Gun Law Reform

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

Gun-rights supporters crowded into the Capitol Rotunda in Harrisburg Monday to rally for their Second Amendment rights.

Representative Daryl Metcalfe (R-Butler) organized the annual event and said “the left is out of control” in proposing restrictions.

Matt Nemeth / 90.5 WESA

State House lawmakers have completed their final session in a two-week series of Judiciary Committee hearings on gun violence.

They were inspired by the call for tougher gun laws in the wake of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla. that killed 17 people.

Despite some agreement on the importance of the issue, lawmakers are struggling mightily with solutions.

They tangled over one proposal after another, from expanding background checks, to arming teachers, to mandating schools install metal detectors, to banning AR-15 style weapons

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

As an elementary school choir sang inside the Capitol rotunda on Friday, a group of men and women clad in military fatigues, carrying walkie talkies and AR-15s, gathered just outside.

“We live in a society where we give lazy kids who come in eighth place trophies,” shouted one man, who left before giving his name. “Alright? It’s not a gun problem, it’s a mental problem.”

Christian Yingling wore a patch on his camouflage jacket declaring him part of the Pennsylvania Lightfoot Militia.

He’s from Westmoreland County, and on most days, works as a machinist.

Tom Wolf / Flickr

Three weeks after the school shooting in Parkland, Fla. that left 17 dead, there seems to be some momentum for action on gun reform bills in Congress and in the legislatures of states, including Florida and Pennsylvania.

Jacqueline Larma / AP

A bipartisan group of U.S. senators want state law enforcement to be alerted when someone who isn't allowed to buy a gun tries to purchase one.

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department / AP

At Friday’s symposium “Responsible Reporting of Gun Violence” at the University of Pittsburgh, researchers discussed how to prevent mass shootings.

Russell Palarea, an operational psychologist who works in Bethesda, Maryland, works to thwart intentional and targeted acts of violence. He said that it’s a myth that people snap and then commit mass violence.

Rick Bowmer / AP

Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf is urging Pennsylvania lawmakers to outlaw devices known as bump stocks used in the Las Vegas mass shooting that allow semi-automatic weapons to mimic the rapid fire of an automatic weapon.

Wolf's statement on Tuesday comes on the heels of several lawmakers saying they will introduce legislation to outlaw the devices. Wolf calls them "unnecessary and dangerous."