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Around the Nation
5:56 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Believe In Fortune Cookie Predictions? After This, You Might

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

OK. Next time you open a fortune cookie, you might want to give the message careful consideration. Last week, after dinner out with his wife, William Johnson cracked open a fortune cookie. The little piece of paper inside told him: You will soon come into a lot of gold. The Southwick, Massachusetts man went out the next day, he bought a lottery ticket. He scratched it off, and the prize wasn't gold, but he could use it to buy a lot. He won a million dollars.

The Two-Way
5:27 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Steam And Groundwater Raise Concern At Japanese Nuclear Plant

Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) workers work on waste water tanks at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in the town of Okuma, Fukushima prefecture in Japan on June 12, 2013.
Noboru Hashimoto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 10:01 am

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Around the Nation
5:27 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Making Sense Of Cleveland's Good And Bad News

The new Cleveland Convention Center is hosting its first major event, the National Senior Games.
Thomas Ondrey The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:13 pm

As Cleveland embraces national attention for everything from its booming arts and culinary scene to its redevelopment plans, it struggles with recent high-profile crimes. Some residents and tourists are left with news whiplash as they try to figure out what these diverging storylines say about the city.

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U.S.
5:27 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Collecting Taxes Among Detroit's Financial Troubles

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Detroit is broke. But a federal judge is holding hearings to determine whether Detroit is broke enough to qualify for bankruptcy protection. The court is examining whether the city has done everything possible to put more money in its coffers. Quinn Klinefelter of member station WDET reports one thing is certain - Detroit is struggling to bring into its coffers tax revenue.

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Code Switch
3:41 am
Thu July 25, 2013

After Years Of Violence, L.A.'s Watts Sees Crime Subside

Los Angeles police officers take a break during a basketball game with residents of the Nickerson Gardens housing project in July 2011. Violent crime at Nickerson Gardens and two nearby housing projects has fallen by almost half since 2010.
Thomas Watkins AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 10:48 am

On most weeknights, in the middle of his shift, Los Angeles police officer Keith Mott trades his gun and uniform for a T-shirt and shorts, and heads to a park in the Watts neighborhood of South Los Angeles. He's there to coach 7- and 8-year-old boys on the Pop Warner Pee Wee football team, the Watts Bears.

The kids come from three nearby housing projects: Jordan Downs, Nickerson Gardens and Imperial Courts. The park was carefully chosen. It's a neutral site for local gangs. Otherwise, most of the Bears' parents wouldn't allow them to come and play.

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Parallels
3:40 am
Thu July 25, 2013

South Africans Ponder A Nation Without Mandela

A well-wisher uses his phone to take a picture of a banner of photos of Nelson Mandela outside the Mediclinic Heart Hospital in Pretoria, where the former South African president is being treated.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 7:10 pm

From the township of Alexandra in Johannesburg, shack dwellers can look across a ravine to the spires of Sandton City, which houses the most lavish shopping mall in sub-Saharan Africa.

Alex, as this slum of roughly a half a million people is known, was home to Nelson Mandela when he first moved to Johannesburg in 1941.

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Environment
3:38 am
Thu July 25, 2013

La. Flood Board Sues Oil Industry Over Wetlands

Canals created for navigation and oil and gas pipelines cut through the marsh off the coast of Louisiana, seen in 2010.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 11:49 am

Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost roughly as much land as makes up the state of Delaware.

"If you put the state of Delaware between New Orleans and the ocean, we wouldn't need any levees at all," says John Barry, vice president of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East. "There is this large buffer of land that has disappeared, and that buffer makes New Orleans much more vulnerable to hurricanes."

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Deceptive Cadence
2:03 am
Thu July 25, 2013

The High, Heavenly Voice Of David Daniels

Countertenor David Daniels (right) and dancer Reed Luplau in the Santa Fe Opera's world-premiere production of Oscar, based on the life of Oscar Wilde.
Ken Howard Santa Fe Opera

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 9:19 am

"You very quickly forget whether it's a male voice or a female voice. ... Because he's such a terrific musician, and so expressive, the fact that it's a man singing in a woman's range becomes irrelevant, and what we hear is the music."

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Business
10:43 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Boeing Is Flying High With Latest Earnings

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Boeing flying high.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The aircraft maker says its latest quarterly earnings rose a surprising 13 percent this quarter, despite all the troubles with the new 787 Dreamliner. Boeing said today revenues were up due to increased sales of its commercial jets, including Dreamliners and 737s.

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Around the Nation
7:12 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Nine Months After Sandy, New Jersey's Seeing A Baby Boom

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Pittsburgh Promise
7:10 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Is the Pittsburgh Promise Delivering?

A recent policy brief from conservative think tank Allegheny Institute for Public Policy states that the Pittsburgh Promise is falling well short of its goals, and that its mission should be completely re-focused. But this isn’t the first time the Allegheny Institute has taken on the Pittsburgh Promise.

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World
6:17 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Biden Escapes Monkey Business On Trip To India

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Security for Joe Biden's trip to India is tight, but agents couldn't do much about some rowdy troublemakers during a stop at the Gandhi Memorial. About a dozen monkeys took over a tree above a statue where the vice president would be posing. The Wall Street Journal says they swung on branches and threw half-eaten mangoes to the ground. Photographers held their breath as Biden and his wife approached - luckily, no falling mangoes or other monkey business.

NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Manning Trial Heads Into Closing Arguments

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Closing arguments in the Bradley Manning trial are scheduled for tomorrow. The Army private first class admitted to perpetrating the largest leak of classified data in U.S. history. That's when he sent secret government documents to Wikileaks in 2010. The U.S. government has charged Manning with 22 offenses. The most serious is aiding the enemy, and he could face life in prison if he's convicted.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Tucson Revives Mexican-American Studies Program

The Tucson Unified School District (TUSD) is resurrecting its Mexican-American studies program.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Three years after it was banned by the state of Arizona, the Tucson Unified School District (TUSD) is resurrecting its Mexican-American studies program due to a federal court order. The courses are now known as culturally-relevant classes and are set to begin in a couple of weeks, when the school year begins. And they hold the same potential for controversy.

The TUSD board's decision to bring back the ethnic studies program was a whole lot less contentious than its decision to end the Mexican-American studies classes three years ago.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

House To Vote On Defunding NSA Phone Surveillance

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The U.S. House of Representatives is taking up the issue of domestic spying. Lawmakers are expected to vote today on an amendment that would reign in the National Security Agency program that collects the phone records of millions of Americans. This would be the first vote on the matter since the scope of the NSA program was made public in a series of leaks. As NPR's Tamara Keith reports, at issue is an amendment to the defense appropriations bill.

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All Tech Considered
3:23 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Online Marketers Take Note Of Brains Wired For Rewards

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

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Sports
3:06 am
Wed July 24, 2013

'Beep Baseball' A Homerun With Blind Players

Ryan Strickland takes a practice swing. Even though most players are legally blind, batters, basemen and outfielders all wear blindfolds in Beep Baseball so that people who can see shadows, for example, don't have an advantage.
Jessica Robinson for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

The air smells like cut grass and barbecue at Friendship Park in north Spokane, Wash. And Bee Yang is up to bat. The outfielders get ready. Yang is known as a power hitter.

But this is not your usual baseball game. There's a twist: most of the athletes on the field are visually impaired. Players know where the ball is by listening for it. It's called Beep Baseball, named for the beeping sound the balls make.

Yang listens for the pitch.

He swings.

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Music News
3:05 am
Wed July 24, 2013

In Hollywood, The Actor Who Gives The Call To Prayer

"The bottom line is my Muslim friends have no idea what it's like to be an actor, and my actor friends have no idea what is it like to be a Muslim," Ben Youcef says.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 10:05 am

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Sweetness And Light
10:03 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

NCAA Should 'Bolster And Reinforce' African-American Players

Jaimie D. Travis iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

"And this is a long-term project: We need to spend some time in thinking about how do we bolster and reinforce our African-American boys? And this is something that Michelle and I talk a lot about. There are a lot of kids out there who need help who are getting a lot of negative reinforcement." President Obama

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Asia
6:29 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Japanese Commuters Save A Life During Rush Hour

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. At a station in Japan, a bunch of rush-hour commuters kept the train running on time and saved a life. When a woman stepping off the train fell between the stopped car and platform, about 40 commuters went into action. Along with transit workers, the passengers pushed the 32-ton train far enough away that the woman could be pulled up, pretty much unhurt. And the train? It left only eight minutes late. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Pop Culture
5:56 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Seventh Try's The Charm For Hemingway Look-Alike

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

I mean, isn't it every white haired, husky, bearded man's ambition to look like Hemingway? Sure seemed that way at the annual Papa Hemingway Look-Alike Contest. The annual event was just held at Sloppy Joe's, a favorite Hemingway watering hole on Key West. The winner: software developer Stephen Terry. He beat out more than a hundred hopefuls, including the husband of chef Paula Deen. Those who didn't win, take heart, it was Terry's seventh try. Now that's one earnest effort.

NPR Story
5:23 am
Tue July 23, 2013

What's Different About The Latest Push For Middle East Talks

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 8:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Secretary of State John Kerry is trying to bring Israeli and Palestinian officials to Washington to discuss a possible resumption of peace talks. Kerry announced on Friday that the two sides have tentatively agreed to preliminary talks but when and if actual peace negotiations will occur is uncertain. White House spokesman Jay Carney said yesterday he hopes the parties will be in Washington in the coming weeks.

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NPR Story
5:23 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Political Reporters Hit The (Bike) Trail In Iowa

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Okay. Political stories often come from the White House and they often take our political correspondents, say, to Iowa. That's where three of them are right now. But not for an election cycle, but actually to cycle. NPR's Don Gonyea, Scott Horsley and Brian Naylor are all on vacation together, pedaling across the state of Iowa, hundreds of miles with thousands of other cyclists. It's an annual summertime ritual known as RAGBRAI.

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NPR Story
5:23 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Republicans Pin Hopes On Senate Turnover In 2014

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Washington, D.C. the next election always seems just around the corner, even in the middle of summer when it seems a long way away to everyone else. Republicans are in the Senate minority today, but about now they're feeling confident about their prospects to pick up seats and maybe even regain the majority in 2014. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson reports.

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Parallels
3:02 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Despite Many Threats, Afghan TV Satire Mocks The Powerful

Zang-e-Khatar, or Danger Bell, makes fun of government officials and other powerful figures in Afghanistan. Cast members are shown performing a skit during a taping of the show.
Sultan Faizy NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 9:10 pm

Saturday Night Live. The Daily Show. Zang-e-Khatar.

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