Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5am to 10am
Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene

NPR's up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary and coverage of news, politics, arts, sports, and more from around the world and in and around Pittsburgh, hosted locally by 90.5 WESA's Josh Raulerson.

Local Host(s): 
Josh Raulerson
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f157e1c837e16b69e49b|5187f152e1c837e16b69e482

Pages

Parallels
3:25 am
Wed June 5, 2013

With Safaris And Yachts, Spanish King Comes Under Fire

Spain's King Juan Carlos, his daughter Infanta Cristina and her husband, Inaki Urdangarin, are seen together on May 22, 2006. A corruption scandal involving Urdangarin, as well as the royal family's lifestyle is contributing to the public's diminishing respect for the monarchy.
Jasper Juinen AP

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 8:16 pm

With Spain's economy in shreds, the country is doing a lot of finger-pointing about who was at fault and where all the money has gone. The latest suspects: the Spanish royal family.

The reputation of the current Spanish king, Juan Carlos, was seemingly cemented one day 32 years ago when armed civil guard officers stormed the Spanish Parliament, holding lawmakers hostage in an attempted coup.

The king went on live TV, denouncing the officers.

"The crown cannot tolerate any action that interrupts the strength of the democratic process," he said.

Read more
Dollar For Dollar: Adventures In Investing
3:24 am
Wed June 5, 2013

Resisting The Temptation To 'Win' When Investing

Hey mutual fund investors: Think you can beat the market? Charley Ellis, who's worked in investment management for 50 years, doubts it. That's because the fees actively managed funds charge can get expensive.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 8:17 pm

NPR's Uri Berliner is taking $5,000 of his own savings and putting it to work. Though he's no financial whiz or guru, he's exploring different types of investments — alternatives that may fare better than staying in a savings account that's not keeping up with inflation.

Read more
Sweetness And Light
10:03 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Take Golf Out Of The Rough, Into The 21st Century

Write This Down: Keeping your own score does not make you more noble, says Frank Deford.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 9:20 am

When my old pal the Sports Curmudgeon had some mildly churlish things to say about golf a few weeks ago, both he and I were upbraided by loyal linksters. As one snapped at me, "You don't know anything about golf."

Perhaps.

But I know all about golf propaganda.

Read more
Afghanistan
8:11 am
Tue June 4, 2013

U.S. Worries Afghan Forces Will Divide Along Ethnic Lines

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

When the American combat mission in Afghanistan ends next year, one concern for U.S. officials is the possibility that the Afghan security forces will then splinter along ethnic lines, and the warlords of the past will reemerge.

From Kandahar, here's NPR's Tom Bowman.

Read more
Food
7:29 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Why Use Bread When Donuts Make A Good Sandwich

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:18 am

Friday is National Doughnut Day. You might want to try Dunkin' Donuts latest creation: bacon and egg between a glazed doughnut.

Europe
7:20 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Longest Word In German Has Been Retired

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

German spelling bees are about to get easier. The language's longest word has been retired. Its 63 letters long so we'll let YouTube's words German channel say it.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Rindfleischetikettierungsuberwachungsaufgabenubertragungsgesetz.

MONTAGNE: One word, the definition: A law concerning the delegation of duties for the supervision of cattle marking and the labeling of beef. The law is outdated, so officials are saying auf wiedersehen.

Politics
6:11 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Obama To Challenge GOP With 3 Federal Appeals Court Picks

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

President Obama will nominate three new judges this morning to the powerful Federal Appeals Court in Washington D.C. The announcement is expected to come in the White House Rose Garden, and as NPR's Scott Horsley reports, there could be a few thorns.

Read more
Law
5:43 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Law Enforcement Celebrates Supreme Court's DNA Ruling

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The law enforcement community is celebrating a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that allows police to automatically take DNA samples from people they've arrested. The 5-to-4 decision allows police to send those samples to a national crime scene database, to see if they match DNA from unsolved crimes.

NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports.

Read more
Business
5:30 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Once High-Flying Game Company Zynga To Lay Off 520 Workers

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Things are not going do well for the online game maker Zynga. The once high-flying gaming company has been struggling and now plans to lay off almost 20 percent of its staff; that's more than 500 employees.

NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

Read more
Business
5:30 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Apple: Price-Fixing Charges 'Not True'

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 4:29 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Lawyers for Apple will be back in court today, defending the company against government charges that it conspired with publishers to fix eBook prices. All the major publishing houses settled months ago with the Justice Department.

But as NPR's Laura Sydell reports, Apple's lawyer told the court the company won't settle because it did nothing wrong.

Read more
Business
5:30 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Jello Tries Out Edgy Social Media Campaign

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Jell-O is jiggling up the Twitter-verse.

NPR's Travis Larchuk reports the wholesome brand has an edgy new social media campaign.

TRAVIS LARCHUK, BYLINE: Jell-O's classic commercials end on these five letters...

(SOUNDBITE OF JINGLE)

UNIDENTIFIED PEOPLE: (Singing) J-E-L-L-O!

LARCHUK: But on Twitter, the company's pared it down to just three letters, F-M-L.

Read more
Parallels
3:47 am
Tue June 4, 2013

As U.S. Troops Draw Down, Can Afghans Take The Lead?

Villagers in Kasan gather to meet with Afghan local police and the Afghan National Army along with ANASF team members during a morning shura to discuss security.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 11:25 am

There's just a sliver of light in the eastern sky as the patrol leaves the American compound through a thick metal door.

They scamper across Highway 2, a narrow asphalt road that leads to Kabul, just an hour's drive away — if not for the war. They cross an old graveyard and head toward the silhouette of a tree line, all seen through the eerie green glow of night-vision goggles.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:28 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Book Explores Downfall Of An Indian-American Business Icon

Rajat Gupta, former Goldman Sachs director and former senior partner at McKinsey & Co., was sentenced to two years in prison for leaking inside information to hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Rajat Gupta was one of the wealthiest and most successful men in America and an icon of the Indian-American community. Today, he faces two years in prison for insider trading, convicted of passing corporate secrets to his billionaire friend and Galleon Group founder Raj Rajaratnam.

Gupta was already a wealthy man; what was the motive for his crime? In The Billionaire's Apprentice:The Rise of the Indian-American Elite and the Fall of the Galleon Hedge Fund, journalist Anita Raghavan tries to answer that question.

Read more
Parallels
3:27 am
Tue June 4, 2013

High-Tech Sensors Help Old Port City Leap Into Smart Future

The Spanish city of Santander is using a network of sensors to help improve services and save money. Incidents reported to Santander's command-and-control center, where the city manages data from sensors and smartphone reports made by citizens, are plotted on a map of the city.
Courtesy of the University of Cantabria

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 1:53 pm

Aside from the occasional ferry down from England, the old Spanish port city of Santander doesn't get too many foreign visitors. So imagine the locals' surprise when delegations from Google, Microsoft and the Japanese government all landed there recently, to literally walk the streets.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:19 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Obama Administration Seeks To Ease Approvals For Antibiotics

These staph bacteria are resistant to vancomycin, an antibiotic that is one of the last lines of defense.
Janice Haney Carr CDC

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 5:15 pm

Every day in hospitals all over America, thousands of patients die of infections that used to be curable. But the antibiotics used to treat them aren't working anymore.

It's called drug resistance, and it's largely a consequence of antibiotics overuse. The more germs are exposed to antibiotics, the faster they mutate to evade being vanquished.

Read more
Code Switch
12:03 am
Tue June 4, 2013

New Survey Takes A Snapshot Of The View From Black America

African-Americans said they were optimistic about the future despite anxieties about possible financial hardships.
Barry Gregg Corbis

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 5:19 pm

You might think African-Americans might be more pessimistic about their lives. The housing crisis decimated pockets of black wealth. The black unemployment rate has been nearly double the national average for several years.

But according to findings from our survey of more than 1,000 African-Americans, you'd be wrong.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:41 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Why Chase Tornadoes? To Save Lives, Not To 'Die Ourselves'

Friday's storm, which produced a mile-wide tornado, as it neared El Reno, Okla.
Richard Rowe Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

  • Josh Wurman on why scientists get close to tornadoes
  • Josh Wurman on how the community is reacting to three storm chasers' deaths

The deaths Friday of veteran storm chaser Tim Samaras, his son Paul and their friend Carl Young when a tornado near El Reno, Okla., pummeled their vehicle has raised some questions:

-- Why do storm chasers do what they do?

-- Do the benefits outweigh the dangers?

Read more
Strange News
10:23 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Scottish Couple Welcomes Third Set Of Twins

Karen and Colin Rodger already had two sets of boys. When Mom got pregnant this time, the thought of more twins crossed her mind, but a doctor said the odds were 500,000 to 1. Now she's given birth to twin girls, and the family tells the Daily Mirror it's shopping for a van.

Around the Nation
7:49 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Wisconsin Hopes Cream Puff Controversy Won't Curdle Fair

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 6:51 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:37 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Yankees Pay Tribute To 'Lifelong' Fan

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 10:23 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Yankees fan Bernando LaPallo was born the same year as his team. And Saturday, more than a century after attending his first game, LaPallo was at the New Yankee Stadium for what he called: the greatest day of my life. He shook hands with shortstop Derek Jeter. But 93 years earlier, LaPallo shook hands with Babe Ruth who called him my youngest admirer. LaPallo is now 111 years old.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Middle East
6:12 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Fight For Homs Fades From Headlines As War In Syria Rages

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 10:23 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. We're going to get a glimpse from the front lines of the civil war in Syria now. That war is expected to be the focus of peace negotiations, in the coming weeks. The U.S. is pressing for those talks after brutal fighting, fighting that's begun to spread to neighboring countries.

Read more
Author Interviews
6:07 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Sushi Chef Was Confidant To North Korea's Kim Jong Il

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 1:36 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

When the North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il died two years ago, his son Kim Jong Un rose to power. The world knew practically nothing about the young and untested leader. In fact, nobody knew exactly how young he was until his birth date was revealed by a man who goes by the pseudonym Kenji Fujimoto, Kim Jong Il's former sushi chef and longtime confidante.

Read more
Business
5:54 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Trial To Start In Apple Price-Fixing Dispute

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 10:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And Apple faces off with the Justice Department beginning today in a federal court over a price-fixing dispute. Last year, the government accused Apple of conspiring with five major publishing companies to raise prices on electronic books.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

Read more
Code Switch
3:36 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Barrier-Breaking Surfer's Legacy A Reminder Of Work To Do

Surfers surround a celebrant who pours libations and says prayers to honor the spirit of surfers past and present and to give thanks to the sea for providing sustenance and recreation.
Karen Grigsby Bates NPR

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 3:31 pm

The Saturday morning fog was burning off above the part of Santa Monica's beach known as the Inkwell. It's the stretch of sand to which black Southern Californians were relegated by de facto segregation until the 1960s.

Men, women and children walked across the sand in wet suits, carrying surfboards. They're part of the Black Surfers Collective, which aims to get more people of color involved in surfing.

They had gathered to honor pioneer Nick Gabaldon, a legendary surfer who is remembered as the area's first documented board man of African-American and Mexican heritage.

Read more
Law
3:35 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Intent To Harm At Center Of Bradley Manning's Trial

Protesters march during a rally in support of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning outside Fort Meade, Md., on Saturday. Manning, who is scheduled to face a court-martial beginning Monday, is accused of sending hundreds of thousands of classified records to WikiLeaks while working as an intelligence analyst in Baghdad.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 10:23 am

In the three years since his arrest, Bradley Manning, the slight Army private first class with close-cropped blond hair and thick military glasses, has become less of a character than a cause.

"Bradley Manning is a very polarizing figure. People either think that he is a hero or they think he's a traitor," says Elizabeth Goitein, who co-directs the liberty and national security program at the Brennan Center for Justice. "I actually think that he's somewhere in between."

Read more

Pages