Lisa Boscola

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  By a 26-20 vote, the State Senate has approved a measure that would amend the Cemetery and Funeral Merchandise Trust Fund Law in what proponents call an attempt to better protect consumers.

When someone is victimized in a crime, the court can order the offender to pay the victim restitution. But according to the Office of Pennsylvania Courts, many victims never receive that restitution.

“Only 12 percent of mandated restitution is dispersed to the victims, only 12 percent which is ridiculous because these people are owed their money. A lot of people just evade; they try to avoid their restitution and this is two more bills aimed at trying to collect it for victims,” said Senator Lisa Boscola (D-Northampton County).

Following last year’s passage of a bill allowing licensed volunteer fire companies and social organizations to sponsor small betting pools, one state lawmaker spoke on the Senate Floor this week and said groups are still being punished for that with Superbowl or March Madness pools.

When the temperatures dropped across North America this winter, many Pennsylvanian’s saw their electricity bill skyrocket because they had contracts with their electric supplier that allowed for variable rates. Now a state senator hopes her legislation will help to protect consumers from unexpected spikes in the future.

Sen. Lisa Boscola (D-Northampton County) introduced legislation Wednesday that would among other things shorten the time it takes to switch from one rate plan to another. 

State Sens. Rob Teplitz (D-Dauphin County) and Lisa Boscola (D- Northampton County) don’t believe every student should go to college after high school.

Instead, they said students should have more opportunities to be trained for technical jobs that don’t require a college degree.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projected more than 40 million job openings will be filled by workers who do not have a bachelor’s degree by 2014.

Boscola said students need to know that there are practical applications and a lot of job opportunities for technical careers.

If you win your basketball bracket pool at work, you might need that money to pay a fine — because it's illegal.

It might not be "madness," but a state lawmaker says it is "ridiculous" that filling out brackets for the NCAA basketball tournament in an office pool is still against the law in Pennsylvania.