hurricane maria

Kathleen J. Davis / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburghers have collected and sent millions of pounds of humanitarian supplies to Puerto Rico since the island was struck by hurricanes Irma and Maria last September. Efforts are ongoing, and have been led by Brother's Brother Foundation and the Pittsburgh Pirates.

John Bender / Rhode Island Public Radio

For thousands of Puerto Ricans displaced by Hurricane Maria, this will be a difficult Christmas.

Provided photo from Rosana Guernica

More than three weeks after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, many residents of the island are still struggling to gain access to clean drinking water, electricity and lifesaving medicines.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

It's been more than two weeks since Hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico—knocking out the power grid, leaving people homeless and hospitals with dwindling supplies. Despite President Donald Trump's comments contrasting the storm to a "real catastrophe like [Hurricane] Katrina," many in Pittsburgh are eager to respond to the island's needs.

Carlos Giusti / AP Photo

The son of Pittsburgh Pirates legend Roberto Clemente is teaming up with two local groups to send critical supplies to Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria.

Brother's Brother Foundation and the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce announced they'd be gathering monetary donations, medical supplies and non-perishable foods for residents to deliver as soon as airplanes are allowed on the island.

According to the organization, 100 percent of disaster funds go to help people in affected areas.