Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Arts & Culture
3:30 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Race Tackled in New Exhibit at Carnegie Museum of Natural History

The RACE: Are We So Different? exhibit examines the issue through science, history and contemporary experience.
Credit courtesy of American Anthropological Association and Science Museum of Minnesota

A new exhibit opening at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History takes on the vast subject of race. The “Race: Are We So Different” exhibit examines the subject from several different angles.

“From the scientific angle: What is the science? What is the science involved in race? What is race? Is race real? The history of the idea of race and finally the contemporary lived experience of race.” said Cecile Shellman with the Carnegie Museum. “How is race played out, particularly in the United States of America?”

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Free Museum
5:35 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Free Admission at Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History

Looking for something fun to do on a Thursday night? The Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History will be offering free admission on all Thursday evenings throughout March.

From 4-8pm everyone is admitted and parking is only five dollars after 5pm. “A lot of people might not be aware we are open on Thursday nights every week until 8, so if you’re having trouble finding time to come to the museum, you can always go on a Thursday night after work,” said Jonathan Gaugler, Media Relations manager for Carnegie Museum of Art.

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Essential Pittsburgh
4:15 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

A Season for Bigger, Badder Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy has gotten bigger, badder, and more dangerous as CO2 levels have spiked.
Credit Zen Sutherland / Flickr


Global warming has had some unexpected consequences, some good, some bad, but perhaps none are quite so itchy as the explosion in poison ivy growth.

Because of the abundance of CO2 in the air of late, weed plants such as poison are thriving, and biologist Joylette Portlock claims that poison ivy “could be growing twice as fast” by the middle of the 21st century.

Around the country, people are facing rapidly growing  poison ivy, often with pan-sized leaves. With that increased size comes an increase in urushiol, the toxin that puts the “poison” in poison ivy.

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Science
1:57 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Scientists Discover the Oldest-Known Fossil Primate Skeleton

The oldest-known fossil primate was found encased in layers of rock near the course of the modern Yangtze River.
Credit Carnegie Museum of Natural History

A team of international scientists announced Wednesday the discovery of the oldest-known fossil primate skeleton, Archicebus achilles, uncovered in an ancient lake bed near the modern Yangtze River in China’s Hubei province.

Christopher Beard, curator of vertebrate paleontology at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, said the fossil’s discovery has profound implications for understanding eras of human evolution that remain shrouded in mystery.

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