CCAC

A Pennsylvania law in effect last month mandates that state-related or state-owned institutions of higher learning must offer in-state tuition to active-duty military, veterans and their dependents even if they don't reside in Pennsylvania.

The Community College of Allegheny County is hosting an open house for those directly affected by the change from 2 to 7 p.m. at all four of its campuses Thursday to showcase how the college can work with these families. 

CCAC North Library / flickr

 

  In 2013, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported on the expected influx of members of the military in classrooms under the GI Bill. Our guests experienced that transition first hand. Dwight Boddorf, Marine veteran and director of veterans services at the Community College of Allegheny County, joined fellow former Marine Theo Collins, executive producer of the documentary Project 22, in the studio to address how colleges and universities are accommodating veterans.

  Community colleges statewide have standardized their way to assess prior work and experience for college credits through Credit Fast Track.

The new system allows all 14 community colleges in the state to access the same website where students can apply for the program. After applying students will work with a faculty member in the area to review what work was done, and see if it applies to a course through a portfolio of their work. 

The Community College of Allegheny County has been awarded a grant for helping reluctant readers delve into topics such as censorship and intolerance with their Big Reads program.

The program, run by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), aims to get people who normally wouldn’t pick up a book — to read.

Barbara Evans, CCAC Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, said the grant enables them to do “authentic community outreach.”

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden visited the Community College of Allegheny County's West Hills Center campus in Oakdale Wednesday to announce system-wide reforms of federal job training programs.

Community College of Allegheny County trustees unanimously approved a proposal on Thursday that would help chip away at the school’s $3 million deficit.

CCAC will offer early retirement incentives and close its four childcare centers in an effort to cut costs.

CCAC spokeswoman Elizabeth Johnston said it’s unknown how many employees will take the early retirement option, but several hundred could be eligible.

The Community College of Allegheny County Board of Trustees has named Quintin B. Bullock as its ninth president.

Bullock is currently president of Schenectady County Community College in New York. He was appointed unanimously by the Board of Trustees after a national search.

“Dr. Bullock, really as I’ve described him to everyone, has what we were looking for,” said board Chair Amy Kuntz. “Being a community college president is such a unique position. It requires a skill set that is multi-dimensional.”

Nearly one in 10 high school students reported being physically injured by their significant other in 2012.

That’s according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and it’s something Pittsburgh’s Prime Stage Theatre wants to end.

The educational theater group is bringing its touring Teen Dating Awareness Program to CCAC’s Boyce Campus Tuesday as part of the YWCA’s Week Without Violence.

Started nearly 20 years ago, the week-long effort looks to educate the community on the dangers of violence through a series of education programs.

Enrollment at the Community College of Allegheny County is down 7.79 percent, but it might not be all bad.

As of this week, 17,641 students were enrolled for the college’s fall semester, compared to 19,131 students last September.

The college points to two reasons for the declining enrollment: the recession and high school graduation rates.

During hard economic times, many workers look to change careers and enroll in community colleges to fill an educational void, causing a spike in student enrollment.