Driver's License

Keith Srakocic / AP

Two Philadelphia men sued Governor Tom Wolf and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation this week for automatically suspending their driver’s licenses when they were convicted of minor drug offenses.

Keith Srakocic / AP

Two men are suing Pennsylvania's governor and Transportation Department officials to challenge a state law that suspends driver's licenses for even the most minor drug convictions.

Ted S. Warren / AP

Pennsylvania is getting yet another extension to comply with a federal law that requires driver's licenses meet anti-terrorism standards.

Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf's announced Friday that the state received another deferment from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

Pennsylvania residents can use their current drivers' licenses to continue accessing federal facilities like courthouses and prisons through next Oct. 10, when a new restriction that also affects commercial air travel takes effect.

Ted S. Warren / AP

Pennsylvania lawmakers on Wednesday voted overwhelmingly for a bill designed to comply with federal identification standards for people who want to fly or enter federal facilities.

The House passed the Real ID bill 190-1, and Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf said he will sign it.

The measure gives residents the option to obtain a driver's license or other ID that meets the rules of a 2005 federal law enacted in response to the Sept. 11 terror attacks. Residents would also be allowed to get a noncompliant, traditional driver's license or ID.

Pennsylvania Department of Motor Vehicles

Federal authorities are giving Pennsylvania a few more months to comply with a 2005 federal law that requires people to prove they are legal U.S. residents in order for their driver's licenses to be valid for federal purposes.

haljackey / Flickr

PennDOT and the state Departments of Aging and Insurance are reminding older drivers to evaluate their driving abilities as part of "Older Driver Safety Awareness Week." 

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, drivers age 85 and older are nearly twice as likely to crash compared to drivers between the ages of 16 and 19.

PennDOT

Some Pennsylvanians will be receiving new driver’s licenses after PennDOT officials learned Wednesday a vendor error led to security flaws in more than 100,000 cards.

According to PennDOT, the laminate supplied by Morpho Trust USA and its subcontractor OpSec, did not include the correct hidden security image. Viewed under an ultraviolet black light, proper licenses show a row of keystones with the letters “PA.” The defective cards read “AP” instead.