Jim Roddey

Mark Nootbaar / 90.5 WESA

The three men who have held the seat of Allegheny County Executive are throwing their support behind a proposal to allow municipalities in the county to disincorporate and turn over operations to county officials.

A study out of the Institute of Politics at the University of Pittsburgh outlines a path for municipalities in Allegheny County to disincorporate that begins with local elected officials approving a referendum on disincorporation. If the voters approve, it would then be sent to the county council to accept the plan. 

Mark Nootbar / 90.5 WESA

When the Allegheny County Home Rule Charter Commission was formed in 1997, the members decided it was time to move away from having three full-time commissioners running the county, and instead it was time to have a single full-time executive and a 15-member county council. 

“I think right now, we have a citizens council and I don’t want to make it a career thing, like a state legislature or Pittsburgh City Council,” said Allegheny County Council Member Charles Martoni who was also a member of the first council in 2000. “I think it works pretty well the way it is.”

John Heller / AP

 

The man who once served as Allegheny County's first elected executive is stepping down as chairman of the county Republican committee.

Eighty-three-year-old James Roddey announced his resignation at the party's Spirit of Lincoln Dinner on Monday night.

Roddey says the county party raised $1.3 million under his leadership and that the Pittsburgh-based county now has more Republicans than any other county in the state.

Two Area River Conservationist Non-Profits To Merge

Jun 22, 2015

Two area non-profits, Rivers of Steel Heritage Corporation and RiverQuest, will merge Sept. 1, officials announced Monday.

RiverQuest Board President Jim Roddey said last year the company would need to merge to continue operating its boat Explorer and other river-based science education programs. Officials said talks began shortly after.