Community College of Allegheny County


The Community College of Allegheny County is trying to get more of its students to finish with a degree or certificate.

CCAC participated in the Pennsylvania Community College Completion Challenge last week, which concludes with an open house at all eight locations from 2 to 7 p.m. Monday.

Mike Richards / 90.5 WESA

Dozens of students and retirees joined residents of Garfield, the North Hills and Penn Hills on Friday urging the Port Authority of Allegheny County to restore some bus routes in those communities. 

CCAC North Library

Dwight Boddorf thought he was going to make a career out of the military. But when he was medically discharged after an encounter with an improvised explosive device in Iraq, he said he wanted to switch gears and move as far away from the military as possible.

He now works in education as the director of military and veterans services at the Community College of Allegheny County.

Erika Beras / 90.5 WESA

In Jim Seagriff’s classroom at Taylor Allderdice High School, there are a half dozen furnaces and boilers. A small closet area is set up the way a basement would be. Goggle-clad teenagers adjust knobs on mock refrigerators.

These are HVAC students in the Career and Technical Education program.

On Thursday, Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) and Carlow University signed an agreement allowing students to earn their associates degree at CCAC and then seamlessly transfer to Carlow University.

“In so doing, together our two institutions are helping to ensure that future graduates have the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in our diverse and changing world,” said CCAC President Quintin Bullock.

Energy, Gas Industries Focus of CCAC Partnership

Oct 31, 2014

In an effort to attract more people to jobs in the oil and gas industries, the Community College of Allegheny County has partnered with the Energy Innovation Center (EIC) to provide hands-on training and workforce development programs.   

Educational programs will be offered at the new EIC Institute in the Hill District, CCAC president Quintin Bullock said. The Center will open in January.  The collaboration between CCAC and the center officially began this week with the signing of a memorandum.

Reading Day In Pittsburgh

Oct 6, 2014

Reading will be celebrated at the Carnegie Library in Oakland Tuesday October 7th as the Community College of Allegheny County joins forces with local libraries, high schools and correctional institutions to promote literacy in our county through its program The Big Read in Pittsburgh.

“Literature is transformative by its very nature, but to have different people and races connect with a novel, it allows them to ignite a love of reading through engaging activities,” said Barbara Evans, Big Read Project Director at CCAC. 

Pennsylvania lawmakers are planning a hearing they hope will foster discussion on growing Pittsburgh’s employment opportunities.

The House Democratic Policy Committee will hold a July 23 public hearing at the Community College of Allegheny County to discuss jobs and workforce development in the Pittsburgh area.

Liz Reid / 90.5 WESA

The Community College of Allegheny County’s mechatronics program trains students to work in high-tech manufacturing jobs, and President Barack Obama said Wednesday it’s the kind of program that should be available nationwide.

“What we want to do is we want to replicate your model across the country,” Obama said. “You’re doing something right that is making a difference in people’s lives, and we want to spread the word.”

Obama and Vice President Joe Biden were at CCAC’s West Hills Center campus in Oakdale to announce system-wide reforms of federal job training programs.

More than 200 students and faculty lobbied Tuesday for an increase in community college funding in the 2014-15 state budget.

The Pennsylvania Commission for Community Colleges wants a $12 million increase for the 14 community colleges throughout the commonwealth.  

Senate Democratic Leader Jay Costa (D - Allegheny), who is also a member of the Community College of Allegheny County’s Board of Trustees, joined them at the State Capitol rally.

Community College of Allegheny County trustees unanimously approved a proposal on Thursday that would help chip away at the school’s $3 million deficit.

CCAC will offer early retirement incentives and close its four childcare centers in an effort to cut costs.

CCAC spokeswoman Elizabeth Johnston said it’s unknown how many employees will take the early retirement option, but several hundred could be eligible.

CCAC's 'Big Read' Focuses On Vietnam War

Mar 3, 2014

During March, the Community College of Allegheny County will be reminding Pittsburghers to enjoy a good book.

The Big Read, a national program funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, will bring together organizations around the region to promote literacy.

“What we hope this will do for literacy is to spark an interest in reading because reading is good for the soul, it elevates the mind, it promotes critical thinking and it helps you to experience other cultures,” said Barbara Evans, associate dean of academic affairs and Big Read project director at CCAC.

The Community College of Allegheny County Board of Trustees has named Quintin B. Bullock as its ninth president.

Bullock is currently president of Schenectady County Community College in New York. He was appointed unanimously by the Board of Trustees after a national search.

“Dr. Bullock, really as I’ve described him to everyone, has what we were looking for,” said board Chair Amy Kuntz. “Being a community college president is such a unique position. It requires a skill set that is multi-dimensional.”

Enrollment at the Community College of Allegheny County is down 7.79 percent, but it might not be all bad.

As of this week, 17,641 students were enrolled for the college’s fall semester, compared to 19,131 students last September.

The college points to two reasons for the declining enrollment: the recession and high school graduation rates.

During hard economic times, many workers look to change careers and enroll in community colleges to fill an educational void, causing a spike in student enrollment.

Can Community Colleges Save the Economy?

Jul 30, 2013
CCAC North Library

Though they are sometimes mocked and often overlooked in the conversation about post-secondary education, community colleges are playing an important role in the reinvention of the American workforce.

With the costs of public and private universities skyrocketing and a changing economy that demands of a bevy of new skills, community colleges have become the primary option for many students seeking to gain crucial skills at a lower cost.

Community College of Allegheny County President Alex Johnson is leaving Pittsburgh to head up a community college in Cleveland.

Johnson, who became president of CCAC in 2008, has been appointed president of Cuyahoga Community College. He is expected to begin duties there on July 1, according to a news release from CCAC.

Johnson had previously served as chancellor of Delgado Community College in New Orleans and was president of Cuyahoga Community College's Metropolitan Campus from 1993 to 2004.

As community college officials continue their fight for more state funding, the Pennsylvania Senate is considering a bill that would convene a task force on community college affordability.

“I don’t think there has been any organized effort to really review how community colleges are funded, particularly at the state level and the local level,” said Alex Johnson, president of the Community College of Allegheny County. “Over time the funding from various sources, particularly government sources, has eroded to the extent that students have the burden.”

Speaking Volumes on Essential Pittsburgh: Alex Johnson

Mar 11, 2013
Josh Raulerson/90.5 WESA

It may not be Hogwarts, but Community College of Allegheny County president and Harry Potter fan Alex Johnson is passionate about his school. He shares his reading recommendations with 90.5 WESA Morning Edition Host Josh Raulerson.