The World

Monday through Friday from 7pm to 8pm
  • Hosted by Marco Werman

The World is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe, hosted by Marco Werman.

Make your way through the maze of seeking asylum in the US

Feb 21, 2018

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From PRI's The World ©2017 PRI

After every high-casualty mass shooting, there's a lot of heated political debate over how to interpret what happened and how to prevent the next one. The Parkland, Florida, tragedy is no exception, except that these days, the debates come with a steroid boost in the form of tweets that divide Americans even further.

Host Marco Werman speaks with Erin Griffith, a senior writer at Wired who wrote the article, "Pro-Gun Russian Bots Flood Twitter After Parkland Shooting."

The students, teachers, and administrators of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, have practiced how to respond to a school shooting.

Stay calm, stay in place. Those are the messages they had rehearsed during a routine active-shooter drill just days after returning from winter break. 

But still, 17 people died and 15 others were injured.

The county of Kent in southern England is a fairly peaceful place today — think rolling fields, cozy pubs and picturesque beaches. But it wasn’t always this way.

More than 2,000 years ago something terrible and violent happened here, near the present-day seaside villages of Deal and Walmer. In 55 B.C., it is believed that Julius Caesar’s forces made their first landing in Britain on the beach here, part of a project to push beyond the boundaries of the known world and claim new territory for Rome.

Ruby Ibarra's memories of hip-hop date back to childhood. 

"I was 4 years old ... and remember being in my family's home and watching one of those Filipino variety shows," said Ibarra, referring to popular programs broadcast both in the Philippines and on networks catering to the Filipino community in the United States.

Late last month, Abdul Aziz Adam posted a video on social media of a group of young men at a Manila airport. They were all glued to their cellphones, the blue light reflecting off of their faces.

"Last goodbye from Manila airport," Abdul Aziz said. "They will leave Manila to Los Angeles in couples of hours. Safe journey guys we will stay in touch. Big love from your brothers on Manus prison camps. Am sure the American people will give guys welcome at the airport."

I was fully booked during the Lunar New Year, with back-to-back patients in both Oakland and San Francisco, California.

I work with non- and limited-English speaking Vietnamese patients as a freelance medical interpreter at local hospitals. Outside the time dealing with doctors and nurses about medical conditions and diagnoses, I spend a good part of my time chatting with these patients.

A comic book hero offers a fresh vision of Africa

Feb 19, 2018

Marvel Comics' blockbuster "Black Panther" has stirred up all sorts of debate.

Hana Baba and Leila Day, hosts of the podcast The Stoop, checked it out this weekend. They tell The World's Marco Werman they were pleasantly surprised, even though they were more than a little worried going in. 

It’s a mystery fit for a Cold War-era spy novel. In late 2016, officials with the US embassy in Havana started hearing strange noises that seemed to be directed right at their homes or hotel rooms.

Most called it a high-pitched sound. Some said it sounded like grinding metal, while others compared it to a kind of hum. Many said they felt pressure changes too, like the feeling of driving down a highway with only one car window open.

No immigration bill as feds ink contract to monitor license plates

Feb 16, 2018

It was a busy week for immigration issues in Washington, DC — but it was also a busy week for immigration agents across the country who are stepping up arrests and finding new ways to track people.

Cherokee playwright Mary Kathryn Nagle is fighting for the rights of Native Americans both onstage and off. 

What can AI learn from non-Western philosophies?

Feb 16, 2018

As autonomous and intelligent systems become more and more ubiquitous and sophisticated, developers and users face an important question: How do we ensure that when these technologies are in a position to make a decision, they make the right decision — the ethically right decision?

It's a complicated question. And there’s not one single right answer. 

But there is one thing that people who work in the budding field of AI ethics seem to agree on.

Yoon Ji-young lays down slabs of fatty pork belly that sizzle and crackle as they touch the burning hot grill atop her kitchen table. Four months into her first pregnancy, the 35-year-old says she’s been caught off guard by the “weird” desires she’s had for meaty dishes that she typically avoids.

“I’ve had strong cravings for junk food, like hamburgers and fried chicken,” she says. “I don’t even like fried chicken at all!” 

How Chinese media covers US gun violence

Feb 16, 2018

Chinese state media often hypes American problems and foibles to redirect attention away from China’s poor human rights records. And yet, when it comes to American gun violence, it takes a measured tone.

I arrived in America on Thanksgiving Day 1981. It seemed to me then that music, like so many aspects of life in America, was racially demarcated: You had soul and R&B for African Americans, you had rock ’n’ roll and country western for white Americans.

So where does a refugee from Vietnam fit in?

The media frenzy around 17-year-old snowboarder Chloe Kim is deserved. She’s the youngest female snowboarder to win gold at the Winter Olympics. During competition on the halfpipe, she earned a near-perfect score while showing off her signature back-to-back 1080s — she’s the first to do the move in competition.

But beyond her athletic feats, the media and general public cannot seem to get enough of her and her family’s immigrant story. Chloe is a snowboarding prodigy who showed talent at a young age. Her father, Jong Jin Kim, nurtured her skills.

Editor's note: This piece's author, Amy Costello, is reporting on aid workers' experiences with sexual harassment and abuse. She would like to hear from you. Call us at 857-285-4157 and leave a confidential message. 

There are many things about the Parkland, Florida, high school massacre that are depressingly familiar. One is the weapon used by the 19-year-old suspect.

It was an AR-15. The same lightweight, semi-automatic rifle used in many other mass shootings, including Newtown in 2013, San Bernardino in 2015, and Las Vegas and Sutherland Springs last year. 

On the deck of the Razorbill, docked in the English port of Ramsgate, Steve Barratt runs thousands of feet of nets through a squeaky pulley, getting ready for another long night of fishing in the North Sea.

It’s a time-worn routine for him, but it has its rewards. As they whiz by, he snags a fish still stuck in one of the nets from the night before and tosses it to the side.

“That’s a Dover sole,” he says. “So that’ll be my dinner later!”

Back in 2010, a pivotal moment arrived for American craft beers at Munich's Oktoberfest.

“They announced, ‘The gold medal for the best Oktoberfest in the world went to — gasp — Samuel Adams' Octoberfest.' The air went out of the room,” said Jim Koch, founder of the Boston Beer Company, which brews Samuel Adams beer.

The governor of Puerto Rico, Ricardo Rossello, is coming to Philadelphia on Friday and will be meeting with local Latino leaders and clergy.

They'll be asking him to help release federal resources for Puerto Ricans who evacuated to the city after Hurricane Maria devastated the island last fall.

More than 800 families have evacuated from Puerto Rico to Philadelphia. And they’re still coming. Many of them have been able to stay temporarily with family and friends or in hotels. But some will have to leave their hotel rooms on Wednesday, and others by the end of March.

In their final Olympic appearance, the joint Korean women’s ice hockey team got off to a bad start, giving up two goals to Japan in just the first few minutes. They went on to lose 4-1, with Korean American Randi Heesoo Griffin scoring the team’s only goal of the Olympics.  

The new Marvel superhero movie "Black Panther" premiered in Kisumu, Kenya, Tuesday night. Kisumu is the hometown of actress Lupita Nyong’o, one of the film’s stars.

Tamerra Griffin, a Buzzfeed reporter based in Nairobi, was at the event and wrote about it.

In the fall of 2016, right before school started, Ana, a young mother of three teenagers, approached me in a panic: Her two sons, Leo and Angel, were stuck in immigration detention near the border and she couldn’t get them out.

For years, a large-scale offshore wind industry in the US seemed like it was always somewhere off over the horizon.  

But with the price of offshore wind power dropping quickly in Europe and the UK, policymakers in the US are increasingly looking at it as a viable option to meet renewable energy goals.    

Every weekday at 7 a.m. seafood wholesalers crowd into a warehouse on the docks in Grimsby, in northern England, to bid on yellow plastic tubs full of haddock, cod and plaice, touching and sometimes sniffing the product before they place their bids.

On one recent morning, the market auctioned off some 400 boxes, or about 20 tons of fish. That’s a slow day here, so the auction was over in about half an hour.

On a chilly November day, Sebastian Khan is kneeling on the floor of his home. He has short, dark hair and brown eyes. His tiny, soft hands grips the top of a yellow toy truck as he swipes it side to side.

Sebastian is 3 and curious about everything around him. He especially loves flying.

“When we’re going through the clouds,” he says, jumping up and opening his arms like wings, “I’m like, ‘Where am I?' Everything starts to look like toys."

In 2008, the allure of coming to the United States seemed like a two-way street for Chinmoyee Datta. The US would get a qualified teacher in a district that couldn’t find enough instructors and Datta would get to experience an entirely new country.

Kolkata-born Datta had been teaching at a Catholic school in a large and growing education hub in central India, the city of Jabalpur, for 11 years. Her husband was a principal at a government school. Like her, he had job stability and credibility in his profession. Their son would soon be in fourth grade.

When Emmanuel Macron was elected president of France last May, it was a victory over the extreme right and the candidacy of Marine Le Pen.

At 39, he became the youngest president in French history, and he had recently created his own political party, Republic on the Move. He was seen as a supporter of diversity, bringing more women into high-level positions. And when his party went on to win a majority in parliament, it brought power to political newbies.

There are a lot of reminders of the past in the northern English city of Hull. Defunct deep-sea trawlers and cavernous warehouses recall the city’s history as the hub of England’s fishing industry.

Today, though, Hull is also a vision of the future — a factory churning out massive wind turbine blades, each the size of a giant sequoia tree, and built almost entirely by hand out of balsa wood, fiberglass and gleaming white paint.

The German company Siemens recently set up shop here to supply the growing fleet of wind farms off the coast of the UK.