Brother's Brother Foundation

Carlos Giusti / AP Photo

The son of Pittsburgh Pirates legend Roberto Clemente is teaming up with two local groups to send critical supplies to Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria.

Brother's Brother Foundation and the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce announced they'd be gathering monetary donations, medical supplies and non-perishable foods for residents to deliver as soon as airplanes are allowed on the island.

According to the organization, 100 percent of disaster funds go to help people in affected areas.

South Carolina National Guard / Flickr

Brother’s Brother Foundation is continuing to monitor North and South Carolina as the water levels subside from last week’s record flooding.

“We may be involved again.” said Luke Hingson, the group's president. “I think it would be consumable cleaning supplies this time around. There isn’t a real medical emergency other than people need water.”

The devastating earthquake in Nepal last month killed thousands and displaced many more as homes, schools and medical clinics were left decimated in the weeks that followed.

One local charity is reaching out.

“Plea for Nepal: Special Concert” will begin at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Campbell Memorial Hospital at Chatham University. The show will feature performances from members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

Pittsburgh-based Brother’s Brother Foundation is partnering with members of the Ukrainian-American community and the U.S- Ukraine Foundation to package and send a tractor-trailer load of medical supplies for struggling hospitals on the front lines of Ukraine’s civil war.

A Pittsburgh-based charity is continuing its efforts to help fight the spread of Ebola in Africa. Brother’s Brother Foundation (BBF), which provides medical supplies, food and other humanitarian goods to countries around the world, will load another container of donated medical supplies and equipment  Tuesday for hospitals and clinics in Freetown, Sierra Leone. 

“If they know that more [medical supplies are] coming they will just use it faster and they’ll use it better, which means more protection for both the patient and the caregiver,” said BBF President Luke Hingson.

Pittsburghers Delivering Medical Aid to Ebola Victims

Aug 21, 2014
European Commission DG ECHO / Flickr

The Pittsburgh-based medical relief foundation Brother’s Brother has been trying to distribute medical aid throughout Western Africa since an outbreak of the Ebola virus began last spring. More than 1350 lives have been claimed by the virus, many were health care workers, according to the World Health Organization.

Luke L. Hingson, President of Brother’s Brother explains what workers face when treating people with Ebola.

“When people die in a hospital there is a feeling among the workers - should I go back to work? So you have smaller staffs helping these patients that have Ebola, plus, they have to carry out the regular work of the hospital.”

Hingson also explains how the 56 year-old foundation is keeping up with demand for these items in the affected regions.

“There is a need for 6 million exam gloves over the next sixth months," says Hingson.  "They have a supply right now of maybe two weeks, maybe three weeks. There is help coming. Every single medical person, not only wants to wear one exam glove, they want to put on two or three. There’s just such a risk of exposure, you get a pinprick of some type and the fluid gets through. There’s a much faster consumption of these medical supplies than ever before.”

An international humanitarian aid organization in Pittsburgh is assembling medical supply kits for healthcare workers treating Ebola patients in Africa.

Global Links has collected an estimated 1,000 gloves, goggles, gowns and masks; nearly all donated as surplus equipment from regional healthcare facilities.

“Through hospitals, through other health organizations, 95 percent of everything we send are recovered materials that would often end up in the landfill if we weren’t taking it,” Global Links CEO Kathleen Hower said.