Katie Blackley

DIGITAL PRODUCER

Katie Blackley is a digital producer for 90.5 WESA, where she writes, edits and generates both web and on-air content for features and daily broadcast. After graduating in 2014, Katie was an editor for KQV 1410 AM in downtown Pittsburgh and did freelance video work for the Civic Light Opera.

She’s passionate about all things Pittsburgh and believes someday she’ll solve the Pittsburgh Protractor Mystery. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA


Driving in Pittsburgh is confusing. The streets aren’t on a grid system and going over the wrong bridge could result in a long, unwelcomed detour.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA


Sunlight beams through the second story of the former Kullman's Bakery on Brownsville Road in Mount Oliver. Leaning against a stainless steel table, cook Jewel Edwards muses about her favorite confections.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

In western Pennsylvania and West Virginia, three towns all share an astronomical feature in their names. None of them have an observatory, and no groundbreaking space discoveries were made in any of them, but the trio of cities, within 200 miles of each other, all begin with the word “star.”

David Cook, of Whitehall, brought the idea to the attention of 90.5 WESA’s Good Question series. He wondered about the origins of Star City, Wv., Star Junction, Pa. and Starbrick, Pa.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Some advocates are worried that recent changes to Pittsburgh’s public transit system could hurt the riders that use it most. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA


Traveling from Forbes Avenue on Duquesne University’s campus to the South 10th Street Bridge, drivers and pedestrians making a right into the Armstrong Tunnel encounter something unusual for a tunnel: a curve.

Oliver Morrison / PublicSource

It’s 7 a.m. and cafeteria worker Leann Andrews is pushing a cart through the bustling hallways of North Hills Middle School. In the cart sit packages of banana, blueberry, and chocolate muffin next to cereal bars and breakfast sandwiches.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA


Alex and Jess Welker sat on a plush tan couch in their McCandless home and recounted their first date. The two tell the story together, going back and forth with details of their earliest interaction.

Jake Savitz / 90.5 WESA

Pasted to the wall of Department of City Planning is a large, colorful map of Pittsburgh. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

When Philadelphian Cyndie Carioli was a new mother in the 1970s, she was like most first time parents: nervous. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

"Carnegie’s Maid" tells the fictional story of an immigrant housekeeper who moves to Pittsburgh and accidentally ends up serving one of the city’s most famous families: the Carnegies.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

*UPDATED

Cars rumble overhead as historian John Schalcosky trudges through crunching snow beneath the 40th Street Bridge in Lawrenceville. Gesturing toward the Allegheny River bank, he flicks on his iPhone flashlight.

Keith Srakocic / AP

*Updated on Monday, Jan. 29 at 3:30 p.m.

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra picked up two Grammys at Sunday night's awards ceremony. 

Miller Library / Pennsylvania Trolley Museum

Our Good Question! series fields a lot of questions around Pittsburgh transit, from the history of streetcars to the creation of light rail. We pulled together a variety of questions for this short history.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

UPDATED: This story was updated at 4:38 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. 

A man who pleaded guilty to stabbing 20 fellow students and a security guard at his suburban Pittsburgh high school will spend at least 23 years in prison with a maximum of six decades.

A judge sentenced 20-year-old Alex Hribal to 23.5 to 60 years in prison and ordered him to pay more than $269,000 in restitution.

OFF 84, Detre Library and Archives / Heinz History Center

The steep drive up P.J. McArdle Roadway takes drivers from the Liberty Bridge to the top of Mt. Washington's scenic overlook. It reveals a stunning view of Pittsburgh’s skyline and three rivers, from the Point State Park Fountain to the Birmingham Bridge. 

Doug Brendel / Heinz History Center

Lewis Marascalco remembers the buzz he and his fellow engineers felt while they were working on a futuristic transportation system everyone was calling “Skybus.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

"Broadcasting from Pittsburgh’s historic South Side, this is 90.5 WESA, Pittsburgh’s NPR news station."

Melissa Majchrzak / US Speedskating

Two Pittsburgh short track speed skaters are on the national Team USA training team, with one qualifying to compete in the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea.

Midnightdreary / Wikimedia Commons

The Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Office is undertaking a study of buildings and spaces that are significant to African American history in the state.

Resonance Works / Facebook

At a small campground somewhere in Appalachia lives a young boy and his mother. They’re poor, with barely enough to eat, a tent as a home and the boy, Amahl, has the use of only one leg.

Keith Srakocic / AP

Details of Pittsburgh’s Amazon headquarters proposal won’t be released to the public because the city signed non-disclosure agreements with private developers.

Dr. Robert Kromos / Attack Theatre

Jimmy Cvetic’s poetry is rough, dark and punchy.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

When entering Knead Community Café in New Kensington, Pa., guests are greeted by a host at the door.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh-area robotics and 3-D printing companies displayed their designs as part of a preview of the Hazelwood Green’s Mill 19 facility.

The former steel mill will soon be the home to the Advanced Robotics for Manufacturing Institute, a public-private partnership between Carnegie Mellon University, community stakeholders and the U.S. Department of Defense.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Affordable housing advocates say they’re concerned the consent agreement reached by the city of Pittsburgh and four neighborhood groups about the former Penn Plaza development site won’t actually help those who need it.

T. Charles Erickson / PigPen Theatre Company/City Theatre

Each night, an old man that lives on a cliff fills up the moon with liquid light. He and his wife have been doing the same routine for so long, they’ve forgotten who they are and why they started filling up the moon in the first place.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Alongside Route 51 by a Denny’s and a Huntington Bank in West Mifflin, there are two round, rust-colored sculptures. There’s no informational plaque, and there are no signs posted.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

On the corner of Penn Avenue and Seventh Street in downtown Pittsburgh, there’s a blue and gold plaque that reads “The Pittsburgh Agreement.”

Allegheny County / Campaign of Mike Dell

Voters in the Eastern municipalities of Allegheny County will chose between a longtime incumbent and an accountant for County Council’s District 8 seat Nov. 7.

Quigley Photograph Archives / Georgetown University Library Booth Family Center for Special Collections, Washington D.C.

Silent film director Lois Weber made more than 200 films between 1908 and 1934, including "The Blot" and "Where Are My Children?" She developed some techniques still used in filmmaking today.

But the Pittsburgh native’s legacy has received little recognition. Now, a new documentary looks at Weber’s life. The film “Yours Sincerely, Lois Weber” was produced by Benjamin Alfonsi, a University of Pittsburgh alum who is bringing the movie to the August Wilson Center on Saturday, Oct. 28 at 3:30 p.m. 

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