John F Kennedy

Walt Cisco / Dallas Morning News

Fifty years after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Pittsburgh's Prime Stage Theatre is presenting The Kennedy Legacy, a program where audience members can relive the powerful speeches of President John F. Kennedy and share remembrances of that time period.

Prime Stage artistic director Wayne Brinda was 13 years old in 1963. And even though he was just a kid, Brinda remembers exactly where he was when he heard the president had been shot. 

CBS archives / Wikipedia

The assassination of President John F. Kennedy changed the lives of many, as well as the trajectory of world and media history. 

For professor Jeff Ritter, chair of the department of communication at La Roche College, TV coverage of the assassination set the stage for breaking news coverage in the future, and the trust Americans would have in veteran journalists such as Walter Cronkite.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. One of the events marking the occasion is a reading of the play “Noah’s Ark,” which was inspired by James Douglass’ book “JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters.”

Ryan Loew / 90.5 WESA

Cyril Wecht, world renowned forensic pathologist and former Allegheny County coroner, remembers exactly what he was doing when he heard the news that President John F. Kennedy had been shot.

“Ironically I was standing in an autopsy room looking at a gunshot victim, a victim of homicide,” says Wecht.