National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

‘Nancy’ goes back to the drawing board

Jun 21, 2018

The spunky, spikey-haired little girl Nancy debuted on newspaper comics page in 1933. But in her 85 year history, she has only been drawn by men — until now.

In April, Olivia Jaimes debuted as the first woman cartoonist to draw “Nancy.” And in rebooting the comic strip, she’s introducing a distinctly 21st century sensibility, filled with jokes about social media.

“I love this strip so much that I want to bring it to a new generation,” says Jaimes. “And I want to translate it into terms they can understand.”

Released on June 28, 1988, Public Enemy’s “It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back” broke ground in both its experimental production techniques and socially conscious lyrics. When asked about the goal of the album, Public Enemy lead rapper Chuck D said, “Our sole intention was to destroy music.” 

Do you think the Supreme Court shops online?

Jun 21, 2018

We're asking because today a narrow majority ruled that online shoppers have to pay state sales tax, even if the business doesn’t have a physical presence in the state. We'll talk about what that means for companies like Wayfair, the defendant in this case, and consumers. Then we'll bring you the latest on gas prices for the summer. Plus: Brownsville, Texas, is just a 10-minute walk from Matamoros, a city in Tamaulipas, Mexico. As the Trump administration's immigration policy causes tension nationally, Brownsville's local economy feels its effects firsthand.

That's what Kansas Senator Pat Roberts said to Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross at Wednesday's Finance Committee hearing. He also asked if Ross would personally call one of his constituents, Mike Bergmeier, who works at a company that makes agricultural equipment in Hutchinson, Kansas. Ross promised to call Bergmeier and he kept that promise. We also gave Bergmeier a call to see what he had to say about steel tariff exemptions in the agriculture industry.

Supreme Court rules for states in online sales tax case

Jun 21, 2018

The Supreme Court says states can force online shoppers to pay sales tax.

The 5-4 ruling Thursday is a win for states, who said they were losing out on billions of dollars annually under two decades-old Supreme Court decisions that impacted online sales tax collection.

When companies take a stand on immigration

Jun 21, 2018

(Markets Edition) Stocks are down right now for several German car companies, including Daimler, BMW and Volkswagen. The likely cause: tariff threats. Diane Swonk, chief economist at the consulting and accounting firm Grant Thornton, explains how these tariff decisions aren't accounting for our global supply chain. Afterwards, we'll look at how several corporations are pushing back against the Trump administration's immigration policies.

Another government shutdown might be around the corner

Jun 21, 2018

The U.S. already had one government shutdown earlier this year, now we might be headed toward another this October. 

Frightening stories about climate change seem to come in a never-ending wave these days.

OPEC poised to shift oil agreements

Jun 21, 2018

Representatives from oil producing nations are in Vienna for the biannual OPEC summit. The organization’s most recent agreement capped production. But demand is soaring, so some significant changes could come out of this round of meetings. That’s because of varying goals among oil producing countries.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(U.S. Edition) Reps from oil-producing countries are meeting for the bi-annual OPEC summit, and it has the potential to turn sour. We'll look at the varying goals these nations have and the geopolitical factors that could complicate this meeting. Afterwards, we'll discuss reports that the Trump administration is planning to combine the U.S.

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday ending his administration’s policy of separating migrant children and parents at the southern border. Instead, the order says, they will be kept together in detention as their legal cases are resolved.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … New retaliatory measures are aimed at the U.S., this time from India in response to steel and aluminium tariffs. Then, it’s a big day for Greece as its creditors are expected to unveil an economic road map for the country’s third bailout. Afterwards, roads, railways, and bridges were supposed to form the foundations of a prosperous economy in Zambia. But the country has borrowed too much too quickly and now it’s in trouble.

Is the e-scooter craze more bubble than business?

Jun 21, 2018

Venture capitalists have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in scooters — electric scooters, specifically. On a sunny day in San Francisco, they're clogging every sidewalk. Lime and Bird are the two best-known options. They also operate in Santa Monica, California; Washington, D.C.; Austin, Texas; and Atlanta. You use an app to check out a scooter, GPS tracks your location and you just drop it anywhere when you're done with it. There's speculation that Uber or Lyft will buy one of the bigger companies since both have invested in electric bikes. Bird is being valued at $2 billion.

Is the e-scooter craze more bubble than business?

Jun 21, 2018

Venture capitalists have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in scooters — electric scooters, specifically. On a sunny day in San Francisco, they're clogging every sidewalk. Lime and Bird are the two best-known options. They also operate in Santa Monica, California; Washington, D.C.; Austin, Texas; and Atlanta. You use an app to check out a scooter, GPS tracks your location and you just drop it anywhere when you're done with it. There's speculation that Uber or Lyft will buy one of the bigger companies since both have invested in electric bikes.

Bonnie Siegler is one of the most prominent designers working today. Her firm, Eight and a Half, has designed some very high profile logos, including those of “Saturday Night Live,” “Late Night with Seth Meyers,” Orbitz and dozens of other TV shows and companies.

Earlier this year, corporate titans Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett and Jamie Dimon announced they would team up to form a new health care company. Their mission: Improve health and save a few bucks for the 1 million people who work for Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase. Today we learned that Atul Gawande will lead this still-to-be-named venture. Gawande is an accomplished surgeon, a Harvard professor, a staff writer at the New Yorker and a best-selling author.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

With NBA picks, data can only take you so far

Jun 20, 2018

The NBA draft takes place tomorrow in Brooklyn, when teams make big bets on young players, hoping they might been the next LeBron James or Steph Curry, that once-in-a-generation player who can transform a team's fortunes. But these players are notoriously risky investments.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

The UK’s move away from coal means they’re burning wood from the US

Jun 20, 2018

The 12 cooling towers at the Drax Power Station have dominated the flat North Yorkshire countryside since the plant was built to burn coal from local mines in the '60s.

How a red-hot housing market made Zillow a media company

Jun 20, 2018

A few years before the financial crisis hit, Spencer Rascoff was among the entrepreneurs who started a new website devoted to real estate. They named it Zillow, and it was meant to hold all the data and information consumers needed to buy and sell their homes. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal talked to Rascoff, who is now CEO, about the years the company's spent collecting data as home values crashed, recovered and are now skyrocketing. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation. 

Ireland is famous for its hospitality, offering visitors an abundance of “craic,” or fun.

And that warmest of warm welcomes has been extended to embrace foreign corporations, too. If they set up in Ireland, they get to pay one of the lowest rates of corporate tax in the European Union: 12.5 percent compared with the recently reduced rate of 21 percent in the United States. There are numerous, generous tax breaks in the Emerald Isle as well.

Let's do the Zestimate

Jun 20, 2018

If you've been listening the past few weeks, you know the federal government is working on a list of companies to exclude from new, costly tariffs on steel and aluminum. During testimony today about that list, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross promised one senator that he’d personally consider a company residing in the senator's district. Ross called the place right after the hearing, and we did, too. Then: Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett and Jamie Dimon have tapped surgeon and writer Atul Gawande to run their new health care company.

Lisseth has been locked up in family immigration detention for close to 365 days with her 6-year-old and she wants it to be known.

That’s why she joined a hunger strike at Berks County Residential Center in Pennylvania. After 16 days of skipping the three meals offered, Lisseth says she began to feel weak and nauseated. She is from El Salvador and crossed the southern border in Texas to seek asylum in the US. She fears retaliation for speaking to the press, so she asked us not to use her real name.

At 9 years old, my grandfather Lew Din Wing was separated from his family and placed in immigration detention.

In 2002, I went to visit YeYe in his San Francisco apartment and I brought a tape recorder with me. He told me about his experience in detention in the last conversation we had before he died. Now, 16 years later, I can still listen to his voice, his labored breathing, and his life story. Or at least I can listen to the story he wanted to live on.

How far would you go to have a biological child?

Jun 20, 2018

Surrogacy is a multimillion-dollar, global industry. People who face infertility have tough choices when it comes to deciding whether to keep trying to get pregnant via infertility treatments like in vitro fertilization — only to experience disappointment when it doesn’t take — or resort to surrogacy, which can get complicated.

A key battle to capture a seaport in Yemen is entering its second week, as residents and humanitarian workers worry fighting could soon reach civilian neighborhoods.

Yemeni troops, backed by the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, claim to have captured an airport just south of the city of Hodeidah. And inside the city center, residents can hear explosions from airstrikes, artillery and mortars.

Even the markets care about sound bites

Jun 20, 2018

(Markets Edition) From a markets perspective, we're in a lull right now. No data releases, no big announcements from the Fed. But they will be looking out for soundbites, especially around trade, according to Westwood Holdings Group's Susan Schmidt. We'll hear from her about how all this tariff talk could *eventually* cause concern to creep into the markets. Afterwards, we'll discuss a new technology that'll help preserve avocados, and then we'll chat with the Economist's Natasha Loder about why automation doesn't necessarily spell doom for radiologists.

Spencer Rascoff has been at Zillow, the company familiar to many a person searching for a home or apartment, pretty much from the beginning. Since 2005, he's weathered the housing crisis and another housing boom. And as CEO, he's leading the real estate/tech/data company into a new market: buying and selling its own homes. He talked with us about where the housing market's been and where it's going. 

Holy guacamole! That avocado could last four weeks.

Jun 20, 2018

Giving a whole new meaning to shelf life, avocados wearing a life-extending plant-based coating debut this week on U.S. grocery shelves. It’s one of the first products to potentially help cut down the billions of dollars in food waste each year in the United States.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

The facilities that are housing children separated from their parents

Jun 20, 2018

Who's getting paid to carry out the Trump administration's policy of separating children?

In March, the Trump administration ordered prosecutors to charge people illegally crossing the border and separate children traveling with their parents. Marketplace's Andy Uhler looked at the money that flows into the facilities housing these children, starting with a firm called Southwest Key. Below is an edited transcript. 

David Brancaccio: Tell me more about this company. How did this nonprofit grow to be such a key player in this industry?

(U.S. Edition) We're looking into who's getting paid to carry out the Trump administration's policy of separating children at the U.S. border. One of the principal firms: Southwest Key. Afterwards, we'll discuss what to expect from today's Senate testimony with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who's likely to get an earful on tariffs, and then we'll talk about a new "life-extending" coating for avocados.

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