National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

Will Wilbur Ross be good for trade?

Jan 10, 2017

Update: After this story aired, Ross' hearing was delayed to January 18. The original audio appears above.

New York to shutter huge nuclear energy plant

Jan 10, 2017

The state of New York now finds itself facing a big, big energy test. It’s just announced the phase out of a mammoth nuclear energy plant just up the Hudson River from New York City.

But now it has to replace all that power, and it’s committed to doing so in a low-carbon way. We will likely see this test play out across the country, as more and more aging nuclear plants find themselves on the energy endangered list.

What a 48-team World Cup means for FIFA — and soccer fans

Jan 10, 2017
Kai Ryssdal and Robert Garrova

News is out today that soccer's international governing body, FIFA, is increasing the number of teams in the World Cup to 48. FIFA's current president Gianni Infrantino pushed for more teams, which will likely affect FIFA's revenue.

Sam Harnett

Recreational marijuana is legal in California, but there is still no place to buy it, and there will not be until the state works out regulations. That could take a year. In the meantime, local governments are laying out rules on where marijuana can be bought and sold.

As you could imagine, these rules are having an impact on the real estate market for commercial marijuana spaces. The general trend is limited supply and high prices.

Brand identity is the key for magazines

Jan 10, 2017
Reema Khrais

While visiting Los Angeles, British tourists Harvey Marcus and Cassie Steer stopped by a nearby newsstand. After scanning the hundreds of titles, Marcus, with a shrug, said he probably wouldn’t buy one.

“I don’t think they’re worth the money,” he said.

And Marcus happens to know a thing or two about the business. He’s an editor at Schön, a London-based magazine about fashion and art. Meanwhile, his girlfriend is a former beauty director for the U.K. edition of the fashion magazine InStyle. 

So, what are they doing in Los Angeles?

JaeRan Kim

Former Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson only divested from his company last week. The prospect of an oil executive leading international diplomatic ties has caused a lot of concern for those worried about climate change, a major international issue. It's still unclear what impact his appointment would have on policies. 

Much of that stems from the lingering uncertainties over what the Trump Administration’s policies will be, said Kevin Book, managing director of Clearview Energy Partners.

Blog: Make Me Smart update

Jan 10, 2017

Hey everyone,

Just a quick update to let you know that we're working hard to get ready for the official launch of "Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly," our new podcast dedicated to, you guessed it,  getting smart about business, tech, culture, and how all those things affect each other and your everyday lives.

Our first show will go live Tuesday January 24, right after inauguration weekend.

Here are some things you can do until then:

Subscribe to the podcast!

Will the federal anti-nepotism law apply to Jared Kushner?

Jan 10, 2017
David Brancaccio

Donald Trump has tapped his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, to become a senior White House adviser. Kushner will tackle trade and middle east policy, among other issues, in the role. 

The resale market for sneakers is red hot

Jan 10, 2017
Sally Herships

Chris Burns used to be a college English professor. Then, in 2011 he opened his Amazon store, Arch-USA, selling limited edition sneakers.

“From Black Friday in November to December 31, 2011, I made $65,000,” he said.  In one month, Burns doubled his yearly salary as an English professor. “That was it,” he said. “I walked into the dean's office and I said, 'Hey man, I'm done.'”

Millennials actually aren’t noncommittal slackers, says new study

Jan 10, 2017
Donna Tam and Marielle Segarra

Millennial leaders are more likely than their older counterparts to work at their companies for more than 15 years, according to a report published today by The Conference Board.

01/10/17: Sneakers as currency

Jan 10, 2017

President-elect Trump has tapped his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, to become a senior White House adviser. But Lyndon B. Johnson signed a federal anti-nepotism law back in the '60s. Will it prevent Kushner from nabbing the position? Historian Joshua Zeitz breaks down how the law came about and whether it contains any loopholes. Next, we'll look at the limited-edition sneaker market, where sellers can make thousands in just weeks.

Rich Clement/Reuters

At the beginning of 1967, one place Americans couldn't go was Hanoi, North Vietnam.

It was two years after President Lyndon B. Johnson escalated the Vietnam War, and at home, the narrative of the first televised war was still that of good guys fighting for freedom.

But in late December 1966, that perspective changed.

Mike Hutchings/Reuters/File Photo

If you remember Darth Vader’s famous line in "Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back," as “Luke, I am your father,” you’re not alone — but you’re not right, either. His actual words are “No, I am your father.”

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/chipgriffin/2329007153/">Chip Griffin</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>&nbsp;(image cropped)

What’s a nine-letter phrase for "colorful swallow?"

Before you hit the Audubon books, here’s another hint: “The English language is incredibly fluid,” says Brendan Emmett Quigley.

Quigley has been making crosswords for The New York Times for two decades, ever since he was a senior in college. That makes him a "cruciverbalist" — and as he explains it, his job is to twist the mind of the crossword puzzle’s "solver." 

The art and science of composing movie scores

Jan 8, 2017
Baher Kairy/CC0. Image cropped.

Imagine what some of the most thrilling films ever made would be like without their musical scores.

How Pittsburgh remembers a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright

Jan 7, 2017
phillq23/<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pittsburgh,_Pennsylvania.jpg">Wikimedia Commons</a>

The first film adaptation of August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play “Fences” hit theaters around the country on Christmas Day. “Fences” is one of 10 plays in what the late playwright called his "Century Cycle," about African American life. There’s a play for each decade of the 20th century, and all but one is set against the backdrop of Pittsburgh, where Wilson grew up.

Millennials are the new 'fossil fuel freedom fighters'

Jan 7, 2017
John Silvercloud/Flickr

A new generation of nature writers is coming of age in America. They are beginning to understand how much of the pristine landscape their parents and grandparents enjoyed is now gone.

Cracking Open How Dinosaurs Hatched

Jan 7, 2017

A Trip to a Gadget Nirvana

Jan 7, 2017

Create Your Own Tractor Beam

Jan 7, 2017

Kenya tries to come to grips with treating mental illness

Jan 6, 2017
Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

At age 17, Sitawa Wafula was diagnosed with both epilepsy and bipolar disorder. As a young woman living in Kenya, a country where mental health issues are still seen as a spiritual taboo, Wafula struggled to make sense of her health problems.

Durreen Shahnaz calls herself a “defiant optimist.” She’s the first Bangladeshi woman to graduate from the Wharton School of Business and to work on Wall Street, and she’s spending her life coming up with new ways to invest social capital.

Back in 2013, Shahnaz launched the Impact Investment Exchange Asia. This social stock exchange is going strong today and has funded a number of projects in places like Bangladesh, Cambodia and the Philippines.

William Urdaneta/Reuters&nbsp;

In Venezuela, the food shortage has become so dire that some people spend their days picking up grains of rice and corn that fall out of delivery trucks.

That's according to Hannah Dreier, a correspondent for The Associated Press who is based in the South American country. She contributed to the AP's recent investigative report about the state of affairs and has seen firsthand that many people are on the brink of starvation. 

America's digital dumping ground

Jan 5, 2017

You got that new computer or phone you wanted for the holidays – but what happens to your old gadgets? They might not end up where you expect. Next time on Reveal, environmentalists follow the global trail of America’s electronic castoffs.

Jim Young/Reuters

Will 2017 be different for Chicago?

Last year, violence there reached levels not seen since the late 1990s, with 3,550 shooting incidents and 762 murders. And the city's kids were often the unintended victims of a spiking crime rate.

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