National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/cdcglobal/8271756665/">CDC Global</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>

In remote areas of the world, traditional lab testing for malaria can be difficult. That’s where the malaria rapid diagnostic test comes in.

Tim Davenport/Wildlife Conservation Society

The growth of data publicly available on the internet has been a boon for biological science and conservation. But it is also being used by poachers and dishonest collectors to locate rare plants and animals and sell them illegally for a hefty price.

This situation presents researchers and the public with a quandary: How to find a middle ground that preserves the spirit of scientific discovery while protecting at-risk species.

From Hollywood to here: ‘Rememory’ and the future of memory

Oct 14, 2017
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/neilconway/3792906411/">Neil Conway</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>. Image cropped.

In the recent film “Rememory,” an inventor has built a device that can extract memories from the brain. There’s more to the story — a murder, for one, and an amateur sleuth played by Peter Dinklage — but let’s pause here. How close are we in real life to being able to record our memories, Hollywood-style?

Writing The Fantastic In 2017

Oct 14, 2017

To The Moon, And…Beyond?

Oct 14, 2017

Jane Goodall And Her Life In The Wild

Oct 14, 2017

The cost of being a DACA recipient

Oct 13, 2017

This week President Donald Trump sent Congress a sweeping list of immigration demands, including the building of a border wall in exchange for an extension of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. DACA, as it is known, was created to shield immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children from deportation. And it gives them work permits. But to be one of the 800,000 current DACA recipients, you've got to pay up, $495 to be exact. Marketplace Weekend spoke to Doris Meissner, senior fellow and director of the U.S.

Trump delivers another blow to Obamacare

Oct 13, 2017

And this one lands directly on the insurance industry, for now. The president cut payments to insurers that go toward subsidies for low-income people who buy policies on the health care exchanges. Those so-called cost-sharing reductions were worth billions to the insurance industry. So what will it do now? 

To sell his tax plan, President Donald Trump is trying to send a message to ordinary Americans: that cutting corporate taxes will benefit them too. During a speech this week in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in front of a crowd of truckers, he claimed that by allowing companies to bring back overseas money at a low tax rate, the typical American household will benefit by getting a "pay raise" of about $4000.  What’s behind the claim – and is it likely? 

To hear the full story, click on the audio player above.

Trump won't certify Iran deal

Oct 13, 2017

President Donald Trump announced today he won't certify Iran's compliance with the 2015 nuclear agreement. The decision had been flagged in advance by administration officials. The next move is up to Congress. It has 60 days to decide whether or not to reimpose sanctions on Iran that were lifted by the 2015 deal. Any decision to reimpose the sanctions wouldn't go down well with our allies across the Atlantic.

Do nondisclosure agreements protect sexual abusers?

Oct 13, 2017

Hollywood is struggling to come to terms with the Harvey Weinstein scandal. More women have come forward with more allegations and named other big names. But it’s not just entertainment where payoffs happen to keep people quiet. What role do nondisclosure agreements play in shielding sexual abusers?

Almost two years ago, The Takeaway brought listeners the story of Alex Diaz, a high school dropout, former gang member and convicted felon who had his sights firmly fixed on going to college. Diaz told us that merely starting out on the pathway towards college was a struggle because of his troubled past, which required him to challenge others' low expectations.

Schools have become the latest target of cyberattacks

Oct 13, 2017

An entire school district in Flathead Valley, Montana, shut down for days after hackers targeted several schools, sending death threats to students and staff, and threatening to release sensitive personal information unless a ransom was paid in the online currency bitcoin. More than 30 schools and a community college closed for three days, affecting over 17,500 students.

For Superintendent Steve Bradshaw, it all started with a text message from an unknown number.

What happens when the economic census is late

Oct 13, 2017

What you don't know can indeed hurt you, economically. Every five years, the government surveys businesses in what's called the Economic Census of the United States. That census should be happening right now but it's not, due to a few different reasons. Danny Vinik, the assistant editor at Politico's "The Agenda," has the story on this — and it's appropriately titled "Is Washington bungling the Census?"

10/13/17: Time is running out for Congress

Oct 13, 2017

We wrap up the news week wondering: Will Congress be able to pass any big legislation in 2017? What will happen to low-income people seeking health care once government subsidies disappear? Will President Donald Trump and European leaders decide to impose new sanctions on Iran? Plus, corporate America's reliance on nondisclosure agreements helps serial harassers stay under the radar and aren't necessarily protecting public interest, so why do we still have them? And, on a more personal note, it would make it a lot harder for us to do our jobs if we didn't have accurate economic data.

Will Congress pass any big legislation in 2017?

Oct 13, 2017

Rachel Abrams of The New York Times and Fortune's Leigh Gallagher join Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal to discuss this week's business and economic news. President Donald Trump has been making a lot of bombastic statements asking Congress to pass legislation, but so far, it hasn't been able to deliver. It's not looking good for Congress to pass tax reform or any other major legislation by the end of the year, which could dramatically impact midterm election results. And despite Trump's promises for economic growth, the IMF forecasts the U.S.

Why it's so hard to qualify as a dog walker

Oct 13, 2017

Laine Higgins wanted to earn some extra cash. So she applied for a job as a dog walker in New York City with one of the many on-demand dog-walking services. And was denied. "I got one question wrong on the safety test, and I think what did me in was all of the questions they have about harnesses. So to their credit, they're very thorough." Higgins isn't alone.

2017 Reveal Generic Promos

Oct 12, 2017

:30 and :15 generic promos for Reveal, with host Al Letson. :30 promo includes :06 outcue tail :15 promo includes :03 outcue tail

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos wants states to decide how federal education dollars are spent. This week, Reveal examines how states might spend that money and what the change could mean for the nation’s students. Plus, we’ll look at how special ed students in Texas were denied the education they are guaranteed under federal civil rights law.

For a decade, journalist Paula Froelich was the deputy editor of the New York Post’s celebrity and gossip section, Page Six. Like many others who have traveled in Hollywood circles, she has a story about the now-infamous media mogul, Harvey Weinstein.

Her story begins in the year 2000, when Froelich attended a party — a party where Weinstein was also a guest.

Mike Blake/Reuters

Deadly wildfires are ripping across Northern California, scorching more than 115,000 acres across eight counties. At least 13 people have been confirmed dead.

Multiple fires are now burning across the region’s wine country, which includes Sonoma, Napa and Mendocino counties. The blazes have forced tens of thousands of people to evacuate and destroyed 1,500 structures, including mobile home parks, houses and wineries.

While President Donald Trump has dismissed climate change as a hoax, the Department of Defense is focused on understanding and preparing for continued climate disruption and the security threats it poses in a warming world.

When Hurricane Irma hit Florida, it blasted an estimated 3 to 10 feet of storm surge into the Everglades. Combined with the drenching rain, the storm may change the vegetation patterns of the enormous wetland and perhaps prod the people of South Florida to rethink how it lives with its water.

The hurricanes that recently smashed islands in the Caribbean set records for size, strength and endurance — records that experts predict will be broken sooner rather than later, as global warming continues to heat the oceans and intensify precipitation cycles.

Dessima Williams, former Grenada UN ambassador, says the Caribbean people remain resilient and self-reliant, but they have limited financial capacity to recover and rebuild.

At Climate Week 2017, a mix of optimism and urgency

Oct 7, 2017

When the world’s leaders gathered in New York for the annual fall meeting of the UN General Assembly, another series of meetings took place, called Climate Week NYC, where government, business and NGO leaders discussed global climate solutions. 

The mood at Climate Week this year was “a strange confluence of optimism and urgency,” says Alden Meyer, a climate diplomacy expert with the Union of Concerned Scientists, who came to New York City for the meetings.

Desperate to reduce crowding in jails and prisons, court systems all over the country are trying diversion – alternatives to putting offenders behind bars. On this week's Reveal, we peek behind diversion’s good intentions and uneven results.

Moira Brown/The New England Aquarium, Wikimedia Commons

The discovery of 13 right whale carcasses, most of them in Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence, is causing alarm among scientists.

Only about 500 right whales remain in the North Atlantic, so 13 deaths represent more than 2 percent of the population. Seeing 10 of those deaths in the Gulf of St Lawrence, an area far north of the whale’s usual summer range in the Gulf of Maine, is “completely unprecedented,” according to Erin Meyer-Gutbrod, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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