Carnegie Museum of Art

Carnegie Museum of Art

Selections from two sweeping collections are coming together for a new exhibit opening Saturday at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

20/20 melds work from 40 artists usually featured half at CMOA and half at the Studio Museum in Harlem. Their collected work spans nearly 100 years.

Desiree Williams / Flickr

An immersive theater production will take visitors to places normally off-limits at the Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History. 

Mark Nootbaar / 90.5 WESA

If you have ever wondered how the Carnegie Museum of Art keeps it’s collection looking so good, the answer is Michael Belman.

Belman is the Objects Conservator for the museum. He evaluates proposed new purchases and checks items coming and going from the collection on loan.

But the biggest part of what he does is repair, restore and preserves three-dimensional fine art. Just keeping objects in the gallery dusted is an important first step. He talked to 90.5 WESA's Mark Nootbaar about his process. 

Their conversation has been edited for length and clarity.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Three mannequins wearing  garments of swirling metal mesh greet visitors at the entrance of the Iris van Herpen exhibit at the Carnegie Museum of Art. The translucent bunched material creates a soft cloud-shaped shadow on the platform below. 

Rachel Carlson / Yelp Pittsburgh

It may be the middle of winter, but that doesn’t mean you can’t find anything fun to do! WESA’s Sarah Kovash, Josh Raulerson and Rachel Carlson of Yelp Pittsburgh have you covered for a weekend full of fashionable – and tropical outings.

NASA

Humans have had a greater impact on the Earth than any other species in history.

“I mean, you can see it from space,” said Steve Tonsor, director of science and research at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. “If you see images from space at night, you see all the lights of human activities. That is really a sign of our consuming fossil fuels and turning them into light energy. If you see the images from space during the day, you see the vast acreages of land that humans have manipulated.”

No Place But Home / Youtube

Examine the life and storied career of Braddock-based filmmaker Tony Buba in a new documentary short produced in partnership between 90.5 WESA and Carnegie Museum of Art. The film, No Place but Home, was produced by Ryan Loew and Matthew Newton. It premiered last week at a CMOA event.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

Perched in the shadow of the Homestead Grays Bridge, Pittsburgh Public Schools teacher Tom Higgs flicked his index finger up and down a cracked Android screen.

'Zodiac Heads' To Loom Over CMOA Visitors This Summer

May 31, 2016
Matt Nemeth / 90.5 WESA

A dozen monolithic sculptures by the acclaimed Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei are on display at the Carnegie Museum of Art this summer.

Visitors to the museum's Hall of Architecture can stand in the shadows of the larger-than-life statues of "Circle of Animals / Zodiac Heads," which officially opened on Saturday. Each of the 12 bronze statues weighs between 1,500 and 2,500 pounds, and each depicts the head of an animal of the Chinese Zodiac.

Matt Nemeth / 90.5 WESA

Alison Knowles handles a "bean turner," an interactive art piece of her own creation, made of a stiffened cotton tube that’s filled with beans – reminiscent of a rain stick.

She's encouraging visitors of her upcoming exhibit at the Carnegie Museum of Art to pick up the bean turner and see what kinds of sounds they can make with it. While they're there, guests can peruse a variety of pieces gathered from across the octogenarian's five-decade career, which first began flourishing in the Fluxus performance art movement of the 1960s and '70s. 

Reflecting On The Design Of Peter Muller-Munk

Nov 20, 2015
Peter Muller-Munk / Carnegie Museum of Art

Peter Muller-Munk, a German immigrant to Pittsburgh, rose from being a relatively obscure silver smith to one of the top designers of consumer products in the 20th century. The Carnegie Museum of Art will be telling his story in a new exhibit titled “Silver to Steel.” Rachel Delphia, co-curator of Silver to Steel,  joins us to talk about the exhibit and the works of Muller-Munk.

    Can you believe Thanksgiving is next week? 2015 is slipping away until it’s gone forever, the winter onslaught arrives and the dark night feels like it arrives earlier and earlier…so HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

WESA’s Josh and Yelp Pittsburgh’s Rachel are here to cheer you up and get you ready for that festive time of year with some amazing events around town.

Let’s kick it off with Light Up Night. There are two celebrations going on- Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership’s 55th Annual Light Up Night and Duquesne Light Santa Spectacular. Come down to Market Square for the grand opening of the European Market. There is also a bigger and more spectacular ice rink this year at PPG Place. You’ll be able to catch Santa and his reindeer and get your #SelfiewithSanta in Santa’s custom workshop. Pittsburgh Symphony is doing a free concert, Friday November 20th at Heinz Hall as well. Basically if you go downtown you will be immersed in Christmas everywhere.

Roll Out The Reel For Pittsburgh's Home Movie Day

Nov 4, 2015
popturf / flickr

Long before everyone had video capability on their smartphones there was the home movie camera. Home Movie Day is a worldwide celebration of amateur films and filmmaking. Joining us with a preview of Pittsburgh’s Home Movie Day is Emily Davis, senior research associate for the time –based media project at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

Propeller Group/CMOA

The Living Need Light, The Dead Need Music is a new video exhibit opening at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Museum of Art on Friday. Created by the artist collective The Propeller Group, the lush film both documents and stages funeral traditions and public wake ceremonies in South Vietnam.

Showcasing Pittsburgh's Design Heritage

Oct 2, 2015
CMOA

The Hot Metal Modern exhibit, which opened last month, at the Carnegie Museum of Art, is the first in a series of exhibitions highlighting Pittsburgh’s role as a design center from the 1920’s through the 1960’s.

North Braddock Cares

North Braddock residents are using their own hands to rebuild the town’s parks with the first ever Build Day this Saturday at Recycle Park.

The park on the corner of Bell Avenue and Verona Street was once a vibrant park with playground equipment, lights, water and a pavilion, said Vicki Vargo, treasurer of North Braddock Cares, Inc. Over the years, wood and metal structures deteriorated with rust, and the only ones left nowadays are the pavilion and merry-go-round, she said. 

CMOA Collects Works By Edward Hopper

Jul 24, 2015
Patrons Art Fund / Carnegie Museum of Art

Opening this weekend at the CMOA is a new exhibit of works by famed American artist Edward Hopper. The exhibit will feature all 17 works by Hopper in the museum’s collection. Event curator Akemi May joined us for a preview.

Courtesy Carnegie Museum of Art

The Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History will once again open up their doors to all, with free admission Thursday evenings throughout March.

Spokesperson Leigh Kish said the free evenings are courtesy of the Jack Buncher Foundation.

“(The museums are) a big part of the community and we want everyone from the community to come in, knowing full well that price might be a barrier, or admission might (make it) difficult to bring a family,” Kish said.

Josh Staiger / Flickr

In a recent opinion piece for the Tribune Review, pop culture correspondent Joe Wos questions whether we’re seeing the death of the art museumRobin Nicholson, Director of The Frick, Jo Ellen Parker, President of the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, and Joe Wos talk about the future of art museums.

“You know they just had museum selfie day, you know where people came in and used art as backdrops to selfies and I think that’s the risk you run. Yes you want to embrace the technology but you don’t want to devalue the experience completely,” says Wos.

Robin rebuts by saying, “I love museum selfie day. I think that it is an amazing opportunity for an individual to engage in an individual work of art that they might never look at in the same detail again.”

Jo Ellen offers a final insight, “I don’t think technology threatens the extinction of our museums. I think it will support their evolution.”  

Wikipedia

 

Mood rings were a popular fad in the 1970’s. Flash forward and the concept of gaging our mood via a color is being applied to the Gulf Tower downtown.

An upcoming exhibit at the Carnegie Museum of Art will use the Gulf Tower Beacon to reflect the city’s mood.

We talk with Divya Rao Heffley, program manager for the Hillman Photography Initiative and Brad Stephenson, director of marketing for the Carnegie Museum of Art.

Traditionally, the color of a mood ring was said to change determining your mood at a given time.

In the past, the Gulf Tower beacon has displayed weather prediction lighting. Each tier signified with temperature or humidity levels. This week, the beacon will tell the people of Pittsburgh the mood of the city with two colors, red as negative and green as positive.

Stephenson simplifies the new project for the Gulf Tower:

“We're taking all of the Instagram images being posted in Pittsburgh and we are using these sentiment analysis tools to measure the attitude of the commentary on the Instagram photos. Then we are taking those and applying a score that will then say more green is positive and more red is negative. We are taking two sides of the tower and applying the green and two sides and applying the red so essentially its a bar chart that shows Pittsburgh commentary on Instagram more positive or more negative in real time at any given moment.”

The idea of the beacon is a lead up to an art show this Saturday, February 14, at the Carnegie Museum of Art called Antoine Catala: Distant Feel.

Deanna Garcia / 90.5 WESA

Photographer Duane Michals grew up in McKeesport, but it was a trip to Russia that prompted his foray into photography.

"So going to Russia, I figured I should take pictures, so I borrowed a camera," said Michals. "Though I did take a course in photography, I didn't even own a camera. And I didn't take a light meter because I thought if I owned a light meter that meant I was officially a photographer, and that would have been intimidating ... if I had never gone to Russia, I never would have been a photographer, it literally changed my life."

Carnegie Museum of Art

The Carnegie Museum of Art's current exhibition of Renaissance paintings that underwent serious forensic investigation is called Faked, Forgotten, Found.

Lulu Lippincott, the institution's Curator of Fine Arts looks at the science of art preservation and restoration, as well as the winding paths that these works have followed to Pittsburgh.

Lippincott says the museum was skeptical when they “rediscovered” a painting of Isabella de Medici while Lippincott was cleaning up the museum’s collection of art. So skeptical, in fact, they took it to be X-rayed.

What they found was outstanding. She says the X-ray revealed that the painting had been “painted over” in the Victorian era. People in that era had the wrong idea of Isabella de Medici for years.

As seen in the X-rays, Lippincott says it’s almost as though the painting was airbrushed to make de Medici look better.

The Pittsburgh Biennial has begun at the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) with a local artist showcasing his two-and three-dimensional works, and the Pittsburgh Glass Center is about to join in on the Biennial with a wide array of glass ideas.

The Pittsburgh Biennial is held roughly every other year, 2011 was the last one, and gives local Pittsburgh artists a chance to be featured by the galleries around the city.

Leeanne Schwartz / Hillman Photography Initiative CMOA

Pictures are said to be a way to capture moments forever and if one has enough pictures they can create a story. This thought is shared by the Hillman Photography Initiative at Carnegie Museum of Art.

They're seeking photos from Pittsburgh residents to tell the city’s story, a people's history of Pittsburgh.

Program Manager Divya Rao Heffley said the project is the first of its kind and the artists who thought of it, Melissa Catanese and Ed Panar are asking people to share stories and photographs.

Freed From Floppy Disks, New Warhol Art Is Discovered

Apr 24, 2014
The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

A cache of works by Andy Warhol has been unlocked from its digital jail and is about to seen by a wider audience for the first time. 

A multi-national team of computer scientists, art experts and museum employees “unlocked” the images from floppy disks created by technology that was cutting edge in 1980s but has long since gone defunct. 

Looking for something fun to do on a Thursday night? The Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History will be offering free admission on all Thursday evenings throughout March.

From 4-8pm everyone is admitted and parking is only five dollars after 5pm. “A lot of people might not be aware we are open on Thursday nights every week until 8, so if you’re having trouble finding time to come to the museum, you can always go on a Thursday night after work,” said Jonathan Gaugler, Media Relations manager for Carnegie Museum of Art.

Amazon

Last week the Carnegie Museum of Art posted a tweet with an old advertisement for a 1960 Westinghouse Center Drawer Refrigerator asking,

“Have you seen one of these in your garage or in your neighbor’s basement?”

Black Friday and Buy Local Saturday have come and gone, and Cyber Monday is just around the corner, but nonprofits across the region are hoping Pittsburghers will still have a little something in their checking accounts come Tuesday.

More than 7,800 organizations across the world are encouraging people to donate to charities and nonprofits to mark what has become known as Giving Tuesday.

The United Nations Foundation and 92d Street Y launched the initiative last year, and it trended globally on Twitter as #GivingTuesday.

Carnegie International

Founded in 1896, the Carnegie International is one of the world’s longest-running exhibitions of contemporary art. The International has become Pittsburgh’s premiere event for groundbreaking modern art. The 2013 Carnegie International marks the first time three curators have been chosen.

Daniel Baumann, Dan Byers, and Tina Kukielski were tasked with finding art which portrays a sense of place. One of the first things they all discussed was how an exhibition of international ambition, can have its roots in Pittsburgh, in a meaningful way.

Voting Underway to Save PA's 'Endangered Artifacts'

Sep 23, 2013

A statewide campaign top save Pennsylvania’s “Top 10 Endangered Artifacts” has begun.

Through Nov. 1, people can go online, vote, and if they want, give money to museums to help preserve their works.

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