Weekend Edition

Saturdays and Sundays from 8am to 10am
Scott Simon and Rachel Martin

News, analysis, essays, and features for your weekend, anchored by Scott Simon on Saturdays, NPR's Peabody Award-winning host and correspondent. Sundays are hosted by NPR's Rachel Martin and feature The New York Times crossword editor Will Shortz offering a challenging puzzle each week. Hosted locally by Liz Reid.

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Author Interviews
7:58 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Rick Warren Writes A Faith-Based Diet Book

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

While baptizing 827 adults one day, evangelical pastor Rick Warren says he literally felt the weight of America's obesity problem. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Warren and psychiatrist and physician Daniel Amen about getting healthy and their new book, The Daniel Plan: 40 Days to a Healthier Life.

Movie Interviews
5:34 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Woody Harrelson Does Bad Pretty Good

Tapping into his anger and rage, Woody Harrelson plays the meth-smoking psychopath antagonizing Christian Bale in Out of the Furnace.
Kerry Hayes Relativity Media

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

In the new drama Out of the Furnace, a young man (Casey Affleck) gets involved with a group of criminals and then goes missing. Determined to find him, his ex-con brother (Christian Bale) grabs a shotgun and sets off.

Actor Woody Harrelson, perhaps best known for his role as the bartender on Cheers, steps away from comedy to play a member of that group of criminals, a viscous meth addict and bookie named Harlan DeGroat.

Harrelson spoke with NPR's Rachel Martin about the movie and preparing for a role that required letting loose a lot of anger.

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NPR Story
1:10 pm
Sun December 1, 2013

Commuter Train Derails In The Bronx

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

An early morning commuter train derailed in New York City on Sunday, killing at least four people and injuring 63. Five cars went off the track as the train took a large curve in the Bronx burough of the city. Host Rachel Martin gets the latest from NPR's Jim Zarroli.

NPR Story
11:53 am
Sun December 1, 2013

N.Y. Train Derailment Kills 4

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

An early morning commuter train derailed in New York City on Sunday, killing at least four people and injuring 63. Five cars went off the track as the train took a large curve in the Bronx burough of the city. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Joe Stepansky of the New York Daily News, who's at the scene.

Movie Interviews
8:24 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Refashioning A Gospel Story In 'Black Nativity'

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In 1961, at the height of the civil rights movement, Langston Hughes wrote the musical play "Black Nativity." It featured an entirely black cast, and it was the first play to incorporate a real gospel choir.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

CHOIR: (Singing) I'm coming home for you, you think (unintelligible).

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Middle East
8:13 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Palestinian Refugees On Losing Side Of UN Budget Crunch

Palestinian refugee Lawahez Burghal stuffs tripe with rice and garbanzo beans for her family in their home in the Amari refugee camp in the West Bank. Many refugees still depend on the United Nations for food, health care and education.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 8:17 am

The United Nations agency that provides basic health care and education to Palestinian refugees doesn't have enough money to pay local salaries this month.

The shortfall could directly affect 30,000 teachers, doctors and social workers, as well as the people using their services in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and the Palestinian territories.

Filling Basic Needs

Sit for an hour in the United Nations Relief and Works Agency office in the al-Amari camp for Palestinian refugees, and you get a sense of what people expect the agency to provide.

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Sunday Puzzle
8:13 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Be THANKful For This Puzzle

NPR

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 3:49 pm

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is a game of categories based on the word "thank," in honor of Thanksgiving weekend. For each category, name something beginning with each of the letters T, H, A, N and K. For example, if the category were "U.S. States," you might say Tennessee, Hawaii, Alaska, Nevada and Kentucky.

Last week's challenge: Name a tree whose letters can be rearranged to spell two herbs or spices. Hint: The tree has a two-word name. What tree is it, and what are the herbs or spices?

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The Sunday Conversation
8:13 am
Sun December 1, 2013

In Gujarat, Anti-Muslim Legacy Of 2002 Riots Still Looms

Zahir Janmohamed on his terrace in Juhapura, in the Muslim ghetto of Ahmedabad.
Miranda Kennedy NPR

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

The U.S. Congress doesn't usually weigh in on domestic politics in other countries, but a resolution recently introduced in Congress by Rep. Keith Ellison is designed to put pressure on Narendra Modi, the front-runner to be India's next prime minister.

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Parallels
5:24 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Five Things You May Not Know About Child Marriage

Arinafe Makwiti, 13, says her parents forced her to drop out of school and get married to an older man last year to help with the family finances. Makwiti has divorced her husband, but now has a 9-month-old daughter.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Originally published on Wed December 4, 2013 10:40 am

NPR's Jennifer Ludden recently traveled to the African nation of Malawi, one of many countries in the developing world where child marriage remains prevalent. She found girls like Christina Asima, who was married at 12 and became a mother at 13. She is now divorced and caring for her infant son on her own. You can read Jennifer's full report here. Below are a few more things she learned while reporting on child marriage.

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Animals
5:21 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Saving The Native Prairie — One Black-Footed Ferret At A Time

Biologist Travis Livieri checks a briefly sedated ferret's health status inside an improvised trailer clinic.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

American pioneers saw the endless stretches of grassland of the Great Plains as a place to produce grain and beef for a growing country. But one casualty was the native prairie ecosystem and animals that thrived only there.

Some biologists are trying to save the prairies and they've picked a hero to help them: the black-footed ferret. In trying to save this long skinny predator with a raccoon-like mask, the biologists believe they have a chance to right a wrong that nearly wiped a species off the planet.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:20 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Da Vinci's String Organ Must Be Heard To Be Believed

Pianist Slawomir Zubrzycki presents the "viola organista" on Oct. 18 in Krakow, Poland. Zubrzycki spent almost four years building the instrument, which is based on a late 15th-century design by Leonardo da Vinci.
Tomasz Wiech AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 11:41 am

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Parallels
2:40 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Restoring The Mausoleum That Helped Inspire The Taj Mahal

Elaborate scaffolding was erected to complete the work on the exterior of Humayun's Tomb.
Courtesy of the AKTC

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

Think Taj Mahal and then try to imagine what came before it. What was the inspiration for that masterpiece?

Archaeologists and architects say a 16th century tomb tucked in the southeast corner of Delhi presaged the jewel of Muslim art in India.

The recent restoration of the mausoleum built to memorialize the Muslim emperor Humayun has created a sensation in the city, drawing sightseers, schoolchildren and history buffs to the site that is now a showcase for India's architectural patrimony.

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Latin America
8:23 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Amid Crime And Poverty, Hondurans Go To The Polls

Honduran presidential candidate Xiomara Castro greets supporters during a campaign rally in Tegucigalpa last week.
Eduardo Verdugo AP

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 1:50 pm

Voters go to the polls in Honduras to elect a new president on Sunday. It's the first open election with all parties participating since a coup overthrew the left-leaning government in 2009.

The elections come at a difficult time for the longtime U.S. ally. Two-thirds of its people live in poverty, unemployment is soaring and the murder rate is one of the highest in the world due to drug traffickers and gang violence.

The Gang Tax

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NPR Story
8:23 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Iranians Hope For Normalcy After Nuclear Agreement

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 1:50 pm

Iranians are used to bad news, so word of an international deal to halt the nation's nuclear program and the lifting of some sanctions was something extraordinary. Host Rachel Martin speaks with New York Times Tehran Bureau Chief Thomas Erdbrink.

NPR Story
8:23 am
Sun November 24, 2013

GOP Skeptical Of Iran Deal

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 1:50 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

In a diplomatic breakthrough, Iran has agreed to temporary limits on its nuclear program. In exchange, the U.S. and its allies have agreed to relax some of their crippling economic sanctions on Iran. The six-month agreement is designed to buy time to negotiate a more lasting deal that would prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons. It's already drawn a skeptical response in Israel and from some lawmakers here at home.

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Author Interviews
5:48 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Thanksgiving Dinner Deja Vu? Try French Food This Year

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 1:50 pm

As you're thinking about this year's Thanksgiving menu, you might be feeling a bit bored. Green bean casserole? Been there. Turkey and stuffing? Meh. Pumpkin pie? Cliché.

We were looking for a little Thanksgiving inspiration, so we reached out to culinary legend Patricia Wells. The veteran restaurant critic and cookbook author has been teaching French cooking for nearly two decades in Paris and Provence.

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The Sunday Conversation
5:45 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Caring For A Schizophrenic Son, Worrying About The Future

Gary Mihelish and his wife now teach classes for families that are coping with mental illness.
Courtesy of Gary Mihelish

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 6:25 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

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Shots - Health News
5:43 am
Sun November 24, 2013

Colorado Ads Use Sex And Alcohol To Sell Health Insurance

This controversial ad riffing off the legendary "got milk?" campaign is one of several marketing health insurance to young people in Colorado.
Thanks Obamacare campaign

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 1:41 pm

Try this on for size: The Affordable Care Act is good for young adults because it'll save them money on health care, leaving them more to spend on liquor and birth control.

That's one way to interpret the message from a provocative new ad campaign in Colorado. Not everyone is thrilled with it.

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Sunday Puzzle
8:46 am
Sun November 17, 2013

More Fun Than A Dead Rose

NPR

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 11:24 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a made-up, two-word phrase in which the vowel in the first word is a short "e" and the vowel in the second word is a long "o." For example: A place to meditate would be a "zen zone."

Last week's challenge: There is a politician today, sometimes known by his or her full three-word name, whose initials are also the initials of a popular chain of restaurants. Who is the politician and what's the restaurant?

Answer: Hillary Rodham Clinton, Hard Rock Cafe

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NPR Story
6:35 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Ricky Martin Writes A 'Dreamer' For Children

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 11:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

He is a Grammy Award winner, an international music superstar, New York Times best-selling author. And now Ricky Martin has yet another accomplishment to add to his already impressive resume: children's author. Ricky Martin has just released his first children's book. It is called "Santiago the Dreamer: Land Among the Stars." Martin joins us from New York City. Thanks so much for being with us.

RICKY MARTIN: Thank you so much for having me. How are you, Rachel?

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NPR Story
6:35 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Father And Son Make A Slow Connection In 'Nebraska'

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 11:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. The tone and pace of "Nebraska," Alexander Payne's latest film, is set from the very beginning. The opening scene - an elderly man, bundled up in a well-worn coat is lumbering down the shoulder of a freeway on the outskirts of Billings, Montana. He could be lost in a dementia-fueled haze or on a clearly defined mission. The truth about that man, Woody Grant, turns out to be a bit of both. Here's director Alexander Payne.

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NPR Story
6:35 am
Sun November 17, 2013

The NFL Game Of The Season

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 11:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It is time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: Well, we've got a whole day of football ahead of us. But let's face it, all eyes are on one game in particular. The Kansas City Chiefs go to Mile High Stadium to play the Denver Broncos. Just one loss between the two of them, seems like a big deal. But is it, really?

The man with the answers, as usual, is NPR's Mike Pesca. Good morning, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hi. You've set up this question. Will I puncture it just by saying, yeah, it's a big deal.

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Photography
2:55 am
Sun November 17, 2013

In The Streets Of Iran, A Fashion Shoot Bursting With Color

A photo that was featured in FSHN Magazine's 2013 couture issue.
Afra Pourdad

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 11:24 am

Iran is a notoriously closed society, so this was an unusual milestone: It was recently the setting for a high-fashion magazine shoot, published in California-based magazine FSHN.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sun November 17, 2013

At The Tiny Desk Or A Sold-Out Arena, John Legend Delivers

John Legend's latest album, Love in the Future, is out now. Legend also appears on the soundtrack album for the film 12 Years a Slave.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 9:56 am

John Legend has a way of writing songs that create a sense of intimacy. The Grammy-winning soul singer recently performed at one of NPR's Tiny Desk Concerts. The performances are exactly what they sound like: just a musician in a cubicle with an audience that's really, really close — no frills, no fuss.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sun November 17, 2013

A Young Brit Takes On The American Songbook

Anthony Strong.
Thibault Stipal Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 11:24 am

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