Dave Mistich

Dave Mistich is the Charleston Reporter for West Virginia Public Broadcasting. A native of Washington, West Virginia, Dave can be heard throughout week on West Virginia Public Radio, including during West Virginia Morning and Inside Appalachia. He also anchors local newscasts during Weekend Edition on Saturday mornings and covers the House of Delegates for The Legislature Today.

Since joining West Virginia Public Broadcasting in October of 2012, Dave has produced stories that range from the 2012 general election, the effects of Superstorm Sandy on Nicholas County and a feature on the burgeoning craft beer industry in the state. He has also contributed to NPR's newscasts upon three occasions thus far—covering the natural gas line explosion in Sissonville in December, U.S. Senator Jay Rockefeller's announcement that he won't seek reelection in 2014 and the murder of Mingo County Sheriff Eugene Crum.

In June 2013, his coverage of the Sissionville explosion won an award for Best Breaking News from the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

Before coming to West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Dave worked as a freelancer for various newspapers and magazines locally and around the country, including Relix, The Charleston Daily Mail and PopMatters, where he focused exclusively on critiquing and writing about popular music. 

A graduate of Marshall University’s W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications, Dave holds a Bachelor of Arts in Radio-Television Production & Management.  He is also finishing a Master of Arts Journalism degree there and is hopelessly trying to complete a thesis which focuses on America’s first critically-oriented rock magazine, Crawdaddy!

In elections past, the integrity of the vote was protected by poll workers and election officials. But in 2018 and likely beyond, elections are being protected by people like the anonymous man who works in the basement of the West Virginia Capitol.

He's member of the West Virginia National Guard who is a cybersecurity specialist responsible for monitoring any computer-related threats to the state's elections. Since August of last year, he's been attached full time to the office of Secretary of State Mac Warner.

What was supposed to be a "cooling off" day on Wednesday was anything but at West Virginia's Capitol.

After Gov. Jim Justice and union leaders had announced a deal to end the teacher strike and send educators and service personnel back to the classroom on Thursday, uncertainty forced all of the state's counties to call off school yet again.

The work stoppage that has closed public schools in West Virginia will end Thursday, leaders of teacher and service personnel unions said after meeting with the governor.

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