The Increasing Need For Investigative Journalism In An Era Of Alternative Facts

Jan 27, 2017

The Confluence, where the news comes together, is 90.5 WESA’s weekly news program.

Each week reporters, editors and bloggers join veteran journalist and host Kevin Gavin. They’ll go behind the headlines taking an in-depth look at the stories important to the Pittsburgh region.

On this week's edition of The Confluence, a conversation on why the work done by investigative journalists may be more important than ever as the term "alternative facts" enters the lexicon. Last week's Women's March on Washington drew roughly 750,000 participants to the nation's capital. Around the world, marches held in solidarity increased ballooned those estimates to 3.2 million. Now that the march is over, we'll discuss what could be next for the movement. Later in the program, from the Keystone XL pipeline to longwall mining, we look at the week's top environmental news stories. 

Just the Facts

It’s been said you’re entitled to your own opinion, but not your own facts. But have we entered a new era of “alternative facts?” Is there a greater onus on the press to make sure their facts are right given the skeptical eye being placed on the media? We delve into fact checking and the role of investigative journalism with Halle Stockton, managing editor for PublicSource, and Mike Wereschagin, reporter for Lancaster Online's new print-only product, The Caucus.

A Women's March or a movement?

Millions turned out in support and solidarity for Saturday’s Women's March on Washington. With the march over, what’s next for the movement? Joining us are 90.5 WESA reporters Virginia Alvino Young and Megan Harris, who covered the story in Pittsburgh and Washington, D.C., respectively. 

Environmental Issues

From steps taken by President Trump to advancing the Keystone XL pipeline to an environmental judge reversing a DEP decision on longwall mining, it’s been a busy week in environmental news. Joining us to address these stories and what they could mean are Allegheny Front reporter Reid Frazier and StateImpact Pennnsylvania's Harrisburg reporter, Marie Cusick.

More of The Confluence can be heard here.