advertising

Charles Rex Arbogast / AP

Lawmakers passed the Fair Housing Act just one week after the assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. as riots flared in Pittsburgh and other cities. It was intended to protect buyers and renters from discrimination based on race, color, disability, religion, sex, familial status or national origin, but advocates argue the nation is still failing renters and homebuyers with disabilities and children, as well as those of color.

Bobby Caina Calvan / AP Photo

In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control unveiled a series of anti-smoking ads intended to shock viewers called "Tips From Former Smokers" -- they showed graphic images of former smokers and the lifelong effects the habit left on their bodies. The CDC has said the campaign increased quit attempts in the United States.

Liz Reid / 90.5 WESA

Dana Ash, 59, of Morningside has voted in every presidential election of the last 40 years. She said she considers herself an Independent and has voted for Republicans in congressional, state and local races, but never in presidential races. This year is no different.

Joe Raedle / Getty via NPR

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's campaign will begin airing its first television ads of the general election in the coming days, the campaign confirms to NPR.

The ads will air in Florida, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Nevada and North Carolina — all key battleground states where Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has taken leads or grown her leads in recent polls. 

Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Cancer centers across the U.S. have more than tripled the amount spent on advertising in the last decade, but a new report finds that doesn't equate to better care.

The report by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Indiana University, published in JAMA Internal Medicine this week, found that between 2005 and 2014, 890 for-profit and nonprofit cancer centers increased their total advertising expenditures from $54 million to $173 million. 

Marketing The Founding Fathers In Modern Culture

Apr 5, 2016
Dodge / Youtube

There's a public lecture taking place tonight on Penn State's New Kensington campus with a rather unusual title; "Muscle Cars, Lattes and Rooftop Grilling: How We Sell the Founders and Why It Matters." We'll talk with the speaker, Bowling Green University professor Andy Schocket. He says: "For a long time, we have slapped the names and images of the founders on products and services from life insurance to beer to plumbing. What is fairly new is how these recent advertisements, like so many facets of our lives, have become politicized."    

NFL/YouTube

What better way to celebrate the big game?

"In the end / when our team won / mom and dad looked at each other / one thing led to another that night."

NFL advertisers teamed with Seal to recreate "one of the greatest love songs of all time to celebrate the greatest game of all time," according to the caption posted on the NFL's YouTube channel on Monday.

Data suggests nine months after a Super Bowl victory, winning cities see a rise in births, according to the ad.

Heinz / YouTube

Scores of hot dog costume-wearing dachshunds run through a grassy field while Harry Nilsson’s 1972 ballad “Without You” plays in the background.

What can’t they live without?

Heinz Ketchup of course. And mustard. And barbeque sauce, represented here by humans in condiment costumes. The dogs leap upon them, licking their faces while the announcer says, “It’s hard to resist great taste. Meet the Ketchups.”

Kraft Heinz has been trying to build buzz around their family of condiments with the hashtag #MeetTheKetchups.