National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

Aussie eclipse chaser heads to Idaho for 16th eclipse

Aug 16, 2017

Roughly 200 million people live within a day’s drive of next Monday's eclipse.

But eclipse chasers road-tripping to the path of totality will also be joined by those traveling much farther to stand in the shadow of the moon for just a few minutes.

Among them is Terry Cuttle, an amateur astronomer, and photographer, traveling from Brisbane, Australia, to the US to see his 16th total solar eclipse.

He’s been planning this trip for years and is aiming for eastern Idaho where the chances of clear weather are good.  

President Trump’s main council of top corporate executives fell apart today following Trump's remarks that the violence at a rally of white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virgina, was perpetrated by many sides. A wave of resignations from the president's American Manufacturing Council started Monday and continued this morning, until Trump abruptly disbanded it and another group with this tweet: 

Why aren't there more female CEOs?

Aug 16, 2017

The number of female CEOs may be higher today than it was 10 years ago, but it's still not great. And in the last couple of months, some high-profile female CEOs have been forced out of their jobs. Julie Creswell at the New York Times and Jena McGregor at the Washington Post have both written about why corporate America has been so slow to hire women for C-suite positions and what happens once women get to those positions. 

 

Before taking action against hate, white people should look inward

Aug 16, 2017

In the aftermath of racist violence like what unfolded in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend, one visceral reaction is a call to action — a call by outraged activists, by politicians who want to provide moral leadership, and by ordinary people who ask themselves what they can do in the face of extraordinary hatred.

28: CEOs quit the CEO in Chief

Aug 16, 2017

Globalization is in the headlines, but what does it mean for our economy? Marketplace's Scott Tong explains it to us. We answer your questions about globalism, nationalism and the companies that have to navigate between these rocky shoals. Plus, we picked our next Make Me Smart book! You've got about a month to read it. Finally, you have questions and answers about bitcoin and cryptocurrency.

CEOs of some of the biggest companies in America have been saying for the past two days they simply had to stay on two White House councils. But after Trump's comments yesterday, more and more of them changed their minds and said a seat at the table wasn't worth it. Finally, President Trump announced via Twitter that he'd be disbanding the councils anyway, thank you very much. We'll talk about what changed the dynamic between the executive in D.C. and all the rest of them. Then: We told you yesterday about the time BMW took a chance on building a huge factory stateside.

08/16/2017: The price tag of letting Obamacare fail

Aug 16, 2017

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office has released a new report evaluating what would happen if Trump cut off Obamacare subsidies. The result: the government will actually end up shelling out more money. We'll take a look at why this move would cost them more, and how taxpayers would be affected. Afterwards, we'll discuss a decline in the number of new homes being built in the U.S., and then talk about fringe sites that are popping up to support white supremacist groups as they get kicked off of more mainstream platforms.

"We make German cars, in America"

Aug 16, 2017

The idea of more open, global trade has been sold as necessary for economic success. Yet today we hear calls to "build a wall" and to break up trading partnerships. Turns out we've seen the pendulum swing between free trade and protectionism many times before. Our series Trade Off looks at key moments when trade barriers have been built up or torn down and at globalization's winners and losers. 

Pop quiz: How are nuclear power plants in the U.S. related to national security? It’s OK if you don’t have an answer, because a new 38-page report from the former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz makes that link explicit. 

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Airbnb, GoDaddy, Google — they've all said to white supremacist groups in so many words: Move on along. Not here. You're not staying with us and your websites aren't welcome. 

This morning, we'll hear from discount retailer Target on how it performed in the second quarter of the year. Last month, Target raised its guidance on sales at stores open at least a year. Analysts will be watching to see how its digital sales perform against big rivals like Amazon, which present ever increasing threats.

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What to expect from today's NAFTA renegotiations

Aug 16, 2017

Attacking the North American Free Trade Agreement was a central part of President Trump's campaign. But as talks between the U.S., Canada and Mexico open up today, his administration has the chance to change it.  

08/16/2017: Let the NAFTA renegotiations begin

Aug 16, 2017

President Trump has dubbed the North American Free Trade Agreement "one of the worst deals ever." Well, now he has a chance to change it as talks to overhaul the pact begin today. One of the original negotiators of the deal, Mickey Kantor, joined us to talk about some of the revisions we might see and why America's trade relationship with Mexico and Canada is so important. Afterwards, we'll look at how Target is faring as the threat of Amazon looms in the background.

The Department of Justice has asked DreamHost for 1.3 million IP addresses connected to a site that organized protests around President Trump's inauguration. On today's show, we'll look at whether there's a historical precedent for such a request, and what this would mean for hosting companies if DreamHost were to give up this information. Afterwards, we'll chat with Alex Klein, CEO of the startup Kano, about the importance of coding.

The summer movie season is rapidly drawing to a close. But you've still got two weeks (maybe three, if your summer runs through Labor Day) to squeeze in a couple of new, foreign documentaries. Matt Holzman, the host of The Document, a podcast from KCRW about seeing the world through documentary films, gave The World's Marco Werman a few recommendations.

1. "Barbecue"

For decades, Red Delicious represented the definition of an of apple. Kids across the nation got them in their lunch bags, and they were ubiquitous on store shelves. But with the explosion in more tasty apple varieties — like Gala, Fuji and Honeycrisp — the Red Delicious has largely fallen out of favor in the US.

Not so in China, though — Red Delicious are huge there. And that’s a big consideration for Washington state growers.

Glen Beltz/Flickr CC BY 2.0

Rising temperatures, partly driven by global warming and longer drought seasons, have turned western forests into easy kindling for raging megafires that could threaten millions of people in the US.

This new, alarming situation has several causes, and a new book lays them out. It’s called "Land On Fire: The New Reality of Wildfire in the West," by nature writer Gary Ferguson.

The place where globalization kept its promise

Aug 15, 2017

The idea of more open, global trade has been sold as necessary for economic success. Yet today we hear calls to "build a wall" and to break up trading partnerships. Turns out we've seen the pendulum swing between free trade and protectionism many times before. Our series Trade Off looks at key moments when trade barriers have been built up or torn down and at globalization's winners and losers. 

President Trump's American Manufacturing Council originally included the chief executives of more than two dozen top U.S. companies, as well as leaders of industry groups and labor unions. Today, it has four fewer members, after Trump made what many called an inadequate response to the deadly weekend violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Of 577 key federal jobs requiring Senate confirmation, only 106 have had nominees put forward by President Trump. That's according to the count by the Washington Post and the Partnership for Public Service. Those vacancies include leadership roles at NASA and NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. With no one at the helm, science-based agencies can’t undertake major new research or other initiatives, and lose their effectiveness. But under the current White House administration, new leadership could be more disruptive.

Amazon is everywhere. Even in economic data.

Aug 15, 2017

Today the retail industry got a small piece of good news in the form of some data from July that was better than expected. The government announced this morning that retail sales last month were up 0.6 percent during the previous month and more than 4 percent from this time last year. Not bad for an industry that’s had a lot of hand wringing of late. One of the reasons for the gain? Amazon Prime Day.  

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The U.S. International Trade Commission, an independent federal agency, starts hearings Tuesday on whether U.S. solar manufacturers are being hurt by foreign competition. The hearings could lead to tariffs being put in place on all foreign-made panels. Such tariffs could have consequences for the entire solar industry. 

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Your pumpkin pie is a lie

Aug 15, 2017

Always leave room for dessert, especially when it's served with a little business history on the side. In her new cookbook, "BraveTart: Iconic American Desserts," Serious Eats senior editor Stella Parks tells how some of the most all-American desserts became so popular in this country. A lot of times, it's because a corporation made it happen.

My Economy tells the story of the new economic normal through the eyes of people trying to make it, because we know the only numbers that really matter are the ones in your economy.

Today’s installment is from Dr. Javier Martinez, CEO of Martinez Brands, a wine and spirits wholesaler and importer in Pasadena, California.

Do you ever bring your child to work with you? Do you feel like you have co-workers that do it way too often? Marketplace Weekend is tackling kids at the office in its latest work advice column from Alison Green, from the popular blog, Ask a Manager

08/15/2017: Why would CEOs stick with Trump?

Aug 15, 2017

An infrastructure announcement turned into an off-the-rails press conference this afternoon as President Trump blasted the four (now five) CEOs who have left his manufacturing council. We'll correct the record on some of his criticisms and then zoom out to the bigger question: If you're a CEO tapped for one of these White House advisory roles, why do you stay? Then: Trump has nominated people to fill just 106 of 577 key Senate-confirmed jobs in his administration. NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are both lacking permanent leadership.

Who are the winners and losers of globalization?

Aug 15, 2017

Slow income growth among the middle class of rich countries like the U.S., Japan and Germany is widely attributed to globalization. A lack of upward mobility has been frustrating for many, leading to an increase of political populism on both sides of the spectrum. Former World Bank economist Branko Milanovic has created the “elephant chart,” which answers the question: Who are the winners and losers of globalization?

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has decided not to launch four missiles toward Guam after all, according to state media reports. Is that what's helping to calm markets? MacroPolicy Perspectives Julia Coronado joined us to talk about some of the factors responsible for this stock market rally. Afterwards, we'll discuss the crowded field of premium rewards cards, and then look at why millennials seem to be disinterested in vintage furniture. 

Bank of America plans to launch a new premium rewards credit card next month. The bank is entering a crowded field of similar products from American Express and Chase, whose Sapphire Reserve card made headlines for its initial 100,000-point sign-up bonus and $450 annual fee. As a result, banks are changing the way they try to lure new customers.

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This is just one of the stories from our "I've Always Wondered" series, where we tackle all of your questions about the world of business, no matter how big or small. Ever wondered if recycling is worth it? Or how store brands stack up against name brands? What do you wonder?

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