Weekend Edition

Saturdays and Sundays from 8am to 10am
Scott Simon and Rachel Martin

News, analysis, essays, and features for your weekend, anchored by Scott Simon on Saturdays, NPR's Peabody Award-winning host and correspondent. Sundays are hosted by NPR's Rachel Martin and feature The New York Times crossword editor Will Shortz offering a challenging puzzle each week. Hosted locally by Liz Reid.

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Author Interviews
9:41 am
Sun May 4, 2014

A Quest For Higher Power In 'The Snow Queen'

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 1:06 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The writer Michael Cunningham is probably best known for his book "The Hours," which won him a Pulitzer Prize and was made into a film. Like "The Hours," Cunningham's new novel, "The Snow Queen," explores inner lives and family dynamics. But the characters in this new book also plunge into the metaphysical world. When I spoke with Michael Cunningham this past week, I asked him to read from a section of his new novel. It's a scene where one of the main characters, a man named Barrett, sees an ethereal light in the skies above N.Y.

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Music Reviews
7:38 am
Sun May 4, 2014

Alt Latino Spring Cleaning: Cover Songs From The Mailbox

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 12:32 pm

NPR's Rachel Martin chats with Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd of NPR Music's AltLatino. This week they tackle cover songs.

Sports
7:38 am
Sun May 4, 2014

Football Team Helps Make One High School Out Of Two

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 1:06 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

At Martin Luther King High School in Philadelphia, football is more than a sport. It's an escape.

(SOUNDBITE OF DOCUMENTARY, "WE COULD BE KING")

UNIDENTIFIED STUDENT #1: I plan to move out of Philly 'cause it's not getting any better.

UNIDENTIFIED STUDENT #2: Hearing gunshots on a daily basis was nothing new. If you live in Philadelphia, I'm sure you agree, life is rough. Times are hard and sometimes you want to give up. I do, too.

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Politics
7:38 am
Sun May 4, 2014

The Story Of The Parties' Crucial Appeals To Women In 'She Votes'

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 1:06 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. We are six months away from this year's midterm elections, and Democrats and Republicans are ramping up campaign messaging. Both parties agree women could hold the key to victory in November. And many of the most endangered incumbents and high-profile challengers are also women.

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Shots - Health News
12:00 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Giving Up On Its Obamacare Exchange No Cure For Oregon's Ills

Oregon was an early adopter of the Affordable Care Act, and ran a series of ads encouraging all Oregonians to sign up for health insurance. But their website never became fully functional.
Cover Oregon

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Oregon has been "all in" on health reform. Its embrace of the Affordable Care Act includes a very successful Medicaid expansion, a $2 billion federal experiment to show the state can save money by managing patients' care better, and, of course, the state's own online marketplace to sell Obamacare insurance.

But that last point has been a huge problem.

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Science
10:45 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Fossil Fans Get Their Dino-Fix Before Smithsonian Renovates

A cast of a Tyrannosaurus rex skull greets visitors as they enter the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Huge lines of people, kids in tow, are waiting to get into the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, the world's second-most visited museum.

Right inside the lobby, a cast of the skull of the new Tyrannosaurus rex the museum just acquired is stopping visitors dead in their tracks.

"We wanted to get up here before the exhibit for the dinosaurs closed," says Crystal Epley, who took a three-hour trip from Broadway, Va., to bring her son, John.

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Interviews
10:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

The Risk And Reward Of Monitoring Elections In The Middle East

Election officials count ballots under the scrutiny of monitors in Iraq in 2005. Les Campbell from the National Democratic Institute worked as an election monitor during Iraq's 2005 elections, a job that came with a flak jacket and security detail.
Sasa Kralj AP

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Iraq is suffering the worst spate of violence in many years — some say the worst since the height of the U.S. war in 2008. On Friday, dozens of people were killed at an election rally in Baghdad. This Wednesday, Iraqis will go to the polls in the first parliamentary election since the U.S. pulled combat troops out in 2011.

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Movies
9:28 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Artist Ralph Steadman: A Nice Man, For A Pictorial Assassin

Steadman's drawing of Hunter S. Thompson's car beset by huge bats illustrated Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas in 1971.
Courtesy of Ralph Steadman/Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Ralph Steadman is known to most Americans for the surreal illustrations he drew to accompany Hunter S. Thompson's articles and books, including Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

But Steadman has drawn everything from extinct birds to savage political caricatures to wine and beer labels. He's even written an opera libretto.

The British artist is also the subject of a documentary, titled For No Good Reason, narrated by Johnny Depp.

Such A Nice Man, Such Dangerous Drawings

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Music Interviews
8:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Brian Blade Finds A 'Landmark' In His Shreveport Roots

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Drummer Brian Blade's rhythm has propelled the music of everyone from Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell to Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock. But he's also a composer with his own group. "Landmarks" is the new album from Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band.

(SOUNDBITE OF ALBUM, "LANDMARKS")

MARTIN: Blade records in his brother Brady's studio in Shreveport, Louisiana. And he joins us from there today. Welcome to the program, Brian.

BRIAN BLADE: Thank you, Rachel.

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Afghanistan
8:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Ancient Form Of Poetry Captures Afghan Women's Lives

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Eliza Griswold has reported from Afghanistan for more than a decade, writing news features for the New York Times magazine and other publications. She thought she had a pretty good grip on the country's politics and culture, but it wasn't until she started exploring Afghan women's poetry that she discovered a different side of women's lives there. What she found was a complex world of rage, empowerment, sorrow and sex.

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Arts & Life
8:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Like So Many Magazines, 'Ladies' Home Journal' Cuts Back

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Ladies' Home Journal, the magazine that was once so popular with housewives and homemakers, is ending its 130-year run as a monthly magazine. The print magazine business has of course changed dramatically in the last few decades.

And Ladies' Home Journal saw its own advertising revenues drop by more than 50 percent over the last 10 years. But this story isn't just about business as you might expect. NPR's Zoe Chace explains women have changed too.

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The Sunday Conversation
11:53 am
Sun April 20, 2014

A Witness To The Bombing, A Nurse Returns To Boston As A Runner

Amelia Nelson (right) and her friend Kristy were volunteers at the 2013 Boston Marathon when the bombings happened.
Courtesy of Amelia Nelson

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

As a volunteer for the 2013 Boston Marathon, nurse Amelia Nelson thought should would be there to help runners as they came across the finish line.

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Religion
11:28 am
Sun April 20, 2014

This May Be Rogue Parishioners' Last Easter In Closed Church

Since 2004, members of the Saint Frances Cabrini Catholic Church have continuously occupied the building to keep it from shutting down.
Maryellen Rogers

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Nearly a decade has passed since the doors of the Saint Frances Cabrini Catholic Church were shut and its holy water dried up.

With the Archdiocese of Boston strapped for cash, it was one of dozens of churches in the area to be closed and sold off. At the time, the archdiocese was in the throes of the clergy sex abuse crisis. It had agreed to pay nearly $85 million to more than 500 people who said they were abused by priests.

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Theater
10:49 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Daniel Radcliffe's 'Crippled' Role Reaches Out To The Remote

Daniel Radcliffe (right) plays Billy, in a scene with Pat Shortt as Johnnypateenmike, in the Broadway production of Martin McDonagh's The Cripple of Inishmaan.
Johan Persson Michael Grandage Company

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Even before he finished his eight-film run as Harry Potter, actor Daniel Radcliffe spent a considerable time devoted to the stage, both in London and New York. He appeared on Broadway in Equus and spent a year playing J. Pierrepont Finch, the lead role in the musical How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.

On Sunday night, the 24-year-old actor opens at Broadway's Cort Theatre in a production of Martin McDonagh's dark Irish comedy, The Cripple of Inishmaan.

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Movie Reviews
10:01 am
Sun April 20, 2014

'Fading Gigolo' Full Of Loneliness And Longing

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 1:34 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Actor John Turturro is known for his work in films like "Quiz Show" and "The Big Lebowski." With his long face and hang-dog look, he's probably not what you'd call a matinee idol. But he went ahead and cast himself as the title character in his new movie, "Fading Gigolo." And he cast Woody Allen as his pimp. Critic Bob Mondello says it's easy to imagine ways this concept might go terribly wrong, but it doesn't.

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Sunday Puzzle
10:01 am
Sun April 20, 2014

April Showers Bring Puzzle Flowers

NPR

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

On-air challenge: With spring in the air, it's a fitting time for a flower puzzle. Find the flower answer using its anagram, minus one letter. Example: R-I-S-H-I, minus H, is "iris."

Last week's challenge from listener Louis Sargent of Portland, Ore: Name a well-known American company. Insert a W somewhere inside the name, and you'll get two consecutive titles of popular TV shows of the past. What are they?

Answer: Westinghouse; West Wing, House

Winner: John Rowden of New York

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Author Interviews
8:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Exploring The Secret History Of The Cubicle

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 11:34 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now to a topic you may be intimately familiar with, the office - the paperwork, the cubicles, the potentially awkward social dynamic. It is an almost universal experience that's been baked into our pop-culture, like in the movie "Office Space."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "OFFICE SPACE")

GARY COLE: (As Bill Lumbergh) Hello, Peter. What's happening? Uh, we have sort of a problem here. Yeah, you apparently didn't put one of the new cover sheets on your TPS reports.

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Asia
8:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Japan's Competitive Poets Know How To Turn A Phrase

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

April is National Poetry Month here in the United States. But in Japan, poetry is also big this time of year when a popular poetry contest sweeps the country. It offers modest prizes and absolutely no fame whatsoever. Entries are by pen name only, but the event is as closely watched as a celebrity sighting or a speech by the prime minister. Competitors use a style of verse that is virtually unknown outside Japan. Lucy Craft looked for rhyme and reason behind the country's love affair with this special style of poetry.

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Sports
8:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

How NBA Players Get Rest In An 82-Game Season

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Book News & Features
8:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

'Traveling Pants' Author Tries Traveling In Time

Author Ann Brashares became a young adult superstar more than a decade ago with the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, a feel-good series of books about the adventures of four best friends and a really great pair of jeans. It was eventually made into a couple of movies.

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Europe
8:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Tiny Liechtenstein Loses A Precious Quarter-Acre

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 9:37 am

The tiny principality of Liechtenstein spreads across a grand total of 62 square miles. Now, it's getting smaller.

Education
11:32 am
Sun April 13, 2014

Boston Finds That Quality Preschool Is Worth The Effort

Using a projector, Jodi Doyle points out shadows on the ceiling to students in her preschool class at the Eliot School in Boston. Boston has become a beacon for the universal preschool movement, but so far it can only provide seats for about half the interested families.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Sun April 13, 2014 12:32 pm

It's a Wednesday morning at the Eliot K-8 Innovation School. Teacher Jodi Doyle is working with a small group of preschool students interested in domes.

"What do you think the difference is between a dome and an arch?" she asks.

The lesson doesn't go exactly as planned. Doyle wants the kids to build their domes with wire, but she wants the children to come up with that idea themselves. The kids used wire several months ago for a related project, and she hopes they'll remember.

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The Sunday Conversation
11:29 am
Sun April 13, 2014

Caring For Wounded Vet A Burden Family Gladly Shares

Craig Remsburg (left) remembers fondly the day his son, Army Ranger Sgt. 1st Class Cory Remsburg (center) received a standing ovation at the State of the Union speech in January. Cory was injured while serving in Afghanistan.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 13, 2014 6:54 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Craig Remsburg's son, Army Ranger Cory Remsburg, was serving in Afghanistan when he was wounded by a roadside bomb in 2009. Earlier this year, the father and son attended the State of the Union address as guests of President Obama and the first lady.

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Music Interviews
7:35 am
Sun April 13, 2014

Throw-Back Harmonies Blend The Secret Sisters

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 9:34 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Laura and Lydia Rogers are from Muscle Shoals, Ala., and they go by the name The Secret Sisters. After their first album was released in 2010, the beauty and precision of their harmonies attracted comparisons with The Everly Brothers and The Andrews Sisters.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TENNESSEE ME")

THE SECRET SISTERS: (Singing) Oh, oh, Tennessee me. Tennessee me loving you. See me by the fireside light. Come and see me through the night...

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Author Interviews
7:35 am
Sun April 13, 2014

Book Tells Of Life As A Perennial Co-Star, Almost Famous

Originally published on Sun April 13, 2014 6:54 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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