National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

02/19/18: Life after a mass shooting

13 hours ago

A couple of weeks ago on this show, we told you about some of the funding and resources available for mass shooting victims to help with their short-term recovery. Today, we consider what life and work is like five, or even ten years after surviving a high-profile shooting. Two survivors of a mass shooting describe long term recovery. Also on today's show, we continue with our project called "Divided Decade," as we hear stories of how people's lives changed since the financial crisis ten years ago.

A comic book hero offers a fresh vision of Africa

14 hours ago

Marvel Comics' blockbuster "Black Panther" has stirred up all sorts of debate.

Hana Baba and Leila Day, hosts of the podcast The Stoop, checked it out this weekend. They tell The World's Marco Werman they were pleasantly surprised, even though they were more than a little worried going in. 

It’s a mystery fit for a Cold War-era spy novel. In late 2016, officials with the US embassy in Havana started hearing strange noises that seemed to be directed right at their homes or hotel rooms.

Most called it a high-pitched sound. Some said it sounded like grinding metal, while others compared it to a kind of hum. Many said they felt pressure changes too, like the feeling of driving down a highway with only one car window open.

(Markets Edition) The U.S. Commerce Department has outlined a series of steep tariffs on steel and aluminum from some foreign countries, and China is not happy. We'll look at why the Trump administration is pushing for these tariffs and how China might retaliate if they go into effect. Plus: With the markets' wild swings a couple weeks ago, we look at the attitudes young investors have toward stocks. 

Even dogs need to have experience to get a job

22 hours ago

After a year and a half of basic coursework, six months of professional training, and a final exam, Patch — a Labrador-golden retriever mix — was ready to become an assistance dog for Annette Ramirez.

Ramirez, a 53-year-old resident from Manhattan Beach, California, is a quadruple amputee who lost her limbs due to a medical mishap that occurred when she was undergoing a hysterectomy back in 2012.

Seawater is infiltrating the Runit Dome, an atomic bomb-waste repository on a remote Marshall Island atoll in the central Pacific Ocean, posing a potential risk of radiation exposure for the small, local population. 

The economics of presidential libraries

Feb 19, 2018

There’s more to Presidents Day than furniture and mattress sales. It’s a day when we recall the men who’ve held the country’s highest office. Thirteen presidents have libraries to jog the collective memory. We look at the economics of two presidential libraries.

Click the audio player above for the full story.

New tax law includes incentives for poor areas

Feb 19, 2018

A line item in the tax law creates a new Opportunity Zone program, with incentives to draw business to underdeveloped places. This strategy has been tried by former administrations, and state and local governments, with results that have often been disappointing.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

02/19/2018: Opportunities in the new tax law

Feb 19, 2018

(U.S. Edition) There's a section in the new tax law that aims to help chronically poor, underdeveloped areas in the U.S. The law creates an Opportunity Zones program, which gives incentives to draw businesses to these regions. But do they actually work? We'll dive into that question on today's show. Afterwards, we'll look at the group that President Trump's 2019 budget would most likely impact — if it were to go into effect. Plus: We discuss the economics of two presidential libraries: Ronald Reagan's in California and Herbert Hoover's in Iowa.

Tim Armstrong: People need to vote on net neutrality

Feb 19, 2018

Less than a year ago, Yahoo and AOL officially merged after AOL’s parent company, Verizon, bought Yahoo for more than $4 billion. Since then, former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer has moved on to an unannounced venture. AOL CEO Tim Armstrong has had the job of blending the two companies into a digital content behemoth named Oath, vying to challenge Facebook and Google for advertising revenue. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Armstrong about how Oath fits in the digital media landscape at the Makers conference in Los Angeles earlier this month.

The Source Code: Tim Armstrong

Feb 19, 2018

Tim Armstrong worked at Google for years, then as the head of AOL. Now he's the CEO of Oath, the company that was created when Verizon bought Yahoo, and Yahoo and AOL merged. In this long cut of the interview, Armstrong talks about the future of digital content, as well as the awkwardness of sponsoring a women’s leadership conference that doesn’t have former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer at it.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … There are calls for the boss of Latvia’s central bank to step down after he was detained over the weekend by the nation’s anti-corruption agency while his home and offices were raided. We’ll explain what’s next for the country’s banking system. Then, new details as a $1.7 billion fraud at India’s Punjab National Bank continues to unravel after the story came to light late last week. Afterwards, how De Beers is using blockchain technology to help make diamonds conflict free.

Less than a year ago, Yahoo and AOL officially merged after AOL’s parent company, Verizon, bought Yahoo for more than $4 billion. Since then, former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer has moved on to an unannounced venture. AOL CEO Tim Armstrong has had the job of blending the two companies into a digital content behemoth named Oath, vying to challenge Facebook and Google for advertising revenue. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Armstrong about how Oath fits in the digital media landscape at the Makers conference in Los Angeles. The early February conference was sponsored in part by Oath.

In early November, Strava — a technology company that can track athletic activity for its users through its website and app — released an article on Medium that proudly announced its first major global “heat map” that the company had released since 2015.

The article contains a list of astounding numbers including a billion activities, three trillion latitude/longitude points, 13 trillion rasterized pixels, 10 terabytes of raw input data and 17 billion miles covered.

Humanity is now facing an ever-increasing threat of unpredictable and extreme weather, climate scientists warn.

While global warming is creating more powerful storms and record-breaking, drought-driven wildfires, it would be a mistake to view these events as the “new normal,” they say. The planet has not reached a new climate stability, so the years ahead could be quite a lot worse.

For years, China has been associated with dirty, smog-filled air — so much so that it has become custom for some hotels to give guests complementary masks. Recently, though, the country has started making large strides to clear the air.

National Geographic, the National Audubon Society and other conservation groups have declared 2018 the Year of The Bird to celebrate the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

To help kick off the celebration, novelist and National Geographic writer Jonathan Franzen wrote a cover story, Why Birds Matter, for the magazine’s January issue. Franzen says a walk in New York City’s Central Park opened his eyes to the pleasures of birdwatching.

No immigration bill as feds ink contract to monitor license plates

Feb 16, 2018

It was a busy week for immigration issues in Washington, DC — but it was also a busy week for immigration agents across the country who are stepping up arrests and finding new ways to track people.

This was supposed to be infrastructure week, remember? It turned out a little bit differently. Catherine Rampell of the Washington Post and Nela Richardson of Redfin joined us to talk about it. With the recent jobs report stirring fears of inflation, are we worrying too much about rising prices in the economy? Then: We're going to be borrowing a lot of money in this economy over the next eight to 10 years, yet White House advisers, including Council of Economic Advisers chair Kevin Hassett have basically said, "Deficits? Meh." We'll explain the fiscal flip-flop in the Republican Party.

What TV can teach the movie business about diversity

Feb 16, 2018

Tanya Saracho is the creator and showrunner of the Starz original scripted drama “Vida,” which centers around two Mexican-American sisters who return to east Los Angeles after their mother dies. While preparing to put the final touches to an episode with her editor, Saracho reflected on how all this was made possible, thanks to a meeting with Marta Fernandez, the senior vice president of Original Programming at the Starz network. “To have an executive who was Hispanic was amazing, ‘cause you don’t go into these meetings and see, you know, people like you,” she said.

Cherokee playwright Mary Kathryn Nagle is fighting for the rights of Native Americans both onstage and off. 

That emoji you just tweeted could determine the next ad you see

Feb 16, 2018

What do egglplant, fire and the number 100 all have in common? They're all emojis that have twisted and evolved in meaning.

As those little digital images change how we communicate, they've also transformed how advertisers track our interests.

Since 2016, Twitter has sold data of people’s emoji use to advertisers, allowing companies to send people specific ads based on the emojis they tweet.

What can AI learn from non-Western philosophies?

Feb 16, 2018

As autonomous and intelligent systems become more and more ubiquitous and sophisticated, developers and users face an important question: How do we ensure that when these technologies are in a position to make a decision, they make the right decision — the ethically right decision?

It's a complicated question. And there’s not one single right answer. 

But there is one thing that people who work in the budding field of AI ethics seem to agree on.

Yoon Ji-young lays down slabs of fatty pork belly that sizzle and crackle as they touch the burning hot grill atop her kitchen table. Four months into her first pregnancy, the 35-year-old says she’s been caught off guard by the “weird” desires she’s had for meaty dishes that she typically avoids.

“I’ve had strong cravings for junk food, like hamburgers and fried chicken,” she says. “I don’t even like fried chicken at all!” 

How Chinese media covers US gun violence

Feb 16, 2018

Chinese state media often hypes American problems and foibles to redirect attention away from China’s poor human rights records. And yet, when it comes to American gun violence, it takes a measured tone.

Do corporate wellness programs work?

Feb 16, 2018

Robert Granger stands on a thick, blue, padded mat and stares up a rock-climbing wall covered in rainbow-colored, hand-and-foot holds. It looks like like someone threw a handful of skittles at the wall and they stuck.

“It’s a really good place to unwind and think about something else,” he said, during breaks between ascents. “The nice thing is you have to use your mind, as well as body, doing this. It takes your mind off anything else.” 

What does the gender wage gap sound like?

Feb 16, 2018

The U.S. lags behind Iceland, Rwanda and Nicaragua when it comes to pay equity for women. That's according to a recent report from the World Economic Forum. In the U.S., on average, women earn 80 cents for every dollar men make, according to the Department of Labor. Why? There are more men work in higher-earning professions. But sometimes men just get paid more. When women find out a male colleague is making more money for the exact same job, it can spur them to action.

02/16/2018: Money, ethics and emojis

Feb 16, 2018

This week: A story about the financial holdings of the Trump administration, our national ethics laws and whether these things matter. Plus, what the gender wage gap sounds like, a chat with the designer of Michelle Obama’s portrait dress and a story about how advertisers track every emoji we use. Also, why we should all care about the country’s debt. 

This week, former First Lady Michelle Obama's official portrait was unveiled to much oohing and ahing at the National Portrait Gallery.

"I'm also thinking about all of the young people, particularly girls and girls of color, who in years ahead will come to this place, and they will look up, and they will see an image of someone who looks like them hanging on the wall of this great American institution," Obama said at the presentation.

Things turned out a little differently though. That's how we'll start today's episode, reflecting on the week in deficits, inflation and immigration. Then we examine the growing trend of online retailers expanding to brick-and-mortar stores. Amazon's doing it, and now Warby Parker announced plans to bring its number of stores to about 100 by the end of the year. Plus, what you need to know about esports.

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