Juvenile Incarceration

Matt Rourke / AP

For decades in the 20th Century, the U.S. treated children differently than adults in the criminal court system -- experts at the time believed kids were inherently more capable of rehabilitation. 

A Qualitative Study of Youth and the Juvenile Justice System: A 100 Percent Pittsburgh Pilot Project / Pittsburgh Foundation

Youth need more of a say in shaping the juvenile justice system they're a part of, according to a report released Monday by the Pittsburgh Foundation.

Duquesne School of Law / Facebook

Starting in November, Duquesne University law students will travel to eight of Pittsburgh’s public housing complexes to help residents expunge juvenile convictions that put them at risk of eviction.  

In Pennsylvania, a person’s entire juvenile record becomes public if they are convicted of a felony as a minor – between the ages of 14 and 18. Duquesne School of Law assistant professor Tiffany Sizemore-Thompson said that is the most common reason a record becomes public. And once it’s open, every part of the record is public.

Keith Srakocic / AP

**UPDATED: This story was updated at 11:15 a.m., June 20, 2016 to reflect the new court date for Alex Hribal.  

The young man accused of wounding 20 fellow students and a security guard at a mass stabbing at Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville two years ago will either plead guilty or go to trial on August 1.

Courtesy of George Junior Republic

A Mercer County school for delinquent youths will cut costs this summer by eliminating its 40-year-old equestrian program to add other activities.

The equestrian program at George Junior Republic School in Grove City consists of 16 horses and a staff with an operating cost of more than $250,000 annually. 

“A delinquent youth spends an average of nine months at the school,” said the school’s CEO, Rick Losasso. “When you think about the actual utilization and the costs associated to it, that goes into our decision-making process.”

supremecourt.gov

Pennsylvania has more people sentenced to life in prison as juveniles than any other state.

A decision by the U.S. Supreme Court Monday could reduce those sentences for 497 inmates in Pennsylvania. Those people were convicted as juveniles for homicides; which used to mean automatic life in prison without parole.

In 2012, the Supreme Court ruled that was cruel and unusual punishment. Monday, the court said that ban is retroactive to cases decided before 2012.

Michael Chen / flickr

Our content partner PublicSource did a special investigation into medications purchased for youth offenders at the state's six juvenile corrections facilities over seven years. What did they find? A higher of rate antipsychotics being prescribed than for the state's foster children. We'll delve into it with PublicSource reporter Halle Stockton.  

Stories of Juvenile Incarceration Told Through 'Day Room Window'

Oct 15, 2014
Jenn Vargas / Flickr

Last year the Christian Science Monitor reported juvenile incarceration rates in the U.S. were at their lowest point in 38 years.

However, the sentencing of juveniles is still a challenge for the justice system. We’ll explore this issue with Jeff Shook, associate professor in the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work.

We’ll also speak with playwright Bonnie Cohen whose play "Day Room Window" is based on her experiences working in the juvenile justice system.