Duquesne University

Economy & Business
3:30 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Accelerator Program At Duquesne University To Focus On Minority Entrepreneurs

From 1990 to 2012, the number of Hispanic entrepreneurs in America tripled from 577,000 to more than 2.0 million, and to address the growing population a new accelerator program at Duquesne University will focus on minority entrepreneurs.  

“Really what an accelerator means is that, you’re going to intervene and offer services that are really going to… accelerate the growth of that business, beyond what they might be able to do alone,” said SBDC Director Mary McKinney.

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Remembering 9/11
7:53 am
Thu September 11, 2014

How Artifacts Changed The Telling Of Sept. 11 Attacks

Before the fires were extinguished or the cleanups began, archivists from the Smithsonian museums had already started collecting artifacts from the sites of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

Thirteen years later, Alima Bucciantini, an assistant professor of public history at Duquesne University, wants to know what kind of impact the immediate exhibition of these objects had on the telling of the story of 9/11.

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History
3:30 am
Sun September 7, 2014

Gathering Discusses Whether Nixon’s Pardon Was The Right Decision 40 Years Ago

Forty years ago tomorrow, President Gerald Ford appeared on national television declaring he had granted former President Richard Nixon a full pardon for his involvement in the Watergate scandal.

While the infamous investigation has been extensively publicized and analyzed, Ford’s reasoning behind the pardon mostly remains an untold story.

That’s according to Ken Gormley, Duquesne University’s Dean of Law, who is coordinating Monday’s event along with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, at which major players in Ford’s decision recount their involvement.

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Water Quality
4:13 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

What is the Quality of Pennsylvania’s Water? It’s Getting Better

Before the implementation of the Clean Water Act, Pittsburgh’s rivers were so polluted, they barely even had fish, according to Brady Porter, Duquesne University associate professor of biology.

“Not any for commercial fishing or recreational fishing,” Porter said. “They were dead, they [the rivers] were basically sewers where our abandoned mine water would flow orange.”

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Higher Education
3:30 am
Tue June 10, 2014

In Pittsburgh's New Economy, Organized Labor Reorganizes

Organizers Robin Sowards and Clint Benjamin at USW headquarters in downtown Pittsburgh, two blocks away from the campus of Point Park University. PPU adjunct faculty are voting this month on whether to join the Steelworkers.
Credit Josh Raulerson / 90.5 WESA

  Like any English professor, Clint Benjamin spends a lot of his time grading papers.

“There’s a mountain – a teetering Matterhorn of papers at the end of the weekend, or during the week,” Benjamin said. “You’ve just gotta get through them.”

By his own estimate, Benjamin spends 30 to 40 hours a week on grading alone. He also has to attend meetings, answer emails, keep office hours, and commute between the Community College of Allegheny County and Duquesne University campuses, where in a typical week he prepares and teaches five sections’ of English and writing classes.

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Higher Education
2:14 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Duquesne Law's 100th Class Prepares For Graduation

When the first graduates from the Duquesne University School of Law received their diplomas, Woodrow Wilson was president and baseball legend Babe Ruth was just making his major league debut.

That was 1914. Now, the 100th graduating class is preparing to take the stage.

Ken Gormley, dean of the Duquesne University School of Law, said there are a lot of similarities between the two graduating classes.

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Sports
7:42 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Pittsburgh Hosts World's Biggest Sport Conference

With the nicest baseball park in the country, the most Super Bowl wins in the NFL and two of the best players in the NHL, Pittsburgh is definitely a sports city.

That’s why it will be the host of the North American Society of Sports Management (NASSM) Conference - the largest sports business gathering in the world.

Duquesne University organized the conference that aims to show how important business is to sports.

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Biotech Lab
3:50 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

New Bio Lab To Be Open To All Pittsburghers

Unless you're attending a university, most Pittsburghers do not have access to microscopes, pipettes, and other high-end scientific equipment — but a new lab opening this fall aims to change that.

Duquesne University and entrepreneurial group Urban Innovation 21 are constructing Pittsburgh’s first community biotechnology laboratory.

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Higher Education
10:49 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Duquesne Combines Biomedical Engineering, Nursing

Duquesne University plans to offer a five-year undergraduate degree program combining biomedical engineering and nursing starting this fall.

Spokeswoman Karen Ferrick-Roman says the program is believed to be the first undergraduate program of its kind.

School officials say biomedical engineers typically lack clinical experience in dealing with patients, but that nursing training would remedy that.

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Duquesne Exhibit
2:03 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Art Exhibit to Open at Duquesne

Duquesne University will open an art exhibit by Andrew Hairstans called A Model for Asylum Tuesday at the Les Idees Gallery on Duquesne’s campus.

Hairstans said the exhibit focuses on a housing project in Glasgow, Scotland. He said the project has to do with modernist British housing and how it is used by asylum seekers.

“I became interested in the area because originally they were at one point the tallest housing complexes in Europe and they were also used to house at one point they were used to house asylum seekers from all over the world really."

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Social Justice
3:30 am
Mon March 17, 2014

Community Leaders Try to 'Transform Learning' in Pittsburgh

“We should be outraged that not all of our young people are succeeding and learning to their potential,” says Olga Welch, dean of Duquesne University’s School of Education.

Welch and the university are leading a collaboration of community leaders to transform learning in the Pittsburgh region by pushing for public education as a social justice right “impacting all children, particularly those in under-represented populations.”

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Environment & Energy
3:30 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Duquesne University Hosts Fracking Conference

More than two dozen researchers meet Monday at Duquesne University as part of a symposium on the latest findings regarding Marcellus Shale drilling.

Foundation-funded researchers from universities including Carnegie Mellon, Cornell, Duke and Yale presented their independent research on topics such as air quality, human and animal health, effects on water treatment plants and local government response to shale gas development.

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Social justice
10:15 pm
Wed October 23, 2013

Community Leaders Seek Social Justice in Public Education

“If the people of Pittsburgh loved their children as much as they love the Steelers, the schools would be in great shape,”  said Professor Pedro Noguera from NYU’s School of Culture, Education and Human Development

He as a keynote speaker at Duquesne University Wednesday at a forum on  social justice in public education for poor minority students. 65 educational, community leaders, parents and students gathered  to determine how to seek fairness and equality in public education for children and youth in under-represented populations.

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History
4:36 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

80-Year-Old Atlas Gets a Digital Facelift

According Rob Nelson, guest lecturer at Duquesne University’s annual History Forum and director of the Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond, the last great historical atlas was published in 1932. It was called "The Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States," and it included a series of maps that illustrated how the nation changed over time.

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Essential Pittsburgh
5:45 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Adjuncts: Wage & Benefit Disparities In Higher Education

Discussing pay and benefits for adjunct professors
Credit Earlham College / Flickr

The story of Margaret Mary Vojtko, an adjunct professor at Duquesne University has gone viral and it’s sparked a debate about fair compensation for adjuncts.

Dan Kovalick, senior associate general counsel of the United Steelworkers (the union currently seeking to organize adjunct instructors at Duquesne) who wrote the op-ed piece believes that the adjuncts should have an increase in pay and should be entitled to benefits. Kovalick argues that, with heads of Universities making six-figure salaries and in some cases millions of dollars, teachers should be able to get an increase in compensation.

He also points out that parents of students, are spending tens of thousands of dollars on their child’s tuition and seeing that their child’s teachers are not making a livable wage.

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Community
1:07 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Local Universities to Mark Sept. 11th Anniversary

A pair of local universities will mark the 12th anniversary of the attacks of September 11th in very public but very different ways. 

Chatham University will gather Wednesday afternoon on the quad for a moment of silence, a short speech from the Dean of Student Affairs office, remarks from a representative of the Wounded Warrior Project and a performance of the National Anthem by the Chatham University Choir. 

The goal of the event is not only to remember the lives lost on Sept. 11, 2011, but also to salute the growing number of students on campus who are also veterans. 

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Essential Pittsburgh
4:14 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Duquesne Professor Develops Technology That Uncovers Rowling's Pseudonym

Joula has developed a technology that uses an author's vocabulary and style to determine possible pseudonyms.
Credit Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Duquesne University Professor Patrick Joula received an email from the London Sunday Times last week.  The Times was asking him to utilize an authorial identification technology he had been developing for years in order to determine if the new crime novel, The Cuckoo’s Calling was written by the famous J.K. Rowling. The paper had received an anonymous tweet indicating the author, Robert Galbraith, was actually Rowling. 

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U.S. Supreme Court
9:25 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

SCOTUS Justice Clarence Thomas Visits Duquesne University

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas spoke at Duquesne University Tuesday afternoon on topics ranging from his childhood in segregated Georgia to his 22-year tenure on the nation's highest court.

Thomas is the only black justice to serve on the Supreme Court after Thurgood Marshall. Thomas filled Marshall's vacated position on the bench.

Born in Pin Point, Ga. in 1948, Thomas said he grew up in a poor black community, but he was pushed toward academic success by his grandfather and the nuns at his Catholic school.

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Pennsylvania
10:59 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Judge Tosses Suits by 3 Wounded Duquesne Players

A federal judge in Pittsburgh has dismissed lawsuits by three former Duquesne University basketball players who sued the school, claiming it was responsible when two men shot them after an on-campus dance in 2006.

But U.S. District Judge David Cercone's ruling, first reported by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on Monday, says the school isn't responsible for the pain, damages and loss of income claimed by Shawn James, Stuard Baldonado and Kojo Mensah. They were three of five players wounded in the shooting on Sept. 17, 2006, following a dance sponsored by the Black Student Union.

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Essential Pittsburgh
9:00 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Choosing a New Pope

Cardinal Jorge M. Bergoglio SJ (later to become Pope Francis) celebrating mass in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He's the first Latin American Pope.
Credit Aibdescalzo / Wikipedia

It was white smoke and a new Pope Tuesday evening. The Pittsburgh Tribune Review Middle East correspondent, Betsy Hiel has been covering the historic event from Vatican City. She talks about reactions in Rome to the selection of Pope Francis.

And Pope Francis decided to adopt the name of the patron saint of the environment and animals--St Francis of Assisi. Catholic nuns who have devoted their lives to living in the way of St Francis were over the moon when the announcement was made. Our content partners at the Allegheny Front talked with the Sisters of St Francis of the Providence of God Convent in the White Hall section of Pittsburgh about the 12th century saint.

Then, Protocol and ceremony are always part of the selection of a new Pope. So what goes on behind the scenes in the Conclave? What went into the selection of Pope Francis, the first Latin American Pope? What's next for him? Duquesne University Law Professor and Canon Law Scholar, Nicholas Cafardi  talks about the conclave and the papacy.

Education & Learning
10:43 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Duquesne University Focuses on Africa

Duquesne University's Center for African Studies is hosting three days of events starting Tuesday, which will explore student and faculty connections to Africa.  All events begin at 4:30 p.m. and are free and open to the public.  

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Education & Learning
10:23 am
Mon February 25, 2013

Cooper Foundation Honors Duquesne Students

Five African-American students at Duquesne University are the first recipients of scholarships awarded to honor the legacy of Chuck Cooper, one ofthe greatest basketball players in Duquesne history.

Cooper was the first African-American drafted into the NBA and after a six-year career returned to school to earn a master's degree in social work at the Univeristy of Minnesota in 1961.  Cooper worked as Director of Parks and Recreation for the City of Pittsburgh and later as Urban Affairs Officer for Pittsburgh National Bank, now PNC.

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