Associated Press

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Highmark Health says Allegheny Health Network will build a state-of-the-art cancer institute at Pittsburgh's Allegheny General Hospital as part of a $200 million investment in cancer care.

The health network says about a half-dozen more community cancer treatment centers will be added in the region over the next two years. Officials didn't release the locations of the centers, which will bring as many as 175 health care jobs to western Pennsylvania, but said they would offer medical and radiation oncology care.

Matt Rourke / AP

Prosecutors' case against Bill Cosby drew toward a close Friday with the jury hearing the comedian's damaging, decade-old testimony about giving quaaludes to women he wanted to have sex with.

Testifying under oath in 2005, the TV star said he had obtained several prescriptions for the now-banned sedative in the 1970s but didn't take them himself, according to the deposition read to the jury.

"When you got the quaaludes, was it in your mind that you were going to use these quaaludes for young women that you wanted to have sex with?" Cosby was asked.

"Yes," he said.

Maranie Staab / Facebook

Pictures of young refugees from the war-torn countries of Syria and Iraq have been defaced with spray paint at Pittsburgh's Three Rivers Arts Festival.

Journalist Maranie Staab, of Pittsburgh, is currently in Iraq photographing the ongoing crisis there in Mosul. She posted a photo of the defaced images and a message for the vandal or vandals on Facebook: "If the person that did this happens to see this, I would welcome the opportunity to speak to you about these kids."

The two defaced pictures showed refugee children. The vandals X-ed out their faces with spray paint.

Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

Pennsylvania's state treasurer and auditor general are warning lawmakers that the state government's worsening long-term deficit may require it to borrow money from an outside lender to prop up routine budgeted operations.

Wednesday's letter to lawmakers says the state may need to borrow as much as $3 billion while its main bank account has a negative balance for eight months between July and next April.

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Clarion University's president says she's stepping down at the end of the next academic year.

Karen Whitney has been president of the state-owned school for eight years. The school about 70 miles northeast of Pittsburgh has about 5,200 students.

The school is one of several in the 14-school State System of Higher Education that's struggling with declining enrollment. Clarion's enrollment has dropped 29 percent since 2010.

Whitney is the longest-tenured president in the state system.

The resignation announced Monday is effective June 30, 2018.

Carnegie Mellon University

After four years at the helm of Carnegie Mellon University, president Subra Suresh will step down at the end of the month.

The former National Science Foundation director announced his resignation Thursday in an open letter to the campus community.

Brad Bower/Matt Rourke / AP

Penn State's former president and two other ex-administrators were sentenced Friday to at least two months in jail for failing to report a child sexual abuse allegation against Jerry Sandusky a decade before his arrest engulfed the university in scandal and brought down football coach Joe Paterno.

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

Five insurers are seeking an average 9 percent increase in rates for health coverage in Pennsylvania through the federal Healthcare.gov marketplace in 2018, a significant drop from this year's increase.

The state Department of Insurance said Thursday that proposals filed before last week's deadline could still change, and won't be approved until just before open enrollment starts in the fall.

However, Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller warned that an effort by the Trump administration or Congress to undermine the marketplaces could drive up premiums.

Keith Srakocic / AP

PPG Industries is retreating from its attempt to take over AkzoNobel after repeated refusals to negotiate by the Dutch chemicals company.

There has been an aggressive push to consolidate in the industry because of falling revenue and thin margins.

DuPont and Dow are attempting to complete a $62 billion merger. Swiss specialty chemicals maker Clariant and Huntsman Corp in Texas recently announced their intent to become a single company with a market value of almost $14 billion.

Pennsylvania DEP

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection is warning residents about dangerously high levels of radon.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that may cause up to 21,000 lung cancer deaths a year nationally.

A spokesperson for the agency says he could not share which area is affected.

The agency says at least one home has a radon level 25 times higher than recommended. In a letter sent to one resident, the agency says Pennsylvania generally has "some of the highest radon values in the country."

Douglas Bovitt / AP

Granite from a Philadelphia park that was a skateboarding mecca, though for a long stretch an illegal one, is being put to new use at a skate park being built nearly 4,000 miles away.

Slabs from the city's famed LOVE Park, named for Robert Indiana's LOVE sculpture, are being shipped to the city of Malmo, Sweden.

Malmo's skateboarding coordinator told KYW-TV that the granite will be used for a project he says will "rock the skateboarding world."

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A Pennsylvania man is in the money after setting a record on "The Price is Right."

Ryan Belz, of Millerton, was wildly enthusiastic just to get called on stage in the episode that aired Thursday. His unbridled excitement only grew from there.

In the end, the Penn State graduate set a record by winning $31,500 in one of the TV show's most popular games, Plinko.

Rich Moffitt / AP

Officials anticipate more than 2 million vehicles will use the Pennsylvania Turnpike during the Memorial Day holiday weekend.

Officials say the busiest time for travel will be Friday afternoon and Monday evening.

The turnpike will suspend maintenance work and have all lanes open between 5 a.m. Friday and 11 p.m. Tuesday.

Officials say state police on the turnpike investigated 69 crashes which resulted in seven injuries during Memorial Day weekend last year.

Ted S. Warren / AP

Pennsylvania lawmakers on Wednesday voted overwhelmingly for a bill designed to comply with federal identification standards for people who want to fly or enter federal facilities.

The House passed the Real ID bill 190-1, and Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf said he will sign it.

The measure gives residents the option to obtain a driver's license or other ID that meets the rules of a 2005 federal law enacted in response to the Sept. 11 terror attacks. Residents would also be allowed to get a noncompliant, traditional driver's license or ID.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

The images of people helping one another in the wake of the deadly bombing of an Ariana Grande concert in England has prompted one writer to pay tribute to public television's "Mister Rogers" for the upcoming 50th anniversary of the iconic children's show.

governor.pa.gov

Gov. Tom Wolf says he'll nominate his insurance commissioner, Teresa Miller, to lead a new agency overseeing public health and human services programs.

Wolf said Tuesday that Miller would lead the proposed Department of Health and Human Services. It would be created by combining the departments of Human Services, Health, Aging and Drug and Alcohol Programs.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

UPDATED: 7:31 p.m. on May 23, 2017. 

At the end of the day on Tuesday, 11 jurors had been selected to serve on the panel that will hear Bill Cosby's sexual assault case. Ten of the jurors are white; only one is African American. The court will have new pool of 100 potential jurors to question on Wednesday in an effort to find one additional juror and six alternates.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

*UPDATED: May 22, 2017 at 5:39 p.m.

The panel that will decide Bill Cosby's fate in his sex assault trial began to take shape Monday with the selection of five jurors, three white men and two white women.

The search for 12 jurors and six alternates was expected to take several days. Experts believe lawyers on both sides will be considering race, sex, age, occupation and interests of potential jurors.

Lynne Sladky / AP

Pennsylvania's unemployment rate crept up in April, breaking a four-month streak of declines, as payrolls shrank slightly.

The state Department of Labor and Industry said Friday that Pennsylvania's unemployment rate rose one-tenth of a percentage point to 4.9 percent last month. The national rate was 4.4 percent in April.

The household survey found that the civilian labor force grew by 22,000 in April. Employment rose by 18,000 to a new record high above 6.1 million while unemployment rose by 4,000 to 315,000.

iStock / WITF

As Philadelphia heads for a record year of drug overdose deaths, a task force is proposing a series of actions, from combatting stigma to considering allowing safe sites where drug users could inject heroin.

Mayor Jim Kenney was joined by Governor Tom Wolf in outlining the task force's findings Friday.

Kenney convened the 23-member group in January to focus on developing a plan to combat the city's opioid epidemic.

Matt Nemeth / 90.5 WESA

A man smoking a cigar laced with synthetic marijuana when he caused a chain-reaction crash that killed a University of Pittsburgh professor must spend five to 10 years in prison.

Fifty-year-old David Witherspoon was sentenced by an Allegheny County judge on Thursday after pleading guilty in February to involuntary manslaughter and other crimes in the October 2015 crash that killed 34-year-old Susan Hicks.

Witherspoon and his attorney say he is remorseful and has suffered from mental health issues.

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

A Pennsylvania woman who said her only regret in life was not finishing high school has received an honorary diploma — at age 105.

Theresia Brandl donned a cap and gown Wednesday at her Oakdale nursing home to celebrate, surrounded by four grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren and five great-great-grandchildren.

Brandl attended Stowe High School until she had to drop out to care for her ailing mother. The school was later merged with a nearby school, forming Sto-Rox High School, which awarded her the honorary diploma.

Scott Dalton/Invision for Dick's Sporting Goods / AP

Dick's Sporting Goods has cut 160 jobs in the Pittsburgh-area, most at its Store Support Center in nearby Findlay Township.

The retailer announced the cuts along with its first-quarter earnings on Tuesday.

The company says it's investing in its online businesses, including its website and Team Sports HQ business that focuses on team sports customers at the high school level and below.

Mark Nootbaar / 90.5 WESA

Pennsylvania primary voters are picking candidates for open seats on the state's appeals courts Tuesday, the only statewide contests on the spring primary ballot.

Eighteen people are running for Superior Court and Commonwealth Court, while the two major parties each have a single candidate for an opening on the state Supreme Court.

Five Democrats and five Republicans are competing for four nominations to serve on Superior Court, a busy mid-level appeals court that takes criminal, civil and family court appeals from counties.

Marcus Charleston / 90.5 WESA

Allegheny County could become the first in the state to require all children to be tested for high lead levels in their blood.

The county Board of Health on Wednesday unanimously recommended the proposal, which would require two tests, around ages 1 and 2. The regulation must be approved by the county council and County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. It would take effect next January.

Director Karen Hacker said she believes testing is necessary, because most homes in the county were built before lead was banned in paint.

Matt Nemeth / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh public safety officials are trying to determine why a rain-activated gate failed to automatically stop traffic from entering a low-lying roadway where four people died in an August 2011 flash flood.

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation installed the $450,000 system in 2012, but it's now operated and maintained by the city. The system uses rain sensors that can trigger three swinging-arm gates and several lighted caution signals meant to keep motorists off Washington Boulevard.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

Utility companies were working to restore power to hundreds of people still without electricity a day after severe storms swept through Pennsylvania, downing trees, power lines and possibly spawning several small tornadoes.

The National Weather Service in Pittsburgh says investigators will be heading to Butler, Clarion and Forest counties to determine whether tornadoes touched down Monday afternoon.

Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

Socialists, immigration advocates and others are planning May Day demonstrations across the state.

Organizers including Make the Road Action in PA say hundreds of immigrants will protest Trump Administration immigration policies at Pennsylvania's capitol.

Similar groups are planning two marches in Pittsburgh, including one starting at the City-County Building's steps at 2 p.m.

Dave Martin / AP

A man has been cited for disorderly conduct after police say he "freaked out" when he saw a Confederate flag displayed in a Pennsylvania hotel window as part of a Civil War-themed wedding.

The (Easton) Express-Times says police charged the man with making the disturbance at the Hotel Bethlehem on Saturday. His name wasn't immediately released.

Police Chief Mark DiLuzio says the man was cited for "freaking out, screaming and yelling" and creating a "very aggressive and disorderly scene."

Matt Rourke / AP

Sentencing has been scheduled for three former top officials at Penn State University who were convicted of child endangerment in the Jerry Sandusky molestation scandal.

Former university president Graham Spanier, former vice president Gary Schultz and former athletic director Tim Curley will be sentenced June 2 in Harrisburg.

Curley and Schultz pleaded guilty to misdemeanor child endangerment. Spanier went to trial and was convicted in March. His lawyer said he will appeal.

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