Jerry Sandusky

Matt Rourke / AP

The defense is set to begin presenting its case in the criminal trial of Penn State's former president.

Graham Spanier is accused of mishandling complaints that former football coach Jerry Sandusky was molesting boys.

Spanier is charged with two counts of child endangerment and one count of conspiracy, all felonies.

The third day of testimony is scheduled for Thursday.

The prosecution wrapped up its case Wednesday with testimony from two former high-ranking administrators, who until last week had faced the same charges.

Prosecutor: Not Reporting Jerry Sandusky Let Pure Evil 'Run Wild'

Mar 21, 2017
Matt Rourke / AP

The failure of Penn State's former president to report child molestation accusations against Jerry Sandusky allowed evil "to run wild," prosecutors said Tuesday at the start of Graham Spanier's trial. A defense attorney accused prosecutors of trying to "criminalize a judgment call."

Opening statements got underway in the long-delayed criminal trial against Spanier, who faces felony charges of child endangerment and conspiracy for how he handled a 2001 report that the former assistant football coach had abused a boy in a team shower.

Jury Selection Begins In Penn State Ex-President's Trial

Mar 20, 2017
Matt Rourke / AP

Jury selection began Monday in the trial of Penn State's former president on charges that he put children at risk by mishandling child sex abuse complaints about retired assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

Centre County Correctional Facility / AP

One of Jerry Sandusky's sons was arrested Monday on multiple sexual offense charges involving children, more than five years after the former Penn State assistant coach was himself first arrested.

Jeffrey S. Sandusky, 41, a stalwart supporter who attended many of his father's court proceedings, was charged with 14 counts, according to court records. He was jailed on $200,000 bail.

His defense lawyer, Lance Marshall, declined to comment on the allegations.

Matt Rourke / AP

 

Penn State's former president says he issued a statement calling criminal charges against two of his lieutenants groundless because he'd known and worked closely for them for 16 years.

Graham Spanier testified Thursday in the defamation and whistleblower lawsuit against the university by former assistant football coach Mike McQueary.

Spanier compared former vice president Gary Schultz and former athletic director

Tim Curley to Boy Scouts, saying they had a history of being completely straightforward with him.

Lawyer: Penn State Not To Blame For Ex-Coach Not Getting Job

Oct 17, 2016
Gene J. Puskar / AP

 

It's not Penn State's fault that a former assistant football coach who reported Jerry Sandusky sexually abusing a boy 15 years ago can't find a new coaching job, a lawyer for the university said Monday.

Nancy Conrad said during opening statements in Mike McQueary's defamation and whistleblower lawsuit that because he spent his entire career at Penn State, he hasn't developed the network of contacts needed to find a new position.

Daveynln / Flickr

 

Pennsylvania's auditor general has announced a review of Penn State University's performance, focusing on governance, safety and tuition across its 24 campuses.

Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said Tuesday that his audit will revisit former auditor general Jack Wagner's recommendations to the university following the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse case, as well as compliance with state and federal guidelines. He says it won't rehash the university-commissioned 2012 report by former FBI Director Louis Freeh.

Carolyn Kaster / AP Images

New information in the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal shocked many Thursday when a line in a court document alleged Penn State University head coach Joe Paterno was aware of Sandusky's molestation of children as early as 1976. PennLive reporter Charles Thompson broke the story and joined us with the context of the allegations and how PSU fans have responded.

Legislation that was intended to require more people who work with children to get criminal background checks might have actually created a loophole for doctors and other hospital personnel.

“Something just got lost” when the bill was crafted, said state Sen. Randy Vulakovich, an Allegheny County Republican.

The bill was one of 20 approved over the last three years to update the Child Protective Services Law in the wake of the child molestation scandal involving former Pennsylvania State University Assistant Football Coach Jerry Sandusky.

Judge In Jerry Sandusky Case Seeks Info On Grand Jury Leaks

Oct 29, 2015
Gene J. Puskar / AP Photo

BELLEFONTE — The judge handling convicted child molester Jerry Sandusky's appeal ordered Pennsylvania's attorney general on Thursday to provide him and the former Penn State assistant football coach's lawyers any information she might have about possible leaks in the case by state prosecutors and a grand jury judge.

Judge John Cleland gave Attorney General Kathleen Kane one week to provide, under seal, information about "who, what, when and how this information was released."

Navigating New State Background Check Requirements

Aug 11, 2015
Alan Levine / flickr

Following the Jerry Sandusky child abuse scandal, members of the Pennsylvania legislature introduced a long list of bills intended to keep children safer, forced professionals to better report suspected abuse and make it easier for victims to get help.  While most of those bills never moved out of committee, many of them became laws.  Cathy Utz, deputy secretary for the Office of Children, Youth and Families in the Department of Human Services keeps track of those laws and shares her knowledge on the program.

Casey Chafin / 90.5 WESA

  The first grants from the endowment created with $60 million fine imposed after the Jerry Sandusky scandal are ready to be distributed this fall.

Josh Shapiro, chairman for the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency, said child advocacy centers will be the recipients.

A state lawmaker wants to launch an overhaul of the type and number of board members directing Penn State University's Board of Trustees.

In the wake of the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal, 31 Penn State alumni ran for three seats on the board. Months later, the new group approved changes in the make up of the board to allow for more student and staff representation.

Pennsylvania Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne), who received his bachelor's and master's degrees from PSU in 1993 and 2004, respectively, said this week those measures aren't enough.

(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File

A poll says Pennsylvanians overwhelmingly want Penn State to put back a statue of former football coach Joe Paterno that was removed after Jerry Sandusky's child molestation conviction.

The Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday said the majority — 59 percent to 25 percent — favored restoring the statue to a prominent place on campus.

Pennsylvanians also strongly support a recent deal between Penn State and the NCAA that restored 112 wins to the football team and Paterno's status as winningest coach in major college football.

State Supreme Court Suspends McCaffery

Oct 23, 2014
PA National Guard / Flickr

The state Supreme Court has suspended one of its own, Justice Seamus McCaffery, with pay. The suspension is a response to McCaffery's admitted exchange of sexually explicit emails with people in the state attorney general's office, among other things. 90.5 WESA's capitol correspondent Mary Wilson provides an update from Harrisburg.

College sports' governing body says it is willing to let Pennsylvania control the $60 million fine Penn State is paying over its handling of the Jerry Sandusky molestation scandal.

The NCAA on Friday asked Commonwealth Court Judge Anne Covey to dismiss the lawsuit filed by Sen. Jake Corman and Treasurer Rob McCord.

The NCAA says that if Covey agrees, it also will move to end a federal lawsuit against McCord, Gov. Tom Corbett and others that challenges a 2013 state law requiring the money to remain within Pennsylvania.

The Penn State University (PSU) Board of Trustees will meet 8 a.m. Wednesday by phone to discuss a potential settlement of a lawsuit between state officials and the NCAA over the use of the $60 million fine PSU was ordered to pay in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal.

In 2012, PSU consented to a number of sanctions imposed by the NCAA in response to attempts by high-ranking university officials to hide Sandusky’s molestation of young boys. The consent decree included a $60 million fine to be used for programs for the protection of children.

Deanna Garcia / 90.5 WESA

The office of Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane released a report Monday regarding Tom Corbett's handling of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse investigation when he was Attorney General. Patriot News opinions editor John Micek talked about how the findings of Kane's office could impact Governor Corbett's chances of re-election.

The Attorney General’s report found no evidence of Corbett mishandling the investigation due to political influence. Micek said even though the report was issued well before voting begins, for Corbett's re-election campaign, the report may hurt his chances in the polls.

A long-awaited review of the Jerry Sandusky child molestation case has exonerated Republican Gov. Tom Corbett of suggestions the investigation was slowed by political calculations. But state Attorney General Kathleen Kane says she still sees flaws in the prosecution and is openly inviting speculation on how it was handled.

A report released Monday detailing the handling of the Jerry Sandusky child molestation case faults police and prosecutors for long delays in bringing charges but found no evidence that politics affected the investigation.

The report, commissioned by Democratic Attorney General Kathleen Kane and written by former federal prosecutor Geoff Moulton, by a former federal prosecutor blamed a three-year time lapse in filing charges on communication problems, an expungement of a 1998 complaint about the former Penn State coach and a failure to take certain investigative steps early on.

A plethora of legislation was proposed in the aftermath of the Sandusky Penn State sex abuse case. One of the most comprehensive bills is expected to pass this week.

Senate Bill 21 will broaden the scope of mandated reporters when it comes to child abuse – and hold them more accountable.

Mandated reporters are those who have contact with children, anyone from a public library employee to clergy to a medical examiner. These reporters would be required to alert law enforcement when they suspect a child is being abused.

Proposals to change how suspected child abuse must be reported in Pennsylvania are nearing the finish line after stalling for several months.

Two measures are awaiting final votes in the House and Senate to clarify who must report child abuse and how they should do it. But a plan that originated in the state Senate would now exclude lawyers from the list of people who will be mandated reporters, after House lawmakers voiced concerns about breaching attorney-client privilege: should lawyers be mandated reporters if filing a complaint could violate the trust of their client?

A day after Penn State announced the selection of Eric Barron as its new president, members of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, or SNAP, are responding to his statement that patience is needed.

At an event announcing his appointment, Barron was asked what the proper role he sees for the legacy of former Nittany Lions coach Joe Paterno.

Kane Pressed on Timeline of Sandusky Case Review

Feb 12, 2014

State Attorney General Kathleen Kane is being pressed for answers on when she’ll wrap up an investigation of the prosecution of Jerry Sandusky, former Penn State assistant football coach and convicted child molester.

The internal review began a year ago when Kane hired an outside deputy attorney general, Geoff Moulton, to helm the investigation. Kane told the Senate Appropriations Committee Tuesday that releasing findings will take more time, since document recovery and scheduling interviews have slowed down the review.

Penn State’s Board of Trustees came under fire as a result of the Jerry Sandusky scandal two years ago.

Now, State Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne) introduced legislation Friday that would shrink the size of board from 30 voting members to 23.

Under the new bill, the board would be made up of 8 elected alumni, five gubernatorial appointees, five members from the agriculture industry and five members from the business industry. The legislation would also prohibit the Governor, Lieutenant Governor and all state row officers from being on the board.

Work still remains for state lawmakers on child protection legislation, in spite of the slew of bills signed by the governor last week.

The 10 proposals are the result of more than a year of work to tighten up the state’s child protection laws.

Central to the effort was a proposal to re-write the state’s legal definition of child abuse to make it less vague.

But Bucks County District Attorney Dave Heckler says there’s more to come.

Pennsylvania enacted its first new laws Wednesday in the Legislature's wide-ranging response to the Jerry Sandusky and Roman Catholic clergy child sexual abuse scandals, a step that expands the nearly 20-year-old playbook for how caseworkers and investigators can handle reports of child abuse.

Making Child Abuse Easier to Define in Pennsylvania

Dec 9, 2013
90.5 WESA

The Pennsylvania Senate could be voting on legislation this week to overhaul the state's child abuse laws.

Three Senate committees have advanced six bills, the most important of which would change the definition of what constitutes child abuse, making it tougher and bringing it into line with the standards used in many other states.

The new wording would include, “intentionally, knowingly or recklessly causing bodily injury to a child.” It also lists a number of acts that would constitute abuse, such as kicking, burning or forcefully shaking or striking a child less than one year old.

The Pennsylvania State University Board of Trustees would be decreased from 30 voting members to 23 under legislation unveiled by state Sens. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne County) and John Corman (R-Centre County).

Yudichak said, in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky scandal, the school is facing its greatest challenge.

Penn State officials say they are gratified by the NCAA's decision to gradually restore football scholarships taken from the school following the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal.

President Rodney Erickson called the news particularly welcome to student athletes who want to attend Penn State "and will now have the means to do so."

College sports' governing body said Tuesday that the school has made significant changes to its athletics programs and cited the recommendation of former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell, who's been serving as the programs' integrity monitor.

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