Eclipse

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher / NASA

It is indeed dark during the day as a total solar eclipse makes its way from Oregon to South Carolina. Eleven states are in the path of total darkness. Follow the astronomical phenomenon's journey across America along with NPR journalists and others experiencing the eclipse.

Charlie Riedel / AP

Pennsylvania's top prosecutor wants to make sure people don't get burned by glassed they've bought to view Monday's solar eclipse.

Attorney General Josh Shapiro says folks should check to make sure their glasses have filters recommended by NASA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, which runs the nation's space exploration program.

Shapiro says the fake glasses don't have the NASA-recommended filters and people who try to view the eclipse using them could hurt their eyes.

Evan Vucci / AP

Pittsburgh government and faith leaders invited the public to events this weekend "to come together during a trying time," Mayor Bill Peduto said Wednesday.

The events are a reaction to violent protests in Charlottesville, Va., last Saturday when white supremacist groups rallied over the removal of a Confederate statue and fought with counter protesters, including Heather Heyer, who was killed when a car slammed into the crowd.

screengrab via nasa.gov

There’s no shortage of excitement surrounding Monday’s solar eclipse.

Though Pittsburghers won’t be able to view a total eclipse (states south of Pittsburgh will get the full experience), we’ll still get about 80 percent coverage, according to NASA.

If you’re in the city or outside, you can check out what your view will look like on this Jet Propulsion Laboratory app:

R. Baer and S Kovac / Citizen CATE Experiment via AP

A Pennsylvania school district says children won't be let outside for recess during the Aug. 21 solar eclipse because of the potential harm to students who look at the sun.

The Cumberland Valley School District sent a letter to parents Monday saying the decision was made after consulting the district's physician.

The letter says district officials recognize that the opportunity to view an eclipse is rare, but the safety of students is more important.

NASA officials recommend viewing the eclipse through specially-made glasses to prevent eye damage.