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While hunger rates remain high in Pennsylvania, Governor Tom Wolf has issued an executive order to re-commit to the fight against hunger.

Emily Cleath, communications coordinator for Just Harvest, a non-profit advocacy group aimed at ending hunger, said hunger rates in Pennsylvania have not decreased for too long.

Although many activities children enjoy are fads, others endure through the generations.

The work of Eric Carle, author and illustrator of several children’s books such as “The Very Hungry Caterpillar,” published in 1969, is one of those enduring elements that children have enjoyed for several decades.  Starting June 13th at the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, kids can experience Carle’s work through the interactive exhibit “Very Eric Carle.”

Liz Reid / 90.5 WESA

June is officially “The Mentoring Partnership” month in Allegheny County and the city of Pittsburgh, as the program which helps thousands of mentors and mentees every year celebrates twenty years.

The Mentoring Partnership of Southwest PA began in 1995 and provides training, resources, research, and information about best practices to more than 500 partner organizations.

Students attending 15 area charter schools collected $11,000 for the Homeless Children’s Education Fund to help ensure the estimated 3,000 homeless students in Allegheny County receive a proper education.

“The students grabbed the idea,” said Jeremy Resnick, executive director and co-founder of Propel Schools. “They did everything from penny wars between classrooms to putting on a big art show and selling tickets for it. There was just a huge range of activity across the schools that the students led, and it’s inspiring.”

Raising a child is expensive, and not surprisingly, that cost has only increased over the past few decades. But tax relief to help families with children hasn’t kept pace with the increased cost.

The average cost of raising a child born in 2013 through age 17 is $245,340, according to the Department of Agriculture. That’s a 23 percent increase from 1960.

U.S. Sen. Bob Casey cited a study from Pew that said weekly expenses for children have increased from $87 in the '80s to $148 in 2013 — a 70 percent increase.

Fund To Help Cancer Patients Preserve Fertility

Mar 16, 2015

“I can’t imagine not having my daughter now,” said Amanda Hopwood-Brophy, who was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma at age 28.

She underwent fertility preservation treatments along with a chemotherapy regimen until being declared cancer-free. She now has a two year old daughter.

Allegheny Health Network (AHN) has launched a program to help more patients like Hopwood-Brophy have children even after undergoing cancer treatments.

The commonwealth needs more investment to ensure children have access to high-quality preschool and child care programs according to a report by the Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children (PPC).

The PPC releases the School Readiness report each year analyzing the commonwealth’s access to high-quality early learning programs.

About one in 13 children in the United States have a diagnosed food allergy, but according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation, there are many who remain undiagnosed and unprotected against the risks of a sudden, severe reaction.

PA House Bill 803, which would allow schools to stock and administer epinephrine, is an attempt to protect children with undiagnosed allergies who have reactions at school. Epinephrine is the primary treatment for anaphylaxis, a serious and potentially fatal allergic reaction which can cause throat-swelling, a rash, and a drop in blood pressure.

Allegheny County’s child welfare system was considered a “national disgrace” in the early ‘90s, but now it is being held up as a national model.

That’s according to Marc Cherna, director of Allegheny County Department of Human Services (DHS), who is the first person ever awarded the Casey Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Child Welfare Leadership.

The award presented by the Casey Family Programs recognizes someone who has contributed substantially to the field of child welfare.

Joey Spehar / Facebook

As a father, WYEP Morning Mix co-host Joey Spehar has a unique outlook on modern music. This led him to develop Cool Kids, a daily segment where listeners submit, “kid approved” songs and share stories about listening to quality music with their child.

“I’m a dad, my daughter’s almost two years old, and I found that she really enjoys music,” says Spehar. “I’m sure there are countless people out there who have had similar experiences.”

Dr. Rachel Whitcomb, assistant professor of music education at Duquesne University, says Spehar’s program touches on some important ideas in early childhood development.

Pittsburgh researchers have found the joints of children with chronic inflammatory arthritis contain immune cells similar to those of 90-year-olds.

A new study suggests premature aging of immune cells are linked to children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

The study, led by University of Pittsburgh professor of pediatrics and immunology Abbe de Vallejo, sampled immune cells called T-cells from 98 children with JIA.

The team found one-third of the T-cells in children had shortened “telomeres” that had reduced or lost the capacity to multiply.

United Way of Allegheny County announced its funding allocations for children and youth programs this week, giving $2.4 million to more than 15 programs.

United Way focused its attention on after school programs, summer programs, future leaders programs, college preparation programs and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs.

Alicia Chatkin, United Way’s director of programs for children and youth, said the funding is meant to help children in two age groups.

Michael Lynch / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh City Councilman Patrick Dowd announced Monday that he will be stepping down from his elected office to become the first executive director of “Allies for Children.”

Having served 5 ½ years on council, Dowd will resign next month. A special election for his replacement is expected in November.

Dowd, a former educator and member of the Pittsburgh Board of Education (2003-07), said “Allies for Children” is an opportunity to return to his love of educating children.

An empty lot in the Wilson neighborhood of Clairton will be transformed into a playground this weekend.

More than 200 volunteers will gather in Clairton Saturday to build a playground designed entirely by local children.

Volunteers from the Clairton Fire Department, the Unity Group of Clairton, local residents and organizers from KaBOOM!, a national nonprofit, are getting together to build the playground in just one day.

Wayde Killmeyer, superintendent of the Clairton City School District, said the new playground is long overdue.