The century-old Kaufmann’s building closed at the end of this summer, but fortunately, many of its most iconic artifacts will be preserved. Those who remember the Kaufmann building will be able to enjoy its most famous features at a different location.

What Does Macy's Closure Mean For Downtown Retail?

Jul 14, 2015
jpellgen / flickr

  Macy’s announced the closure of their downtown Pittsburgh store yesterday, surprising many residents and setting the stage for a discussion on the future of large brick-and-mortar retailers in the city.  Before yesterday’s announcement, Macy’s, which had once been home to Kaufmann’s department store, had already been gradually cutting back their selling space.  The Pittsburgh Business Times has covered the story and explored what a closure might mean for downtown retail.  Reporter Tim Schooley shares his thoughts on today’s show.

David Brossard / Flickr

  After 128 years, the Kaufmann clock still tolls, but in the coming months visitors meeting under it won’t be in front of a department store.

Macy’s, a Cincinnati-based department store chain, announced Monday the closing of the 13-floor Downtown Pittsburgh store at 400 Fifth Avenue. The building was sold earlier this year to Philadelphia-based Core Realty, which touts mixed-use redevelopment for the space.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

After a century in downtown Pittsburgh, residents of the city can still recall telling friends and family to “meet me under the Kaufmann’s Clock.” The bronze ornamental clock, which still hangs at the corner of Smithfield Street and Fifth Avenue, has served as a meeting place for Pittsburghers for years. Macy's celebrates the clock's 100th anniversary with a city proclamation of May 17th as "Meet Me Under the Clock Day" as well as events surrounding this cherished Kaufmann's tradition.