Environment
3:30 am
Wed August 6, 2014

Climate Change Keeps Allergy Sufferers Sneezing

Asha Patel, an immunology researcher, uses a Burkard Spore Trap to collect pollen on the roof of Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh.
Asha Patel, an immunology researcher, uses a Burkard Spore Trap to collect pollen on the roof of Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh.
Credit Julie Grant / The Allegheny Front

If even hearing the word “ragweed” makes your eyes water, you might be one the nearly 45 million Americans with seasonal allergies. And allergists say the number of people with sensitivities to ragweed and other plants is growing. Our series on the local impacts of climate change continues, with a look at how higher temperatures are fueling the rise in allergies and asthma.

Jenny Fischer has been taking over-the-counter medication for allergies for a long time. Without it, she suffers cold-like symptoms: a runny nose, sneezing and congestion. An allergy pill usually made it better. But a couple of years ago, things started to get worse.

Read more of this report at the website of our partner The Allegheny Front.