Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

Courtesy of Angela Carducci

Craig Toocheck has a vision for Pittsburgh's future events and meetings. 

USPS / via AP

It's a beautiful day to honor Mister Rogers with a postage stamp.

The U.S. Postal Service is releasing a stamp featuring Fred Rogers, the gentle TV host who entertained and educated generations of preschoolers on "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood."

The "forever" stamp goes on sale Friday. It pictures Rogers in his trademark cardigan along with King Friday, a puppet character from the show's Neighborhood of Make-Believe.

Screenshot / Twitch.TV

It takes around 414 hours to watch all 886 episodes of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, and thousands of people around the world are embracing the continuous stream of programming.

Adelina Lancianese / 90.5 WESA

Mayor Bill Peduto exclaimed in jest, "Hello, scary puppets!" as he met puppeteers costumed as tropical birds, glittery penguins and even a massive effigy of Peduto himself in the City-County Building.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

When Philadelphian Cyndie Carioli was a new mother in the 1970s, she was like most first time parents: nervous. 

Updated at 4:52 p.m. ET

Senate leaders reached a bipartisan budget agreement to increase military and domestic spending levels for two years, paving the way for the first long-term spending pact since President Trump took office.

The White House and House Speaker Paul Ryan quickly declared support for the pact, helping pave the way for its passage by the end of the week, despite opposition from fiscal hawks and liberal Democrats.

The U.S. Postal Service has announced that it will release a Forever Stamp featuring America's favorite neighbor, television icon Mister Rogers.

The title character of the half-hour children's educational television series Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, Fred Rogers "was known as a beloved television neighbor to generations of children," a statement from USPS said. The stamp is scheduled to be unveiled March 23, 50 years after the original episode of the series aired in the U.S. in 1968.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

A Focus Features documentary dubbed “Won’t You Be My Neighbor” about the life and work of Fred Rogers is coming to the the big screen in June, officials announced Monday.

According to a release, the film will examine how Rogers navigated cultural and social issues in a forward-thinking way.

President and CEO of the Fred Rogers Company Paul Siefken said Rogers was a fascinating man on and off screen.

Gene J. Puskar / AP

The images of people helping one another in the wake of the deadly bombing of an Ariana Grande concert in England has prompted one writer to pay tribute to public television's "Mister Rogers" for the upcoming 50th anniversary of the iconic children's show.

Deanna Garcia / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh is often called a city of neighborhoods. Two of the most famous, perhaps, are Mister Rogers' Neighborhood and the Neighborhood of Make-Believe. Fred Rogers was born on March 20, 87 years ago. Some of his show’s largest and best-known sets are thrilling visitors to the Heinz History Center — as Mister Rogers’ legacy goes on.

Rachellynn Schoen / Heinz History Center

One of Pittsburgh, and America’s, most iconic figures, Mister Rogers, had one of the longest-running children’s programs on television. Now, for the first time, the sets and props from the show will be on display to the public.

On the fourth floor of the John Heinz History Center is the special collections gallery, which is organized by neighborhood: there is an Irish neighborhood, an African American neighborhood and a "Neighborhood of Make-Believe."

Pittsburgh’s most iconic — and speediest — deliveryman, Mr. McFeely, helped kick off the 14th annual Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood Sweater Drive Thursday.

McFeely, played by David Newell, brought his puppet friends, Don Quixote, King Friday and Daniel Striped Tiger, to teach the 72 students from Crescent Early Childhood Centers and the Children’s Museum Pre-K Headstart Programs the value of sharing by donating sweaters.

Pittsburgh Children's Museum

Your friendly neighbors at the Pittsburgh Children's Museum will waive admission fees on Wednesday, March 20 — just tell 'em Mister Rogers sent you.