Dave Davies

Dave Davies is a guest host for NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

In addition to his role at Fresh Air, Davies is a senior reporter for WHYY in Philadelphia. Prior to WHYY, he spent 19 years as a reporter and columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News, covering government and politics.

Before joining the Daily News in 1990, Davies was city hall bureau chief for KYW News Radio, Philadelphia's commercial all-news station. From 1982 to 1986, Davies was a reporter for WHYY covering local issues and filing reports for NPR. He also edited a community newspaper in Philadelphia and has worked as a teacher, a cab driver and a welder.

Davies is a graduate of the University of Texas.

On May 25, 1978, a package exploded at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., injuring a security guard. It was the first of a series of 16 bombings that would occur over the next 17 years, killing three people and injuring many others. The suspect in the case, a shadowy figure who frequently used the U.S. mail to send his homemade explosives, became known as the "Unabomber."

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Gene J. Puskar / AP

The day after Pennsylvania, 14 other states and the District of Columbia sued the Environmental Protection Agency over its plan to delay implementation of new clean air standards, the EPA reversed course and says it will implement it on time.

Tales from the American West are marked by heroism, romance and plenty of cruelty. Among those stories, the saga of the Donner Party stands alone — a band of pioneers set out in covered wagons for California, and eventually, stranded, snowbound and starving, resorted to cannibalism.

Brad Larrison / for NewsWorks

 

A Philadelphia judge has refused the request of Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein to do a digital audit of a small fraction of the city's voting machines.

It's the latest setback for Stein's recount effort in Pennsylvania.

Stein's gotten nowhere trying to get a statewide recount of the presidential vote aside from a few instances where individual voters petitioned for recounts in their home precincts. That happened for about 4 percent of Philadelphia's polling places,

Matt Rourke / AP

 

Election officials in Philadelphia will conduct a recount Friday of the presidential vote in 75 of the city's 1,686 precincts, in response to petitions filed by Green Party candidate Jill Stein.

But at a hearing Thursday morning, the city's election board turned down the Stein campaign's request to open up voting machines and look for digital evidence of hacking.

Philadelphia is one of several Pennsylvania counties where partial recounts are happening, the result of precinct-level recount petitions from several hundred voters recruited by the Stein campaign.

Kimberly Paynter / WHYY

 

If Donald Trump's stunning win in Pennsylvania mean it's the season for wealthy outsiders in politics, that can only be good for Paul Addis.

Addis, 63, a former energy executive, is exploring a run for governor in the 2018 Republican primary, where the winner is likely to face incumbent Democrat, Tom Wolf.

State Sen. Scott Wagner, R-York, is a rich, solid-waste magnate who's already running, and there's talk of other self-funding hopefuls across the commonwealth.

Ross Cameron / AP Photo

Attorneys for Green Party candidate Jill Stein will launch a last-minute challenge to Pennsylvania's presidential election results today, and the Hillary Clinton campaign says it will participate to ensure the process is "fair to all sides." 

Lawrence Otter, an election attorney working with the Stein campaign, said the effort will begin with voters in selected precincts filing recount petitions, which county election boards are required to honor. 

Via Wikipedia, Katie McGinty

Pennsylvania's U.S. Senate race this year will likely set a new record for spending, as outside groups pour money into the contest hoping to influence the control of the Senate.

Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

 

Former President George W. Bush is in Philadelphia Friday to raise campaign money for Pennsylvania Republican U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey.

The event at the Union League in Center City includes a "VIP photo session" and a luncheon. It's closed to the media, as are many political fundraisers.

"He's going to raise a lot of money," said insurance executive and GOP fundraiser Manuel Stamatakis, a member of the host committee for the event. "I ask people for money all the time, but I've had people calling me, unsolicited, saying they want to contribute to Pat Toomey."

Pennsylvania's presidential primary is still a month away, but Republican campaigns are starting to focus on the state because it could prove to be a vital store of delegates for the three remaining candidates.

Donald Trump has a narrow path to clinch the 1,237 delegates needed to secure the GOP nomination. Rivals Ted Cruz and John Kasich are now primarily focused on scoring enough delegates of their own to deny Trump a majority of delegates on the first ballot at this summer's Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Who would you turn to to build a temporary city that will come to life for four days, then disappear? That's what planning and managing a national political convention amounts to, and the Democrats have turned to a Pentecostal minister and jigsaw puzzle master with a gift for organization and politics.

The Rev. Leah Daughtry was CEO of the 2008 convention, remembered for Barack Obama's speech in Denver's football stadium. Now the party has turned to her to handle the one in Philadelphia next summer.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Big spending by superPACs has become a fact of life in federal election campaigns, permitting wealthy donors to spend millions to support candidates for president, and increasingly for Congress. Now, superPACs are becoming players in state and local elections as well.

Three superPACs raised and spent more than $10 million total in Philadelphia's mayoral election this year. That's roughly twice the spending of the candidates themselves, who were bound by contribution limits in city election law.