Way
10:57 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Egypt Lifts 3-Month-Old State Of Emergency

Women supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted president Mohamed Morsi take part in a march through the streets of Cairo on November 8, 2013.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 11:44 am

Following a court decision Tuesday, Egypt has lifted a three-month-old state of emergency that was implemented following the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi. The court ordered the state of emergency lifted two days before the government intended to do so.

Egypt's Al-Ahram newspaper reports:

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Shots - Health News
10:56 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Despite Health Law, Uninsured Rely On Prevention Care Patchwork

Footprints mark the spot where immigrants stand while taking eye tests at the Salud Family Health Clinic in Ft. Collins, Colo. The nonprofit provides health care to immigrants seeking asylum and migrant farm workers.
John Moore Getty Images

The federal health law gave a huge boost to insurance coverage for preventive care, mandating that nearly all health plans provide cancer screenings, checkups and, more controversially, contraceptives to people without an extra charge.

But those requirements won't help the 30 million or so people who are expected to remain uninsured despite the law. They will still lean on a patchwork of prevention services whose federal and state funding are anything but certain.

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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Bailout Chief Tapped For Tougher Job: Regulating Derivatives

Meet the new boss? Timothy Massad, left, is to be nominated to replace Gary Gensler, right, as chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.
Official portraits from the Treasury Dept. and CFTC

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 10:33 am

The news, as Bloomberg Businessweek writes, is that:

"Timothy Massad, the Treasury Department official responsible for overseeing the U.S. rescue of banks and automakers after the credit crisis, will be nominated to head the country's top derivatives regulator."

But leave it to The Wall Street Journal to neatly sum things up in a headline:

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The Two-Way
9:58 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Clash Between Garment Workers, Police In Cambodia Turns Deadly

An injured Cambodian worker escapes from riot police in the compound of a Buddhist pagoda in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, on Tuesday. Police fired live ammunition at protesting garment workers outside the capital, injuring at least 20 people and killing a bystander.
AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 11:17 am

Protesting garment workers and riot police clashed Tuesday in Cambodia's capital city, leaving a bystander dead and at least 20 people injured.

Workers from SL Garment Processing (Cambodia) Ltd. Factory were marching toward Prime Minister Hun Sen's residence in Phnom Penh. Workers from the factory have been protesting for months, demanding better pay and working conditions. The factory makes clothes for H&M, Gap and other Western brands.

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The Two-Way
9:54 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Iran Foreign Minister: West Is To Blame For Crumbling Nuclear Deal

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javed Zarif.
Ahmad Al-Rubaye AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 11:03 am

Reacting to a speech in which Secretary of State John Kerry said Iran rejected a "fair" proposal on its nuclear program, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif seemed to put the blame squarely on France.

Zarif said on Twitter that "no amount of spinning" can change what happened during the marathon negotiating sessions in Geneva, but "it can further erode confidence."

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It's All Politics
9:19 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Tuesday Political Mix: Treasury, Tribes, and Christie 2016

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 10:15 am

Good morning.

Before we get to the president's Treasury appointment, continuing Obamacare problems, and a presidential poll du jour, let's turn our thoughts to the people of the typhoon-devastated Philippines.

My colleague, Mark Memmott, provides an update here, which includes a description of the hard-hit city of Tacloban as looking as if a "50-mile tornado" flattened everything.

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Parallels
8:40 am
Tue November 12, 2013

World Headlines: The Financial Cost Of Typhoon Haiyan

Philippines, Philippines Daily Inquirer

The devastation from Typhoon Haiyan could cost the Philippines economy $14 billion, according to one estimate.

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The Two-Way
8:15 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Book News: Spying Concerns Driving Writers To Self-Censor, Study Finds

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Asia
8:15 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Tacloban Took Brunt Of Typhoon Haiyen

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We have two perspectives now on the destruction a typhoon left behind in the Philippines. The first is the view from the air. It comes from U.S. Marine Brigadier General Paul Kennedy, who is coordinating an American military effort to help typhoon survivors. Not long ago, General Kennedy stepped on board a helicopter for what he called reconnaissance. He flew over a wide strip of land struck by one of the strongest storms on record.

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Around the Nation
8:15 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Knish Makers To Be Back In Business By Hanukkah

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with an update on the knish shortage. A factory on New York's Long Island produces the Jewish pastry, often stuffed with potatoes. A fire in September disrupted production. The AP quotes a Knish fan saying, My heart is broken. Now the knish makers say they'll be back in production by the start of Hanukah. In the meantime, a chef at Katz's Delicatessen in Manhattan says of the shortage, quote: Get over it. Get a life. It's just a knish. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
8:13 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Top Stories: Philippines Typhoon Recovery And How To Help

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 10:16 am

Good morning, here are our early stories:

-- 'It Looks Like A 50-Mile Wide Tornado' Hit The Philippines.

-- Typhoon Haiyan: How To Help.

And here are more early headlines:

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The Two-Way
7:55 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Typhoon Haiyan: How To Help

Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the central Philippines coastal village of Capiz got some help Monday when a Filipino military helicopter brought some much-needed food.
Tara Yap AFP/Getty Images

The State Department announced Monday that it is "cooperating with the Philippines Typhoon Disaster Relief Fund established by The mGive Foundation, a U.S. nonprofit organization" to collect donations for victims of the typhoon that struck the Philippines on Friday.

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Books News & Features
7:36 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Agatha Christie's Lost 1954 Work Sold As eBook

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:15 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

A long lost work by Agatha Christie goes on sale today as an e-book. In 1954, Christie wrote "Hercules Poirot and the Green Shore Folly" to help her church raise funds for stained glass windows. It's about a parlor game of murder. The book is filled with references to local places and even to Christie's home, perhaps clues about her life. We'll all have to engage those little gray cells.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
7:10 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Typhoon's Death Toll Likely Near 2,500, President Aquino Says

On Tuesday, a boy sat in the debris of destroyed houses in Tacloban, on the eastern Filipino island of Leyte.
Noel Celis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 12:35 pm

  • From the airport in Tacloban: NPR's Anthony Kuhn says Tuesday that "people are very hungry" and some are quite angry.
  • On 'Morning Edition': Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy talks about Typhoon Haiyan and the destruction in the Philippines

Update at 12:30 p.m. ET:

Grim estimates that the death toll in the Philippines from Typhoon Haiyan might be around 10,000 appear to have been "too much," President Benigno Aquino III told CNN Tuesday.

Aquino said that as more information has come in about the devastation, the figure is looking more likely to be between 2,000 to 2,500.

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Politics
5:26 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Affordable Care Act's Website Reflects Law's Complexity

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Its MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. We'll get a look this week at how many people have signed up for health insurance on the new government exchanges. According to the Wall Street Journal, fewer than 50,000 people have obtained coverage so far through the federal website. That's well below the government's original forecasts.

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Middle East
5:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Israel Joins Debate Over Nuclear Talks With Iran

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 8:22 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Asia
5:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Typhoon Devastates Leyte Province

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:15 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Let's get some perspective now on the destruction in the Philippines.

WERTHEIMER: Almost any death toll we might give today would be unreliable. But we do know that hundreds of thousands of people who survived the storm are now living without shelter. They now face the challenge of finding basics like food and water.

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Television
3:08 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Comcast Deal Puts New Minority-Run Channels In Play

El Rey, which will be targeting a young Latino audience, is being spearheaded by filmmaker Robert Rodriguez, shown at the premiere of his recent film Machete Kills in October.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Rapper and producer Sean "Diddy" Combs, director Robert Rodriguez, and basketball legend Magic Johnson each now has his own new cable TV networks. Their channels were part of a merger deal Comcast made with the FCC to give a shot to new networks owned by African Americans, Latinos and others.

Last month, Combs threw on his classic Puff Daddy alias to welcome millennial viewers to his new music network, Revolt.

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Parallels
3:07 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Tripoli Zoo Sees Different Kind Of Cage — One With Migrants

Illegal immigrants captured in the Libyan coastal city of Surman are held at a temporary prison in an eastern district of Tripoli, Libya, on Oct. 19.
Hamza Turkia Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 1:34 pm

Gun-toting militiamen man the steel gate that leads into the Tripoli zoo. A sign promises a garden of animals. Inside, there are paths that meander through a maze of cages and animal habitats. Monkeys climb trees; hippos submerge themselves in water and lions lounge in the heat.

Just a few hundred yards away, there's a different kind of cage: Inside there are people — migrants waiting to be deported or to prove they are in Libya legally.

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Environment
3:06 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Key West Awash With Plans For Rising Sea Level

A cyclist rides past buckled asphalt in Key West, Fla., after Hurricane Wilma in 2005. Key West experienced widespread flooding with the storm surge.
Lynne Sladky AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:00 pm

Florida — especially South Florida — is very flat and very low, and in places like Miami Beach and Key West, buildings are just 3 feet above sea level. Scientists now say there may be a 3-foot rise in the world's oceans by the end of the century.

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Reporter's Notebook
3:04 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Dwindling Middle Class Has Repercussions For Small Towns

When reporter Kelly McEvers stepped off the train in Lincoln, Ill., she asked, "What happened to my hometown?"
Kelly McEvers NPR

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 2:23 pm

My parents moved away from Lincoln, Ill., two decades ago, when I was in college. I hardly ever get back there. But my mom still works in Lincoln, and it was to Lincoln I headed to meet her this fall, after returning to the U.S. from the Middle East.

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Parallels
3:03 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Photos Reveal Harsh Detail Of Brazil's History With Slavery

A lady with two slaves, in Bahia, Brazil, 1860.
Moreira Salles Institute Archive

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 10:25 am

Brazil was the last place in the Americas to abolish slavery — it didn't happen until 1888 — and that meant that the final years of the practice were photographed.

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Shots - Health News
3:02 am
Tue November 12, 2013

The Case Against Brain Scans As Evidence In Court

When researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College scanned teenage brains, they found that the area that regulates emotional responses has to work harder to keep impulses in check.
Courtesty Kristina Caudle Developmental Neuroscience

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:39 pm

It's not just people who go on trial these days. It's their brains.

More and more lawyers are arguing that some defendants deserve special consideration because they have brains that are immature or impaired, says Nita Farahany, a professor of law and philosophy at Duke University who has been studying the use of brain science in court.

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Shots - Health News
3:01 am
Tue November 12, 2013

WHO Rates Typhoon's Medical Challenges "Monumental"

A woman comforts a pregnant relative suffering labor pains at a makeshift birthing clinic in typhoon-battered city of Tacloban, Philippines on Nov. 11.
Erik de Castro Reuters /Landov

Images of the swath of devastation wrought by Typhoon Haiyan in the central Philippines are reminiscent of the tsunami's aftermath in Banda Aceh, Indonesia nearly a decade ago.

And indeed, the World Health Organization grades the great typhoon of 2013 as a Category 3 disaster – its most severe category.

"The scale [of the typhoon's damage] is huge," Dr. Richard Brennan of the World Health Organization tells Shots. "It's monumental. This is one of the biggest emergencies we've dealt with in some time."

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Parallels
2:58 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Will Colombia's Gamble On Medical Tourism Pay Off?

A billboard announces discounts on cosmetic treatments in a street of Cali, Valle del Cauca department, Colombia. In recent years the country has been building facilities specifically designed for medical tourists.
Luis Robayo AFP/Getty Images

International medical tourism is big business worldwide. Countries like India and Thailand lead the way as top destinations for people looking for high quality care at a fraction of the cost back home.

Lately, countries closer to the U.S. are also trying to break into the market — such as Colombia — which until recently was better known for drug trafficking than nose jobs.

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