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Weekdays from 5am to 10am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene

NPR's up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary and coverage of news, politics, arts, sports, and more from around the world and in and around Pittsburgh, hosted locally by 90.5 WESA's Josh Raulerson.

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Business
6:51 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Latino Buying Power Gets Movie Studios' Attention

Instructions Not Included, a film starring and directed by Eugenio Derbez, was made specifically for a Mexican and U.S. Latino audience.
Pantelion Films

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:12 am

One of the surprise movie hits this past weekend was almost entirely in Spanish. Instructions Not Included made an enormous amount of money per screen, more than $22,000, playing in fewer than 350 theaters. The boys in One Direction had the number one film, but they pulled in less than $6000 per screen. That's a huge victory for star Eugenio Derbez, a household name in Mexico, and for Pantelion films, which has been trying to find a Spanish-language hit in the U.S. film market for a few years now.

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Sports
6:50 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Pirates End Decades Of Losing Seasons

The Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Milwaukee Brewers Tuesday night for the team's 81st win of the season. That win guarantees the Pirates will not have a losing season this year — as it has since 1993.

Around the Nation
6:42 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Water Dispute Heightens Tensions Between U.S., Mexico

Mexico and the United States are supposed to share water according to a 70-year-old treaty that aims to protect each nation's needs. But prolonged drought is testing that relationship. Mexico is behind by 38 percent on its deliveries.

Around the Nation
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Las Vegas Gambles On Unique Business Incubator

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:12 am

The Downtown Container Park will set up budding entrepreneurs in repurposed shipping containers. The park will have 35 containers and a bunch of modular cubes like you'd normally see at a construction site — all to house local businesses.

World
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Congress Should Examine Fine Print When Voting On Syria

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And as Congress prepares to vote on authorizing force, Yale Law Professor Stephen L. Carter has some advice.

STEPHEN L. CARTER: The one thing I would strongly recommend is that members of Congress actually read the resolution before deciding whether to vote for it or not.

MONTAGNE: He says it's hard to approve of a president waging war while still limiting the power the president is given.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Middle East
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Obama Considers Training Options For Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama has promised limited military action against Syria. He says missile strikes are not about regime change and there will be no boots on the ground. But even as the Congress debates the president's plans for action, the White House is looking at broader options.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports the president may call on the U.S. military to help build up the Syrian opposition.

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Shots - Health News
3:43 am
Wed September 4, 2013

For Hospital Patients, Observation Status Can Prove Costly

The next bed could cost you a lot if the hospital says you're there on observation.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 9:25 am

If you're on Medicare and you're in the hospital for a few days, you may think you're an inpatient. The hospital may have other ideas. Increasingly, hospitals are placing older patients on "observation status." They may be there for days, but technically they're still outpatients.

This is a big deal for someone on Medicare because follow-up treatment in a nursing home isn't covered unless someone has been an inpatient for at least three days. That's leaving some seniors on the hook for thousands of dollars in nursing home bills.

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Law
3:34 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Is It Legal For Undocumented Immigrant To Practice Law?

Sergio Garcia speaks at The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) news conference on Aug. 27. Garcia, 36, is a law school graduate who passed California's bar examination, but he's living in the United States illegally. California State Bar officials have not issued him a lawyer's license because of his immigration status.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 3:44 pm

On Wednesday, the California Supreme Court holds oral arguments in a case that will determine whether Sergio Garcia, an undocumented immigrant, can become a licensed attorney.

The case has drawn attention from legal groups across the country and comes amid the larger national fight over immigration reform.

On the side of Garcia are the State Bar of California and the California attorney general. Opposing his admission to the bar is the Justice Department, among others.

'This Is The Country I Know'

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The Salt
3:05 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Small Farmers In New England Fear New Food Safety Rules

Joe Buley owns Screamin' Ridge Farm in Montpelier, Vt. He says the FDA's new food safety rules threaten the viability of small New England farm operations like his. Here, Buley harvests cucumbers.
Emily Corwin

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Back in January, the Food and Drug Administration issued two proposed food safety rules to prevent tainted food from entering the food supply.

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Sweetness And Light
2:15 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Why Keep Athletes Eligible But Uneducated?

Ersin Kisacik iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:31 pm

Each football season brings exciting plays and game heroes, but Frank Deford says the real heroes are often overlooked.

As another school year and college football season gets underway, Deford looks at the frustrations and challenges facing educators to keep student athletes eligible.

Click on the audio link above to hear Deford's take on this issue.

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The Two-Way
9:37 am
Tue September 3, 2013

McCain Says Right Strikes Can Hurt Assad's Capabilities

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., met with President Obama on Sunday at the White House.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 1:18 pm

By "taking out Bashar Assad's delivery capabilities of chemical weapons" the U.S. can make it much harder for the Syrian leader to wage war against his people and perhaps level the fighting field or turn it in favor of Assad's opponents, Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona said Tuesday on Morning Edition.

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NPR Story
8:48 am
Tue September 3, 2013

McCain Backs President On Syria Strikes

Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona talks to Steve Inskeep about what he would like to see the U.S. do about Syria.

Around the Nation
6:49 am
Tue September 3, 2013

U.S. Navy Wins Battle Of Lake Erie, Again

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to the U.S. Navy, which won the battle of Lake Erie - again. Sailing ships re-enacted the victory over the British 200 ago during the War of 1812. The Port Clinton News Herald says the 2013 battle turned out the same, but with better technology: people captured the battle scenes on cell phones.

In 1813, the winning commander said we have met the enemy and they are ours. Which is short enough to say on Twitter. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
6:43 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Woman Waits 8 Years To Get Diamond After Chicken Ate It

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. A diamond is forever, luckily, because a chicken only lasts about eight years - which is how long a woman in England is willing to wait to get back a diamond earring, after her pet chicken gulped it down while sitting on her shoulder.

The diamond earring could be removed surgically, but Claire Lennon told "The Telegraph" she worries the 6-month-old chicken wouldn't survive. And her daughter loves the bird so the diamond-wait, for the pet to die naturally.

Around the Nation
5:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Radio Station KYAY Is Lifeline For Apache Tribe

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And on a reservation in Arizona, there's a tiny radio station marking its first year on the air. KYAY is owned by the San Carlos Apache Tribe and it's become a window into this isolated reservation, offering news and entertainment. NPR's Kirk Siegler has been listening.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRADITIONAL APACHE SONG)

KIRK SIEGLER: From a cinder block building in a dusty lot on the edge of San Carlos, comes KYAY 91.1 FM, the voice of the San Carlos Apaches.

LYNN KEY: So, you know, it's KYAY.

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Sports
5:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Nyad Finishes Swimming Goal 35 Years After She First Tried

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The swimmer Diana Nyad has finally accomplished what no other athlete has ever done. She swam 110 miles from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage and she did it at the age of 64. As Nyad emerged from the Gulf of Mexico yesterday, he tongue swollen from swallowing sea water, she had messages for the crowd that greeted her.

DIANA NYAD: One is we should never ever give up. Two is you're never too old to chase your dreams.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Middle East
5:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Iran Weighs Heavily In Debate Over Syria

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

As we've heard, some of the debate over Syria is actually a debate about Syria's ally, Iran. We want to know what Iranian leaders are thinking as the United States contemplates involvement in Syria. And so we've called Scott Peterson, in Istanbul. He's a Christian Science Monitor reporter who's well-known for his coverage of Iran, and author of a book called "Let the Swords Encircle Me," which is about Iran.

Mr. Peterson, welcome to the program.

SCOTT PETERSON: Thank you.

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Environment
3:03 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Pollution, Not Rising Temperatures, May Have Melted Alpine Glaciers

The Alps' largest glacier, Aletsch Glacier, extends more than 14 miles and covers more than 46 square miles.
Wikimedia.org

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 11:28 am

Glaciers in the Alps of Europe pose a scientific mystery. They started melting rapidly back in the 1860s. In a span of about 50 years, some of the biggest glaciers had retreated more than half a mile.

But nobody could explain the glacier's rapid decline. Now, a new study from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory uncovers a possible clue to why the glaciers melted before temperatures started rising: Soot from the Industrial Revolution could have heated up the ice.

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Law
3:02 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Justice Department Tackles Quality Of Defense For The Poor

People wait in line outside the Supreme Court in February. In a landmark decision half a century ago, the justices guaranteed a lawyer for criminal defendants who are too poor to afford one.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 11:37 am

All over the country, lawyers who defend poor people in criminal cases have been sharing their stories about painful budget cuts. Some federal public defenders have shut their doors to new clients after big layoffs. And in many states, the public defense system has operated in crisis for years.

But an unprecedented recent court filing from the Justice Department has cheered the typically overburdened attorneys who represent the poor and could have dramatic implications for the representation of indigent defendants.

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Books
3:01 am
Tue September 3, 2013

For F. Scott And Zelda Fitzgerald, A Dark Chapter In Asheville, N.C.

Zelda Sayre and F. Scott Fitzgerald pose for a photo at the Sayre home in Montgomery, Ala., in 1919, the year before they married.
Bettmann Corbis

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 3:30 pm

Asheville, a mountain town in North Carolina, is known for at least two important native sons: writers Thomas Wolfe, whose 1929 novel Look Homeward, Angel eviscerated some locals, and Charles Frazier, whose 1997 civil war novel Cold Mountain is set in the nearby hills. But there is also a little-known story of another writer — F. Scott Fitzgerald — who, along with his wife Zelda, had devastating connections to the town.

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Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Enough With Baby Talk; Infants Learn From Lemur Screeches, Too

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 9:26 am

New research suggests that 3-month-old human babies can use lemur calls as teaching aids. The findings hint at a deep biological connection between language and learning.

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Around the Nation
6:56 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Long Island Man Legally Changes His Name To Santa Claus

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A Long Island man legally changed his name to Santa Claus. Whatever benefits he may get from that, it did not free him from jury duty. Santa Claus was summoned to court. Santa Claus was put on a jury panel. For this defendant, a jury of his peers included the man who showed up wearing a red dress shirt with a picture of Santa Claus and eight reindeer. Santa could have been among those deciding the trial except the case was dismissed. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
6:50 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Wild Stork Picked Up For Spying In Egypt

A fisherman saw the bird along the Nile River with a suspicious electronic device fixed to its wing. The fisherman made a citizen's arrest. Concerned officials found it was not a spying device, just a wildlife tracker.

Race
4:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Paris Has Been A Haven For African Americans Escaping Racism

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:53 am

The City Of Lights became known as a beacon of freedom and tolerance for African Americans. Paris is rich in black history — especially from black Americans who have flocked there since the 19th century.

Remembrances
4:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

British Journalist Sir David Frost Dies At 74

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. We're saying good-bye, this morning, to the man who conducted one of the most famous television interviews in history.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED INTERVIEW)

DAVID FROST: So what in a sense you're saying, is that there are certain situations where the president can decide that it's in the best interests of the nation or something and do something illegal?

PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON: Well, when the President does it that means it's not illegal.

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