National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/myfwcmedia/6871113503/">Tim Donovan/FWC</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/">CC BY-ND 2.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)

It's been seven years this month since a drilling rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico (April 20, 2010), releasing millions of barrels of oil into the ocean from its damaged wellhead. It’s thought to be the worst offshore oil spill in US history; even months later, hot oil continued to gush from the well, while oil-covered birds and tar balls washed up on beaches. 

04/24/17: AAA wants in on the ride-sharing game

10 hours ago

Stock prices are surging in Europe following the first round of election results in France. We'll take a look at why exactly investors are excited about the possible winner. Afterwards, we'll chat with Larry Rosin, the president of Edison Research, about the latest results from our Marketplace-Edison Research Poll. One major source of anxiety for Americans? Having proper health care coverage. And finally, we'll talk about AAA's attempt to lure younger members by wheeling out a new ride-sharing company called "Gig."

Staid AAA hopes to get a lift from car-sharing

12 hours ago

You know AAA as the big truck that comes to help when your car breaks down on the highway. But the auto club was an original mobility disrupter, one of the first car-service companies back when people were trading in their horses for a Model T. Now it’s the latest entrant to the car-sharing market. AAA’s “Gig” is rolling out in San Francisco as a bid to lure younger members.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

For some time we’ve heard that American manufacturing is in long-term decline — and that’s true, at least in terms of how many people it employs and how much of what we consume is made here. But manufacturing has rebounded since the recession, and there are lots of lean, mean, technology-driven manufacturers thriving all over country. Yet employers increasingly complain they can’t find enough skilled workers to meet current demand and grow. A new report says the industry could help itself a huge amount by doing one thing: hiring more women.

The word 'Trump' may be shifting our ideological attitudes

16 hours ago
David Brancaccio

Since late 2015, we’ve been tracking Americans' economic anxiety levels through the Marketplace-Edison Research Poll.

Just before Election Day last fall, our poll showed that we were experiencing increased levels of economic anxiety. But how is the country feeling now? Larry Rosin, president of Edison Research, joined us to talk about which results were surprising, how people perceive President Trump's tweets, and what Americans value most in a job. Below is an edited transcript.

Kai Ryssdal

He likes to say he inherited a mess, but, economically at least, President Trump was dealt a pretty good hand when he was inaugurated. 

The American economy’s been adding jobs for the past 78 months — six and a half years — as just one big indicator. And while the overall macro-economic numbers aren’t going gangbusters, they’re generally solid and consumer confidence is strong.

But.

There’s a disconnect.

04/24/2017: How is America's economic anxiety?

17 hours ago
Marketplace

There's been a big shake-up in Europe. Two outsiders have taken the lead in France's presidential election: Centrist Emmanuel Macron and the far-right nationalist Marine Le Pen. We'll look at how the news has affected global markets, and what France's election could mean for them in the coming weeks. And in news across the pond, we'll examine the latest results from our Marketplace-Edison Research Poll, which finds that nearly three-quarters of Americans — regardless of party — feel the government in Washington has forgotten them.

04/24/2017: Our fascination with dystopian futures

17 hours ago
Marketplace

Science fiction novels are getting the Hollywood treatment. Margaret Atwood's "The Handmaid's Tale" is coming to Netflix, while Dave Eggers' "The Circle" will hit the big screen later this week. Amy Webb, futurist and head of the Future Today Institute, explains why we seem to be so into dystopian fiction right now. Afterwards, we'll look at the meaning behind the word "hacktivism," and get a brief history of the term from Chester Wisniewski, a cybersecurity researcher for Sophos. 

Will El Niño return in 2017?

Apr 23, 2017
NASA

Just months after a powerful El Niño ended its 2015-2016 rampage through global weather systems, meteorologists see indications of another one forming in 2017.

El Niño began affecting the world’s weather in 2015 and ended barely a year ago. Typically, El Niños occur three to seven years apart, but dramatic winter flooding in California followed by unprecedented rains that buried Peru in deadly mudslides may be a signal that El Niño is returning.

How to hunt for extraterrestrial intelligence

Apr 23, 2017
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/jiuguangw/8129557462/">Jiuguang Wang</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)

The search for extraterrestrial intelligence — known as SETI — got a boost in 2015, when philanthropist Yuri Milner announced plans to inject up to $100 million into the field over the next decade.

It was a rainy day in Washington, DC — but that didn’t stop thousands from gathering on the National Mall to voice their support for science.

The March for Science in Washington was one of nearly 500 marches around the world scheduled on April 22, 2017—Earth Day. Science Friday‘s Danielle Dana, Otherhood's Catherine Whelan and Lauren Owens Lambert from the GroundTruth Project were all on the ground to get a sense of what it was like.

Here are a few of their photos:

Studying splashes to learn more about how disease spreads

Apr 22, 2017

Lydia Bourouiba, an applied mathematician at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, studies sneezes at a level of detail most of us have never imagined — under bright lights, using advanced imaging technology.

“When you zoom in, parts of the clouds look like snowflakes,” she explains in Science Friday’s new video, “Breakthrough: Connecting the Drops.”

“It’s really beautiful.”

Tick season has begun. How much do you know about Lyme disease?

Apr 22, 2017
James Gathany/CDC

Spring is here, so here’s a quick test: How much do you know about Lyme disease, that tick-borne scourge?

Transmitted in the United States by tiny blacklegged ticks, Lyme can initially cause fatigue and flulike symptoms — and later on, even arthritis or short-term memory loss. But if you think that Lyme always arrives with a bull's-eye rash, read on.

“Actually, the majority of the skin lesions are uniformly round and red,” says John Aucott, director of the Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Bringing Rigor Back To Health Research

Apr 22, 2017
Kai Ryssdal

Rachel Abrams of the New York Times and David Gura of Bloomberg join us to discuss the week's business and economic news. This week, they talk about whether the Trump administration can meet any of its major pledges before its first 100 days. Also, Trump has signed a lot of executive orders, but are they doing anything?

Courtesy of Sona Hosseini

This is a story about what happens when you finally get to touch the light you’ve longed for your whole life.

Sona Hosseini passes through the doors of Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. She exits the stairwell, and stands beside a dome that holds one of the observatory’s telescopes.

“It feels like home,” she says. And not just here — she’s at home anywhere associated with outer space.

“It’s been a long friendship between me and astronomy,” Hosseini admits.

Arthur Nazaryan/PRI

It was just two years ago that Liban Adam found himself in the shrublands in northern Somalia, crouched over a giant bowl of camel’s milk. The camel herder who gave it to him watched from behind, amused, as the 24-year-old timidly tasted the sour drink for the first time.

These are sleepless nights and worry-filled days for many undocumented immigrants brought to the US as children.

"Every single day, when I leave my home I pray to God that I'm going to come back home to see my mother," says Martha Zavala Perez, an immigrant with DACA status living in Oxnard, California. DACA is short for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a 2012 Obama administration executive order that offered temporary protection and work permits to immigrants who arrived in the US as children.

Steve Ballmer says numbers and facts still matter

Apr 21, 2017
Kai Ryssdal

President Trump said today his tax reform plan will be ready on Wednesday. While we're waiting, how about getting an idea of where exactly all those trillions of tax dollars are going? 

How to ace a job interview? We asked a manager

Apr 21, 2017
Lizzie O'Leary and Hayley Hershman

Want to work? Chances are you'll need to interview. Trying to charm a potential employer isn't everyone's idea of fun, but Yale professor Jason Dana questions whether job interviews are useful at all.

Some of you reached out to Marketplace Weekend with your thoughts:

Trump's first 100 days: 3 mayors weigh in

Apr 21, 2017
Lizzie O'Leary and Eliza Mills

April 29 marks President Trump's first 100 days in office. His tenure so far has been marked by executive orders on immigration, efforts to repeal Obamacare and a pledge to "hire American," among many other things. So, how's Trump doing? 

During election season, we spoke to three mayors from very different cities across the country, and after Trump took office, we visited each of them: Dennis Mock in Dalton, Georgia; Louise Carter-King in Gillette, Wyoming; and Biff Traber in Corvallis, Oregon. 

Ben Bergman

TV and movie writers are worried about the future as their payments go down while the studios' profits go up. Their union, the Writers Guild of America, is in the process of negotiating their new contract; their current contract expires May 1. The Guild is asking members to give authorization for a potential strike. Here’s some background on the situation:

It seems like there are more TV shows than ever. Why are writers unhappy?

Paradoxically, as the number of shows has increased, writers say their earnings have decreased 23 percent in the last two years. 

Dairy woes rattle U.S.-Canada relationship

Apr 21, 2017

President Trump is criticizing Canada over its recent pricing changes for dairy products that make some U.S. imports less competitive. The Trump administration said that's hurting dairy farmers in states like Wisconsin and New York. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Sam Beard

“We reject the global village, we reject this world without borders. We reject the big banks and the power of money that have subjugated France. We don’t want France to disappear.” Those are the words of David Berton, a 25-year-old student lawyer and an activist with the youth wing of the far-right National Front party. 

More young people support the National Front than any other party, and one of the main reasons is the appeal of the Front’s anti-globalization and protectionist policies, said author Alexandre Devecchio.

Corporate inversion rules go back on the table

Apr 21, 2017

President Trump signed an order directing a review of all tax regulations that might unduly burden U.S. corporations. That could lead to a rollback of an Obama order that sought to limit corporate inversions — when a U.S. company moves its corporate address to a foreign country to pay lower taxes. A rollback would line up with Republican party wishes, but would fly in the face of putting America first.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Musician Tei Shi takes the Marketplace Quiz

Apr 21, 2017
Hayley Hershman

No matter who you are, you've probably had a rough day at the office that changed your perspective, or maybe you made an impulse purchase you really, really wish you could take back. This week, musician Tei Shi took our money-inspired personality questionnaire. Her latest album, "Crawl Space," is out now.

Below is an edited transcript of the conversation.

In a next life, what would your career be?

04/21/2017: Facts still matter

Apr 21, 2017
Kai Ryssdal

President Trump said today his tax reform plan is gonna be ready on Wednesday. While we're waiting, it's worth talking about where exactly our tax dollars are going. A new website called USAFacts is trying to help folks get their hands on all that data. Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is behind it, and he came on to chat. Plus: The Trump administration is taking on inversions and Canadian dairy trade rules while France takes on globalization. And, as always, we recap the week in economic news in about five minutes or less.

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