Layoffs

Jake Savitz / 90.5 WESA

Paint maker PPG says it will lay off about 1,100 people and take a pretax restructuring charge of between $80 million and $85 million in the second quarter.

At Greene County Coal Mine, Dwindling Production Means 370 Lost Jobs

Mar 8, 2018
Reid Frazier / StateImpact Pennsylvania

Austin Turner was headed back home to West Virginia on a recent afternoon from his job at the 4 West Mine in Mt. Morris, Pennsylvania. It was going to be one of his last shifts there, as the mine would be shutting down soon.

Jessica Spengler / flickr

Hearst Magazines plans to lay off 145 employees at the Pennsylvania publisher that owns Men's Health and Runner's World.

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

A sweeping school code bill will become a state law without Gov. Tom Wolf's signature. 

In addition to providing funding for public schools, the GOP-penned legislation suspends the traditional seniority rules that dictate furloughing teachers, opting instead to eliminate teachers based on who scores the worst on the state's teacher effectiveness rating.

Clarion University / Facebook

The acting president of state-owned Clarion University says the school no longer plans to notify faculty of layoffs at the end of this academic year.

Clarion was one of five of Pennsylvania's 14 state-owned universities that announced in March that layoffs and program cuts could occur in the 2018-19 school year, as the State System of Higher Education struggles generally with an enrollment drop.

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Administrators at five of Pennsylvania's 14 state-owned universities have given faculty notice that layoffs and program cuts could occur in the 2018-19 school year, as the State System of Higher Education struggles generally with an enrollment drop.

Mansfield University administrators filed a notice March 21. Faculty at California, Clarion, Edinboro and Cheyney universities have since been notified.

Mark Lennihan / AP

Hershey expects to cut its global workforce by about 15 percent, with the reductions coming mostly from hourly employees outside the United States.

The Pennsylvania chocolate maker also trimmed its forecast for long-term sales growth to between 2 percent and 4 percent, down from the previous 3 percent to 5 percent. The company attributed the lowered expectation to changes in U.S. shopping habits and macroeconomic challenges overseas.

CEO Michele Buck will discuss the measures in New York when she meets with analysts Wednesday.

David Amsler / Flickr

Republican state Sen. Scott Wagner is filing a Right-to-Know request over the layoffs of several hundred state employees.

The York County lawmaker is being blamed by Democratic Governor Tom Wolf and union leaders for being a major cause of the layoffs.

But Wagner contends that Wolf is at fault.

At the end of the 2016 legislative session last month, the GOP-led Senate decided not to vote on a funding bill for the state’s unemployment compensation program.

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

Layoff notices are going out to more than 500 Pennsylvania state employees because of a dispute over additional state funding for unemployment compensation services.

Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf's administration said roughly 520 employees will have received the notices by Tuesday.

The employees' last day on the job will be Dec. 19, when the Wolf administration plans to close unemployment compensation service centers in Allentown, Altoona and Lancaster.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review will produce its last print edition and become a free, digital-only publication, the paper’s parent company announced Wednesday.

Print operations will cease Nov. 30. The company's Pittsburgh newsroom will continue publication online from its North Shore offices led by senior editors Luis Fabregas, Jeremy Boren and Rob Amen.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 

Two top editors of the Tribune-Review in Pittsburgh have announced they are retiring, and a third tendered his resignation.

Trib Total Media officials said Monday that executive editor Frank Craig and managing editor Jim Cuddy are stepping down immediately. Deputy managing editor for sports Duke Maas is also leaving.

Craig, 62, became the Tribune-Review editor in 2000. He was previously an assistant managing editor at The Blade in Toledo, Ohio.

Pittsburgh-based law firm Reed Smith has cut 45 attorneys and an unspecified number of support staff employees.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports the cuts are part of a restructuring of the firm's offices in the United States, Europe and the Middle East.

The firm isn't saying where the layoffs have occurred.

The firm's Pittsburgh headquarters employs 250 of the 1,650 attorneys the firm employs worldwide.