National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

Joe Riis

Only a few dozen grizzly bears with bright yellow coats live in the forbidding Gobi Desert in Mongolia. In a new book, wildlife biologist Doug Chadwick writes about how these unique animals survive and what can be done to better protect them.

Chadwick first found out about the Gobi grizzly (called the mazaalai in Mongolian) almost by accident. He was tracking snow leopards in the mountains of Mongolia, near the border between Russia and Kazakhstan.

It’s rare for “creating art” and “paying the bills” to mean the same thing, so lots of artists lead double lives. The writer Kurt Vonnegut owned a car dealership (until it folded). Composer Philip Glass drove a taxi in New York City.

Comedian Courtney Maginnis has a day job, too — and it’s as unusual as her stand-up routine. She designs lingerie.

Gen Fujitani

When President Donald Trump signed an executive order on immigration last month banning people from seven countries from entering the United States, some of the loudest opponents were Japanese Americans. They have long memories of another executive order, No. 9066, that forced all Japanese Americans on the West Coast from their homes and businesses during World War II.

Some of the oxygen on the moon used to be on planet Earth

Feb 18, 2017
NASA/Reid Wiseman

Scientists say that every month, we here on Earth send some oxygen to the moon — and we’ve probably been doing it for billions of years.

The moon may be airless, but we know it has oxygen — Apollo mission samples confirmed its presence in the moon’s soil. The easiest explanation for its source is the solar wind, which bombards the moon’s surface with particles streaming off of the sun. But new research shows that the moon may be getting some of its oxygen from a more familiar place: Earth.

<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Spoleto_Opening_2013.JPG">ProfReader (own work)</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en">CC BY-SA 3.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)

Just before President Donald Trump took office in January, the Washington, DC publication The Hill reported that the new administration was drawing up sweeping plans to cut government spending. One target? The National Endowment for the Arts, which the article says would be “eliminated entirely” under the proposed changes, along with its sister agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities.

A Mood Ring for Your Wrist

Feb 18, 2017

Refugees are freezing to flee the US for Canada

Feb 17, 2017

Winters in Canada get cold. Really, really cold.

So people would have to be pretty desperate to walk across the wide expanses of deep snow separating Canada from the US.

But that’s what’s happening.

Donald Trump isn’t the only news event on Earth

Feb 17, 2017
Carlos Barria/Reuters

Love it or hate it, President Donald Trump's White House commands a lot of media attention.

It seems like newspapers, talk shows and social media all have been filled with an avalanche of executive orders, chaotic White House press briefings, dubious White House-Kremlin connections and a barrage of Trump’s accusations of "fake news."

We love music here at The World, and we love to share our latest favorites with you. From a DJ in Barcelona to Latin rockers in Miami, give a listen to some of what we loved in February.

Dogs are picky when it comes to music

Donald Trump's pick for ambassador to Israel began his confirmation process in the Senate on Thursday. And the first thing David Friedman did was express regret for what he called his "inflammatory" language during the election campaign.

He didn't specify what that language was, but it probably included the word “kapo,” a German word with connotations that are highly insulting to Jews.

Born Star Training Center, which opened two years ago, is New York’s first K-Pop cram school. It’s actually a branch of a chain founded in South Korea back in 2008 by a "real" Korean pop star, Tae-Won Kim, a famous guitarist/producer in a band called Boohwal.

Sophie Choi, the director of Born Star, was a student at the cram school only a year ago. "Times passed, things happened, and now I'm here taking care of the kids," she says.

The frigid deep sea is considered Earth’s final frontier.  

We know little about life in the deepest parts of the ocean, but new evidence shows we’re already having an impact on it.

Recent tests on shrimp-like crustaceans that live more than six miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean in the Mariana Trench show high levels of long-banned, cancer-causing pollutants in their bodies.

School haze

Feb 17, 2017

Across the country, thousands of public schools are within 500 feet of pollution-choked roads like highways and truck routes. Next time on Reveal, we investigate the high levels of exhaust surrounding U.S. schools and how the bad air is affecting the millions of children who are breathing it in.

Courtesy of the Krump family&nbsp;

Since Kristina Krump and her husband, Nicholas, started dating, they’ve dreamed about leaving Phoenix to live abroad, maybe after sending their last child to college, or in retirement. In the meantime, they and their three boys spend a month every summer in Latin America.

Last year, the family went to Costa Rica and Nicaragua. It was a welcome break, Kristina Krump said, from US politics and bad news.

The No. 1 challenge of retirement

Feb 17, 2017

Working Americans who save for retirement spend a lot of time and energy making decisions on how to save. It’s confusing, it’s hard. But you know what? It doesn’t get any easier when you hit retirement. One of the biggest stresses is trying to organize your finances when you don’t know how long you’re going to be around to need them. Economists have a favorite method for dealing with this anxiety: It’s called an income annuity, but it’s not quite a household name yet.  

Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

China has the second largest movie box office in the world. So it’s no wonder that Hollywood panders to Chinese audiences and censors.

Marvel Studio cast Chinese superstar Fan Bingbing in “Iron Man 3” — even though they cut her scenes from the international version of film. The Chinese government saves humanity in “2012” and “Transformers: Age of Extinction,” and the heroes of “The Avengers,” in an act of flagrant Chinese product placement, use Vivo V3 phones.

These Cuban Americans are spending their own money to send others to Cuba

Feb 17, 2017
Maria Murriel/PRI

For decades, some Cuban exiles have felt disdain at the thought of visiting their home island. That's meant some Cuban Americans have only stories, or maybe a few photos or keepsakes, from their families' native land. But now, four children of exiles are trying to help young Cuban Americans form their own memories of Cuba.

Russian state media ordered to scale back positive coverage of Donald Trump

Feb 17, 2017

The Kremlin ordered Russian state media on Thursday to stop praising Donald Trump. It was a big change, and an indication that the Putin-Trump "bromance" could be on the rocks.

NASA is the government’s space agency, but not all of what NASA does is linked to space. A good portion of its work is more inward looking and has to do with our own planet — things like weather and climate change. Some Republicans are talking about rebalancing NASA's priorities and moving away from that research and refocusing on space exploration. But what potential impacts could that rebalancing have? 

What was missing from Facebook’s 5,000-word manifesto

Feb 17, 2017
Marketplace

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg shared some deep thoughts this week in a long essay about where he sees humanity going online. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke with senior tech correspondent Molly Wood about what the nearly 5,000-word treatise had to say. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation. 

Kai Ryssdal: So here it is, 5,700-something words from Mark Zuckerberg. Yes, 1.9 billion people use Facebook, but it seemed to me there was no "there there" in this thing. There was no action coming out of this.

Courtesy of Tsuya Hohri Yee

Tsuya Hohri Yee’s family was once imprisoned by the US government. They were deemed a national security threat because of their ancestry. That’s why President Donald Trump’s executive order that targets refugees and certain immigrants hit hard.

“The news landed like a ton of bricks and my heart sunk realizing that other communities were to face what we faced 75 years ago,” Yee says in an email.

U.S. food company Kraft Heinz offered $143 billion for the British-Dutch consumer goods conglomerate Unilever. Unilever rejected the proposal, but Kraft Heinz said it looks forward to reaching an agreement on the terms of a transaction. If the deal does eventually go ahead, it would be one of the largest acquisitions on record. It's just a year since Heinz and Kraft Foods merged, but these big-time mergers are nothing new for the industry.

Here's what you need to know when crossing international borders

Feb 17, 2017
Todd Korol/Reuters&nbsp;&nbsp;

We’ve learned a lot about how entering the country and crossing borders work these days. 

We know our phones and laptops are subject to search and seizure when we’re crossing a border, even if we don’t have to unlock anything for officers. 

But what else should we know? What other rights do we have, if any, in that no-man’s-land between the plane and the international arrivals exit?

Sam Beard

In Europe, Brexit has put Grexit in the shade. The British vote to leave the European Union has dominated the economic headlines since last summer’s referendum and overshadowed the fear that Greece — the EU’s most vulnerable and debt-laden country — would crash out of the Eurozone. But could Grexit be poised for a comeback? We may get the answer on Monday. Euro finance ministers meet to consider whether the Greeks should get the next installment of their bailout money, money they must have before July if they are to avoid defaulting on some of their loans.

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