Associated Press

The Associated Press is one of the largest and most trusted sources of independent newsgathering, supplying a steady stream of news to its members, international subscribers and commercial customers. AP is neither privately owned nor government-funded; instead, it's a not-for-profit news cooperative owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members.

U.S. Air Force

A Vietnam War veteran has finally received medals for his service after 45 years of waiting.

Francis McKenna was presented with the National Defense Service Medal, the Air Force Good Conduct Medal, the Air Force Longevity Service Award, the Vietnam Service Medal and a Vietnam Gallantry cross during a ceremony in Tarentum, about 20 miles northeast of Pittsburgh, according to The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

R. Baer and S Kovac / Citizen CATE Experiment via AP

A Pennsylvania school district says children won't be let outside for recess during the Aug. 21 solar eclipse because of the potential harm to students who look at the sun.

The Cumberland Valley School District sent a letter to parents Monday saying the decision was made after consulting the district's physician.

The letter says district officials recognize that the opportunity to view an eclipse is rare, but the safety of students is more important.

NASA officials recommend viewing the eclipse through specially-made glasses to prevent eye damage.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

The Federal Aviation Administration has awarded a $12.3 million grant to renovate part of Pittsburgh International Airport.

The grant will go toward a deicing pad that has been in operation since 1993. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports the renovation will include new pavement and piping.

Deicing is done during winter months to remove ice and snow from planes before takeoff.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

Pennsylvania wildlife officials say a bald eagle that is suffering from lead poisoning is in guarded condition.

The bird was letting people get close to it on a wildlife trail near Apollo over the weekend. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reports it was taken to a wildlife center in Saegertown, where blood tests confirmed it had lead poisoning.

Marcus Charleston / 90.5 WESA

The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pennsylvania's largest health system, says it has reached a deal to acquire Pinnacle HealthSystem of Harrisburg.

It's expected to be completed Sept. 1 if it meets regulatory approval.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports the two health systems have been working on the deal since March.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

A cancer patient says a Southwest Airlines employee went above and beyond to help track down her missing luggage that contained important medication.

Stacy Hurt says she called customer service July 23 at Pittsburgh International Airport after her luggage failed to arrive on a flight from Nashville.

She was panicking because the bag contained medication that helps her with the side effects of chemo for her colon cancer. It also had sentimental items like a rosary and a lucky T-shirt. She was worried it wouldn't arrive in time for her chemotherapy appointment the next day.

Google Maps

A state police forensics unit has searched the former home of a Pennsylvania woman who's been missing since 1989.

Sunbury police Chief Tim Miller announced in June that the investigation had been reopened when crews were seen removing concrete from a home in Milton.

On Wednesday night, the state police accompanied Sunbury police to a home in that town where Barbara Miller once lived.

Miller was 30 when she attended a wedding in Milton in June 1989 and was never seen again.

Keith Srakocic / AP

Eighteen members of a SWAT team are OK after they were exposed to a deadly chemical during a raid early Wednesday, Pittsburgh police said.

As the SWAT team entered the West End home, a table covered with powered drugs was overturned, sending what authorities believed to be a dangerous synthetic opioid called fentanyl wafting into the air, according to a criminal complaint.

Google Maps

Pittsburgh police say they've taken two juveniles into custody for throwing rocks onto vehicles from an overpass above Route 65.

Several vehicles called 911 to report their cars being hit with rocks or other items about 9:30 p.m. Tuesday.

One motorist says cars were forced to slow down because of a broom left in one lane of travel. It's not immediately clear if the youths who threw the rocks also threw the broom or placed it there so cars would slow down and become easier targets.

WPXI / via AP

Most of approximately 1,000 displaced Bedford County residents were allowed to return to their homes this weekend after a train derailed last week and caught fire.

Tests on air quality led the railroad company CSX, an incident management team and environmental specialists to decide that it was safe to reduce the evacuation zone to a limited area immediately surrounding the derailment site in Hyndman, about 100 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, a CSX spokesman said Saturday.

U.S. Department of Education / Flickr

The American Civil Liberties Union is again threatening to sue a Pennsylvania school district for allegedly failing to enroll refugees as students.

The ACLU in February sent a warning letter to the Harrisburg Area School District on behalf of four students. The district enrolled the students in March.

Mel Evans / AP

Pennsylvania's state treasurer has authorized a short-term $750 million line of credit to keep the state's general fund from dipping into negative territory.

Treasurer Joe Torsella says the state hasn't had to borrow that much so early in the fiscal year in 25 years.

Torsella, a Democrat who took office in January, is urging legislators to "pass a responsible revenue package."

Matt Rourke / AP, file

A gas driller says the water in a northeastern Pennsylvania village does not pose a threat to "human health and the environment."

Cabot Oil and Gas Corp. released a statement Thursday after learning that government scientists are collecting water samples from about 25 homes in Dimock, where some residents continue to blame the driller for contaminating their drinking water.

Government scientists collected water samples this week from about 25 homes in Dimock, a tiny crossroads about 150 miles north of Philadelphia.

Patrick Semansky / AP, file

About 1,000 residents of a small Pennsylvania town spent the night in area hotels following a freight train derailment and fire that forced their evacuation.

Bedford County public safety crews and workers from CSX, the train's owner, helped residents in Hyndman retrieve pets and prescription medicines after they were ordered out of their homes Wednesday. Hyndman is about 100 miles southeast of Pittsburgh.

At least 32 rail cars derailed, some containing hazardous materials.

Matt Slocum / AP

Time is running out for motorists who have outstanding toll violations with the Pennsylvania Turnpike.

A partial toll amnesty program ends at 7 p.m. Friday.

Toll bills and violations newer than 60 days can be settled by paying the outstanding toll amount in full and other fees will be forgiven. Violations older than 60 days may be paid in full with a portion of the outstanding fees forgiven.

Susan Walsh / AP

Republican U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta of Pennsylvania, a crusader against illegal immigration, is telling GOP officials and activists that he's decided to run for the U.S. Senate seat now held by Democrat Bob Casey.

A person familiar with the discussions tells The Associated Press that Barletta began telling party officials of his decision last week.

The person spoke on condition of anonymity Monday because Barletta has not yet made his plans public.

Kristi Jan Hoover / 90.5 WESA

The Trump administration says a Pennsylvania-based coal company has won a contract to supply coal used for heating to Ukraine's state-owned power company.

The deal announced Monday calls for Xcoal Energy and Resources to ship 700,000 tons of thermal coal to the Ukraine to heat homes and businesses. Xcoal is based in Latrobe, Westmoreland County.

The first shipment is expected to leave the Port of Baltimore next month at a cost of $113 per metric ton.

Elise Amendola / AP

A franchise that already controlled two Coca-Cola bottlers in Pennsylvania has snapped up 11 more in the state and West Virginia.

The Erie Times-News reports Abarta Coca-Cola Beverages, of Pittsburgh, has bought Erie's Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Abarta plans to keep all 104 workers there, which supplies Erie, Crawford, Forest, McKean, Potter and Warren counties in northwestern Pennsylvania.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

Robert Pugh says he doesn't like coming back to the area of Pennsylvania that still gives him "goosebumps" 15 years after he and eight other miners were rescued after spending more than three days trapped in a flooded mine.

But he made an exception over the weekend and returned to the Quecreek Mine site for the first time in a decade to see fellow miners and community members — and especially to thank those who had a role in saving his life.

"I want to see some people who rescued me, a lot of people who prayed for me and guys I haven't seen for a long time," he said.

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

Democratic U.S. Sen. Bob Casey easily leads the pack in fundraising as he runs for a third term in next year's election.

Casey reported $5.6 million in his campaign account as of June 30, the latest date for which Senate candidates must disclose campaign finances. That's almost twice what Casey had at the same point while running for his current term.

Gene J. Puskar / AP, File

GE Transportation plans to end most locomotive production at its century-old plant in northwestern Pennsylvania, eliminating about 575 jobs.

GoErie.com reports the work is being transferred by the end of 2018 to Fort Worth, Texas, where workers aren't union members.

The Lawrence Park Township plant, just outside Erie, currently employs more than 2,5f00 workers. Locomotive prototypes will still be produced there.

Richard Simpson, a GE Transportation executive, says the company has to put work at its most competitive location, which doesn't include Erie.

Matt Rourke / AP

The Pennsylvania Senate passed a revenue package to patch a more than $2 billion hole in the state's $32 billion budget for the fiscal year that began July 1. It could face opposition in the House of Representatives before it reaches the desk of Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf, who supported it. Here are details:

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NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

Duquesne School of Law / Facebook

A $7.5 million grant will help Duquesne Law School lead an effort to improve continuing education programs for Pennsylvania's judges, district judges, senior judges and justices.

Duquesne announced Tuesday the donation from alumnus Tom Kline that will create a center for judicial education named for the Philadelphia lawyer.

The state Supreme Court in December imposed a requirement that judges annually complete at least three hours of training in ethics and nine hours on other aspects of their job.

Kathy Willens / AP

A major toy manufacturer plans to hire about 400 new workers to staff a new distribution center in eastern Pennsylvania.

Mattel has opened the 1 million-square-foot center in the Gateway Logistics Park area of Jonestown.

The company will package popular toys including Barbie and Hot Wheels brands at the center, which will also handle Mega Brands and, eventually, Fisher-Price. The company says the center will employ as many as 400 during peak season.

Matt Rourke / AP

Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro plans to announce criminal sexual abuse charges against a western Pennsylvania priest.

Shapiro's office says he'll be in Lower Burrell to announce the charges this afternoon.

It wasn't immediately clear if the priest serves at a parish in that area, and the priest has yet to be identified. Lower Burrell is about 25 miles northeast of Pittsburgh and is located in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Greensburg.

Alex Brandon / AP

A roundup of some of the most popular, but completely untrue, headlines of the week. None of these stories are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked these out; here are the real facts:

NOT REAL: Trump Is Furious After Discovering Gov't Waste

Matt Rourke / AP

Philadelphia's police commissioner is challenging Attorney General Jeff Sessions for blaming immigrants for much of the nation's violent crime.

Commissioner Richard Ross says "young men from here" who are hopeless and dealing with poverty are a bigger problem.

Ross also says he doesn't think local law enforcement "belongs in the immigration business." He says it's tough enough for police to build bonds with local residents without having them worry about their immigration status.

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

Pennsylvania's unemployment rate remained the same in June, as payrolls crept higher.

The state Department of Labor and Industry said Friday that Pennsylvania's unemployment rate was 5 percent last month, the same as in May. The national rate was 4.4 percent in June.

The household survey found that the civilian labor force, employment and unemployment were all relative stable last month.

Brad Bower/Matt Rourke / AP

Two ex-Penn State administrators have begun the work-release portion of their jail sentences on child endangerment convictions stemming from the Jerry Sandusky investigation.

Centre County jail officials tell Pennlive.com that former vice president Gary Schultz and former athletic director Tim Curley surrendered Saturday and spent time in hard cells before moving to dormitory-like soft cells for work release Wednesday.

Google Maps

A former hospital staffer has acknowledged to lying about cancer tests to 124 patients he tested at Penn State Hershey Medical Center.

Sixty-two-year-old Floyd Benko pleaded guilty Wednesday in Harrisburg federal court to false statement charges. The U.S. Attorney's office says Benko lied to patients about following standard operating procedures in regard to genetic tests.

The gene mutation tests are designed to help doctors tailor cancer treatments. Prosecutors say Benko failed to preform mandatory steps in the tests and lied about them.

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