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Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

Courtesy of Julio Ramos

Roughly 11,300 people applied to Loyola’s Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago this year. They interviewed about 600 people. About 160 were accepted — the odds of getting in were less than 2 percent.

And 10 of the students they accepted are undocumented, brought to the US as children. They have DACA status, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which gives them a temporary work permit and a chance to become physicians.

One of them is Julio Ramos.

Princeton economist Atif Mian only tweets a few times a month, and most if it is the kind of dry policy stuff you'd expect from a man whose area of specialization is finance and debt, mixed with the occasional foray into politics.

It's smart, but not necessarily viral material.

He hit Twitter gold this week, though, when he made a simple observation about the recent Nobel Laureates that resonated far and wide: Six people living in the US have won the prize in the sciences this year, and all six are immigrants.

Ka Paw Say/Free Burma Rangers

David Eubank is at home in war — so is his family.

Eubank spent 10 years in the Army Special Forces. These days he's an aid worker with a relief group he founded called the Free Burma Rangers.

With his three young kids in tow, he has assisted countless civilians in conflict zones from Myanmar to Afghanistan.

Most recently, Eubank's work has taken him to the besieged city of Mosul, Iraq. That's where Iraqi forces are battling to push ISIS out of the western part of the city. It's a house-by-house fight.

Used to be if you wanted some hand-hewn dreamcatcher earrings or a wallet made of duct tape, there was one place to go: Etsy. The e-commerce website brought artisan-crafted products to customers around the world. It launched with four employees in 2005 and grew into a $1.6 billion public company. But now Etsy’s laying off 15 percent of its staff, the second round of cuts this year. Its problems seem to stem back to when the company let the mass-produced sell alongside the homespun.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Meet the Coast Guard protecting America's East Coast

Jun 21, 2017

Recent attacks abroad — in London, Manchester and Tehran— as well as attacks at home, make us think of the ways in which we're all vulnerable.

Today, we suffer under the constant threat of terrorism. At this point, we're used to heightened security at the airport or at tourist destinations. But what about the threats that come on ships, over our waterways and through our ports? 

The US and North America have two large oceans. And obviously, that's a significant layer of defense from anyone who wants to get here, but it's not an impossible barrier. 

How towns are hurt when malls run into trouble

Jun 21, 2017
Marielle Segarra

After more than 20 years, Jim Quigley left his job at a Wall Street investment firm for a smaller market. He got elected town supervisor in Ulster, New York, about 100 miles north of Manhattan. Population: 12,251.  

“My family's been in this community since 1849,” Quigley said.

These days, Quigley is working 60-hour weeks, trying to keep the town’s budget in the black. He’s been preparing for a drop in tax dollars from Ulster’s largest taxpayer, the Hudson Valley Mall.

Some economists think technology might be slowing inflation

Jun 21, 2017

Should inflation be added to the list of things disrupted by tech? For years, we’ve accepted the integrity of the idea of the Phillips curve: that as unemployment declines, wages rise and companies pass along those increased labor costs in the form of price hikes on goods and services. Inflation. But as unemployment has declined in this economic cycle, we’re seeing very little inflation. Is that because of the influence of technology?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Today is the deadline for health insurance companies to decide if they're going to be in or out of the health care exchanges in 2018. Several of the big insurers, like Anthem and Humana, are bailing on the exchanges in many markets, limiting or eliminating options for patients using Obamacare. But while some companies are jumping ship, others are jumping in — like New York startup Oscar, and Centene, based in St. Louis. Why do these companies see this moment as an opportunity when many others are fleeing?

Kai Ryssdal

The calendar says today is the first day of summer, so we're going to take a look at the business of vacations. Specifically, a vacation tens of millions of Americans take every year: cruises.

Carnival Corp. is one of the biggest travel and leisure companies in the world, encompassing not just Carnival lines but also Princess and Holland America, among others.

In the catfish economy, things are hopeful

Jun 21, 2017
Kai Ryssdal

We like to talk to small business owners in order to get a handle on how the economy feels. Catfish farmer Townsend Kyser, who runs Kyser Family Farms with his father, is someone we check in with every so often. The last time we spoke to Kyser, Barack Obama was still in the White House. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal gave Kyser a call to see how his business is doing. Below in an edited transcript of their conversation. 

Townsend Kyser: Good to talk to you again, Kai. How are you?

Kai Ryssdal: How are the catfish?

Jana Kasperkevic

If there were any lingering doubts about whether video game tournaments were becoming a mainstream phenomenon, today those doubts were dispelled.

NBC Sports Group, part of media giant NBCUniversal, has announced it will launch an esport tournament of its own. Participants will compete in regional, national and international rounds. More than 40 hours of coverage will be available via live-streaming and video-on-demand. The game chosen for the inaugural tournament, Rocket League, pits players, as vehicular avatars, in a soccer match.

Kai Ryssdal

It's officially summer, as you may have heard, so this week’s Corner Office is all about the business of vacations. Cruises, actually, under the umbrella of Carnival Corp. Carnival is one of the biggest travel and leisure companies in the world. Its brands include Carnival, of course, but also Princess and Holland America. This week, Kai talks with Arnold Donald, who’s been president and CEO of Carnival since 2013.

 

Marketplace

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is making his time away from the C-suite permanent amid investor pressure and a PR firestorm. Kalanick's company changed transportation as we know it, and his aggressive attitude toward growth over everything got the company where it is today in every sense. We'll talk about it. Then: As the GOP keeps hashing out its bill behind closed doors, insurers are deciding whether to stay on Obamacare exchanges. Some big players are dropping out, and that's giving smaller companies an opportunity.

06/21/2017: The future of Uber

Jun 21, 2017

Uber has just undergone a shareholder revolt. Investors have ousted CEO Travis Kalanick following investigations that found widespread abuse in the company's workplace. Adam Lashinsky, an executive editor at Fortune who's also authored a book on Uber, joined us to talk about whether Uber has what it takes to turn itself around, and where Kalanick fits into the future of the company. Afterwards, we'll look at Ford's decision to move production of its next-generation Focus model to China, and then talk about the market for selling Obamacare policies. 

Ford moving compact car production to China

Jun 21, 2017
Adam Allington

Several months after scrapping plans to shift production of the next-generation Ford Focus to Mexico, the company now says it will built the compact car in China instead.

Ford was slammed by President Trump repeatedly over the proposed Mexico move and the administration raised the possibly of punitive tariffs for carmakers who located south of the border.

Uber CEO's resignation doesn't change his voting power

Jun 21, 2017
Marketplace staff

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick may have been forced to resign the top spot at the company, but don’t count him out just yet.

Word came out on Tuesday night that investors had ousted him, a move following investigations into the company’s culture and allegations of sexual harassment. Uber has already fired 20 employees amid these probes. Kalanick remains on the board of directors at the company. 

Why are subprime auto loans still a thing?

Jun 21, 2017
Jana Kasperkevic

What are subprime auto loans? 

When it's literally too hot to fly

Jun 21, 2017
Kim Adams

When air gets really hot, like 120 degrees hot, it means two things for the air-traveling public in the Southwestern United States. One, your plane will have to go faster to generate enough airflow over its wings to get enough lift to get off the ground. But two, the engines on those planes will generate less thrust.

In other words, your flight could get canceled because it's literally too hot to fly.

It's "Technology Week" at the White House. So, naturally, President Trump is heading to farm country today. If that seems incongruous, you may not know there's a lot of high-tech stuff going on in the growing field of "precision agriculture.” Farmers are using all sorts of technology to determine the most efficient growing practices, which agriculture specialists will discuss with Trump during his Iowa trip.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

06/21/2017: Crowdsourcing our brains

Jun 21, 2017
Marketplace

President Trump has called for a "sweeping transformation of the federal government's technology," but is that achievable? Matt Cutts of the U.S. Digital Service — which works on modernizing tech, one crisis at a time — joined us to talk about what his team does and whether progress is possible. Afterwards, we'll look at Amazon's latest attempt at world domination: the launch of a clothes shopping service that will let you order clothes and return them for free if you don't like them.

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick resigns under investor pressure

Jun 21, 2017
Associated Press

DETROIT (AP) — Travis Kalanick, the combative and troubled CEO of ride-hailing giant Uber, has resigned under pressure from investors at a pivotal time for the company.

Uber's board confirmed the move early Wednesday, saying in a statement that Kalanick is taking time to heal from the death of his mother in a boating accident "while giving the company room to fully embrace this new chapter in Uber's history.'' He will remain on the Uber Technologies Inc. board.

Today  is the deadline for insurers to submit plans for selling policies on the Obamacare exchanges in 2018. The political climate has destabilized the market for many insurers, and 44 counties have already decided to pull out entirely, leaving thousands potentially without coverage.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

06/21/2017: Uber investors oust CEO Travis Kalanick

Jun 21, 2017
Marketplace

A group of investors have pushed out Uber's founder and CEO following a series of controversies, including allegations of sexual harassment. On today's show, we'll take a look about what's in store for the ride-sharing company's future and how much power Kalanick still has left within the company. Plus: A look at how technology is helping farmers determine the most efficient growing practices. 

Antarctica is getting greener

Jun 20, 2017

Antarctica is changing.

The typical image is that of a pristine, white wilderness of ice and snow. “The white of the snow, the brown of the rocks, and the blue of the sky is a perfect day on the Antarctic Peninsula,” says researcher Dominic Hodgson of the British Antarctic Survey.     

But Hodgson says there is increasingly a new color: green.

The US shares the blame for a massacre in Mexico

Jun 20, 2017

The "war on drugs" has been part of American policy for so long that it's sometimes difficult to remember that the DEA wages that war every day, on both sides of the border with Mexico.

But it's incredibly difficult to counter the power cartels can hold over the Mexican government, and when things wrong, there are deadly reprecussions. 

Carlos Barria/Reuters 

In normal times, the Islamic holy month of Ramadan is a time for fasting, prayer and contemplation. But after this week’s murder of a 17-year-old high school girl in Sterling, Virginia, it’s also a time for mourning. 

Her name was Nabra Hassanen. 

We often hear that healthcare accounts for a staggering one-sixth of the U.S. economy. According to the most recent data from the Center for Medicaid & Medicare services, we spend $3.2 trillion dollars a year on healthcare.  That is, indeed, about a sixth of our GDP.  Here’s what we spend it on, and why it’s so much. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Why Americans should be taking more vacations

Jun 20, 2017
Kai Ryssdal and Emily Henderson

About half of workers in the U.S. didn't use all of their vacation days last year. 2016 saw 662 million available days left on the table. Travel and Leisure magazine wants to change that with a special issue that features travel deals and tips to get more Americans to take some time off.

Why do big companies support a carbon tax?

Jun 20, 2017

A group called the Climate Leadership Council put out a plan for a carbon tax earlier this year, and it’s made up not just of environmentalist types, though there are some of those, but also conservative Republicans and business leaders. Its founding members include multinational corporations, including fossil fuel and auto companies like Exxon Mobil, BP and GM.

Four months after the desecration of Jewish graves in St. Louis, the historic Chesed Shel Emeth cemetery looks better than ever. But the Jewish community is still grappling with what the incident means.

In February, almost two hundred headstones were found cracked or toppled. Karen Aroesty, regional director of the Anti-Defamation League, remembers rushing to the the cemetery as soon as she heard the news. “I didn’t expect to be as sad as I was,” she said.

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