Weekend Edition

Saturdays and Sundays from 8am to 10am
Scott Simon and Rachel Martin

News, analysis, essays, and features for your weekend, anchored by Scott Simon on Saturdays, NPR's Peabody Award-winning host and correspondent. Sundays are hosted by NPR's Rachel Martin and feature The New York Times crossword editor Will Shortz offering a challenging puzzle each week. Hosted locally by Liz Reid.

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Music Interviews
5:08 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Tim McGraw: 'I'm Just Now Learning How To Be Good'

Tim McGraw's new album is called Two Lanes to Freedom.
Nigel Parry Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 2:16 pm

Tim McGraw has been a star long enough that he can look back on his early music and laugh a little bit. That goes for his hairstyles as well; ask him about the music video for "Indian Outlaw," and he'll tell you about what he calls "the mullet days." But that hit from his second album, along with the track "Don't Take the Girl," put his music career on a whole different trajectory.

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Around the Nation
5:07 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Lessons From Cicadas: A New Jersey Community's Experience

A member of Brood II alights on a New Jersey shrub.
Fred Mogul NPR

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 12:58 pm

Ten-year-old Markus Gokan has mixed feelings about the cicadas scattered around the yards and sidewalks of Summit, N.J.

"There's tons of them just squashed, just these flat, pancake cicadas that don't look very appetizing," Gokan says.

Yet he's not afraid to touch and handle un-squashed cicadas — to serve a higher purpose.

"I did pick up a few, and I threw them at some people I don't like," he explains.

They screamed, he says, so for him his mission was successful.

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Parallels
5:05 am
Sun June 9, 2013

'Arab Idol' Finalist Delivers Sweet Music, Palestinian Pride

Palestinian performer Mohammad Assaf is a finalist on Arab Idol, which is filmed in the Lebanese city of Jounieh north of the capital Beirut.
Anwar Amro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 8:18 am

In Palestinian territory, Mohammad Assaf's face is easy to find. Big posters of the dark-haired 23-year-old dreamboat smile at you along boulevards in Ramallah. And in Gaza, a giant banner of Assaf billows outside his family home.

Assaf's dad, Jabar Assaf, is bursting with pride.

"I'm very, very, very proud of my son. Besides singing so well, he is very polite, and he is studying at the university," Jabar Assaf says. "He's no street kid. I'm very proud."

So are many other Palestinians — including 16-year-old Abeer Ali.

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Around the Nation
5:05 am
Sun June 9, 2013

A Year Later, Few Residents Have Rebuilt After Colorado Fire

The High Park wildfire swept through the rural area northwest of Fort Colins, Colo., last June, leaving one person dead.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 12:58 pm

Sunday marks the one-year anniversary of the High Park fire northwest of Fort Collins, Colo. The blaze consumed 259 homes in the rural area, but so far only 10 households have finished rebuilding a year later.

As Gary and Martha Lemert sort through photographs from the High Park fire, it takes just one before and after shot to convey the complete devastation of their 10-acre property.

All they had left after the fire was a green roof that looked like it had been melted on top of gray rubble. All told, the Lemerts lost eight buildings, including a garage and a guest house.

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History
8:03 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Reviving Eudora Welty's Account Of Medgar Evers

Eudora Welty's 1963 short story about the assassination of civil rights leader Medgar Evers will be published in its original form this weekend in the Mississippi newspaper The Clarion Ledger. Reporter Jerry Mitchell talks to Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin about its significance.

Author Interviews
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Author Recounts Growing Up In 'Fairyland'

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Childhood is a complicated journey for most of us: trying to fit in, trying to stand out; wanting to distance yourself from your parents one minute, wanting to grab onto them the next. Now on top of all that, imagine being raised by a single, gay father in the epicenter of the AIDS epidemic in the San Francisco of the 1980s. That was the frame of Alysia Abbott's childhood. She writes about it in her book. It is called "Fairyland: A Memoir of my Father."

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Around the Nation
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Washington Monument Receives Much-Needed Repair

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 2:36 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The National Mall might be known as America's front yard, but it's always something of a work in progress: buildings undergo facelifts, grass is patched and restored and millions of people continue to troop through, snapping photos. And now one of the biggest attractions is being covered up for repairs. NPR's Christopher Connelly has this report.

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Arts & Life
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Summer Travel Tips Of The Frugal Kind

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin gets some money-saving travel tips from Seth Kugel, who writes the Frugal Traveler column in The New York Times.

Sports
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Sports Chat: NBA, NHL Zero In On Finals Matches

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks to NPR's Mike Pesca about the week in sports.

Author Interviews
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Searching High And Low For The 'American Spirit'

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:03 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Latin America
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Rare Gang Truce Disrupts Violence In Honduras

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 3:41 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When you think of the most dangerous places in the world, Syria or Afghanistan might come to mind. But Honduras has the highest murder rate in the world. Nearly 40 percent of the cocaine consumed globally passes through its borders. And the Central American country is home to thousands of gang members, many of whom got their start on U.S. city streets. Last week though, there was a hopeful development suggesting even the most hardened criminals may have had enough.

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Latin America
6:52 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Defense Department To Produce Radio Novella In Columbia

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 2:45 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF A SONG)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Singing in foreign language)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Drug, guns, steamy romance. It is not called "El Cartel" for nothing.

(SOUNDBITE OF TELENOVELA, "EL CARTEL")

MARTIN: "El Cartel" was one of Colombia's top rated narco telenovelas, to TV soap operas that romanticized the country's drug cartels.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNSHOTS)

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The Sunday Conversation
6:06 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Mount Everest Climber Warns Of An Overpopulated Mountain

At 25,000 feet, this 1963 photo shows the push towards the summit of Everest.
Barry Bishop Courtesy National Geographic

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 1:56 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Perhaps no active climber is more closely associated with Mount Everest these days than Conrad Anker. He has reached the highest point on Earth three times, and he discovered the body of George Mallory — the British climber who may or may not have reached Everest's summit before disappearing in 1924.

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Parallels
5:49 am
Sun June 2, 2013

U.S. Tourists Become Israeli Commandos For A Day

Businessmen from Philadelphia practice with wooden cutouts of rifles at Caliber 3, a counter-terrorism training center amid Israeli settlements south of Jerusalem. Millions of tourists visit Israel each year and for those interested in Israel's security, for a price they can spend a few hours learning commando techniques.
Emiliy Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 8:29 am

After two hours of yelling, shooting and getting tough with a group of American businessmen one hot spring afternoon, Steve Gar turned to storytelling.

Gar is an instructor at Caliber3, a private counterterrorism training center in an Israeli settlement area south of Jerusalem that offers short shooting courses for tourists. Wrapping up the Americans' two-hour session, he called them all to gather around.

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Parallels
5:24 am
Sun June 2, 2013

A City Of Assad Supporters In War-Ravaged Syria

The port city of Tartous is in a region loyal to President Bashar Assad. The city has been a refuge for supporters to vacation and seek work.
Steve Inskeep NPR

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 2:33 pm

Many people in Syria are accustomed to the sound of daily gunfire. It is normal in battle-scarred cities like Damascus or Qusair.

But along the beaches and in the cafes of Tartous, an area that is a center of support for the embattled President Bashar Assad, the sounds are a bit more peaceful.

Near the water's edge of the Mediterranean, tables, chairs and umbrellas sit upon huge stones. At one of these tables sits a brother and sister on vacation.

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Music Interviews
5:22 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Quadron: For Love Of The Slow Jam

Quadron is the duo of Robin Hannibal and Coco O. Their new album is called Avalanche.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:33 am

It started with two young Danes growing up in Copenhagen, with a somewhat unorthodox love for 1970s soul music.

"It's not part of the culture and the history," Coco O., the singing half of the duo Quadron, explains. "Soul music was kind of a cute thing, but not serious. Rock music was serious."

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It's All Politics
5:21 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Ted Cruz: 'The New Voice' Of The GOP?

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, accompanied by Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., speaks during a news conference with Tea Party leaders on May 16. Bachmann, chairwoman of the Tea Party Caucus, announced this week she won't seek re-election. Meanwhile, Cruz's fortunes continue to soar.
Molly Riley AP

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 10:56 am

On the same day this week that House Tea Party Caucus co-founder Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., announced she won't seek re-election, the fortunes of another Tea Party favorite continued to soar.

Freshman GOP Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas headlined a big fundraiser thrown by the New York Republican Party in the heart of Manhattan. More than 600 Republicans gathered to write checks to their struggling party, which has no statewide officeholders.

But it was not exactly a welcoming committee that awaited Cruz outside the Grand Hyatt hotel.

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Sunday Puzzle
5:06 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Keep Your I On The Prize

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 6:52 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a made-up two-word phrase in which the letter I is inserted somewhere inside the first word to get the second word.

Last week's challenge: Think of a word starting with G. Change the G to a T and rearrange the letters after the T. The result will be a new word with the same meaning as the original word.

Answer: Giant; titan

Winner: Bonnie Kind of Germantown, Md.

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Books
10:35 am
Sun May 26, 2013

The Women Who Inspired Other Women With 'Mary Tyler Moore'

The Mary Tyler Moore Show first aired in 1970.
AP

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 11:26 am

In the '60s, many of the women on television were cute, a little silly and married. A couple shows even featured women who were sweetly supernatural — think Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie. Mary Richards, though, was single, sassy and filled with joy. She was practically magic to a new generation of women.

The beloved Mary Tyler Moore Show went on the air in 1970, and now, more than four decades years later, it's still a source of inspiration.

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Author Interviews
10:09 am
Sun May 26, 2013

The Women Who Inspired Other Women With 'Mary Tyler Moore'

The Mary Tyler Moore Show first aired in 1970.
AP

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 10:22 am

In the sixties, many of the women on television were cute, a little silly, and married. Mary Richards, though, was single, sassy, and filled with joy. A new book about the Mary Tyler Moore Show focuses on the women behind the scenes of the show that's still inspiring women today.

The Sunday Conversation
8:03 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Day By Day: A Mother's Life With Cancer

In 2000, at age 28, Neeley Wells was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. She's been living with the disease since then, never in remission, alongside her husband and 14-year-old daughter.
Courtesy Neeley Wells

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 6:46 pm

When Neeley Wells was diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer, her daughter Dylan was only 10 months old. The doctor told Wells she had two weeks to live. That was 13 years ago.

"In some ways, for me, it's a little like Groundhogs Day. I'll think, maybe this is my last spring break. And then I'll think, yeah, but I've already thought that 13 times. For me, as a person, there's not a lot of value to trying to figure out what the endgame or the end-time is."

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National Security
7:13 am
Sun May 26, 2013

What's Changed Since U.S. Last Moved Detainees To Yemen

Host Rachel Martin talks with Greg Johnsen, author of The Last Refuge: Yemen, al-Qaeda, and America's War in Arabia. They discuss President Obama's plan to restart prisoner transfers of Yemeni detainees from the Guantanamo Bay prison.

Politics
7:13 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Obama Administration Turns Attention Toward Africa

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry was in the capital of Ethiopia this weekend. He was attending the 50th anniversary summit of the African Union, and he was laying the groundwork for President Obama's trip to Africa in the next month. Our East Africa correspondent Gregory Warner is in Addis Ababa. He joins us now. Hi, Greg. Thanks for being with us.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Thanks, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, you spent the day with the secretary. How was he received?

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National Security
7:13 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Ex-Obama Adviser On Plan To Limit Drones: Why Did We Wait?

President Obama gave a major speech Thursday intended to narrow the scope of the U.S. fight against terrorism. He addressed the administration's much-criticized drone program. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Adm. Dennis Blair, who was Obama's top intelligence adviser from 2009 to 2010, and a vocal critic of the administration's drone campaign.

NPR Story
6:30 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Dolphin Helps Navy Recover Rare Torpedo Under The Sea

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 7:13 am

A dolphin being trained by the Navy to find underwater mines recently made a surprising discovery: a 130-year-old brass torpedo, lying dormant at the bottom of the ocean. Host Rachel Martin talks with Chris Harris, chief of operations for the Navy's Marine Mammal Program, about the find.

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