National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos wants states to decide how federal education dollars are spent. This week, Reveal examines how states might spend that money and what the change could mean for the nation’s students. Plus, we’ll look at how special ed students in Texas were denied the education they are guaranteed under federal civil rights law.

For a decade, journalist Paula Froelich was the deputy editor of the New York Post’s celebrity and gossip section, Page Six. Like many others who have traveled in Hollywood circles, she has a story about the now-infamous media mogul, Harvey Weinstein.

Her story begins in the year 2000, when Froelich attended a party — a party where Weinstein was also a guest.

Mike Blake/Reuters

Deadly wildfires are ripping across Northern California, scorching more than 115,000 acres across eight counties. At least 13 people have been confirmed dead.

Multiple fires are now burning across the region’s wine country, which includes Sonoma, Napa and Mendocino counties. The blazes have forced tens of thousands of people to evacuate and destroyed 1,500 structures, including mobile home parks, houses and wineries.

While President Donald Trump has dismissed climate change as a hoax, the Department of Defense is focused on understanding and preparing for continued climate disruption and the security threats it poses in a warming world.

When Hurricane Irma hit Florida, it blasted an estimated 3 to 10 feet of storm surge into the Everglades. Combined with the drenching rain, the storm may change the vegetation patterns of the enormous wetland and perhaps prod the people of South Florida to rethink how it lives with its water.

The hurricanes that recently smashed islands in the Caribbean set records for size, strength and endurance — records that experts predict will be broken sooner rather than later, as global warming continues to heat the oceans and intensify precipitation cycles.

Dessima Williams, former Grenada UN ambassador, says the Caribbean people remain resilient and self-reliant, but they have limited financial capacity to recover and rebuild.

At Climate Week 2017, a mix of optimism and urgency

Oct 7, 2017

When the world’s leaders gathered in New York for the annual fall meeting of the UN General Assembly, another series of meetings took place, called Climate Week NYC, where government, business and NGO leaders discussed global climate solutions. 

The mood at Climate Week this year was “a strange confluence of optimism and urgency,” says Alden Meyer, a climate diplomacy expert with the Union of Concerned Scientists, who came to New York City for the meetings.

Rediscovering your favorite kids’ books as an adult

Oct 5, 2017
Courtesy of Bruce Handy

In his new book, “Wild Things: The Joy of Reading Children’s Literature as an Adult,” Bruce Handy makes a case for books aimed at kids not just being a narcotic to put them to sleep, but rather literature in its purest form.

From “Where the Wild Things Are” to “Charlotte’s Web,” Handy revisits childhood classics that still hold up — and a few that don’t. He joins Kurt Andersen to discuss some of their favorite books and offer insight about their creators.

Michael Chabon — the punk years

Oct 5, 2017
Stacy Weiss

In the 1980s, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was home to a thriving post-punk music scene.

As a freshman at Carnegie Mellon University, author Michael Chabon was captivated by the music — especially by a band called “Carsickness.”

This Van Gogh movie looks like his paintings

Oct 5, 2017

The new animated movie, “Loving Vincent,” is not only about Vincent van Gogh — it’s also animated in the style of his post-impressionist paintings.

Each frame was meticulously oil-painted in Van Gogh’s signature style, but based on live-action reference footage featuring actors Saoirse Ronan and Chris O’Dowd. In the words of Hugh Welchman, who co-directed, co-wrote, and co-produced the film with his wife, Dorota Kobiela, “We just invented the slowest form of animation ... or probably filmmaking all together.”

Courtesy of IFC Films

How did a soldier in World War II end up writing the definitive novel for angsty teens?

Danny Strong — co-creator of “Empire,” writer of “Game Change” and “Recount” — answers that question with his directorial debut, “Rebel the Rye.”

Desperate to reduce crowding in jails and prisons, court systems all over the country are trying diversion – alternatives to putting offenders behind bars. On this week's Reveal, we peek behind diversion’s good intentions and uneven results.

Moira Brown/The New England Aquarium, Wikimedia Commons

The discovery of 13 right whale carcasses, most of them in Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence, is causing alarm among scientists.

Only about 500 right whales remain in the North Atlantic, so 13 deaths represent more than 2 percent of the population. Seeing 10 of those deaths in the Gulf of St Lawrence, an area far north of the whale’s usual summer range in the Gulf of Maine, is “completely unprecedented,” according to Erin Meyer-Gutbrod, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Going to laughter yoga (part two)

Sep 28, 2017
Sebastien Gendry/Flikr Creative Commons

In part one, Kurt Andersen and Mary Harris decided to check out laughter yoga. Now that they’ve spent an hour faking laughter and hugging strangers, what’s their conclusion?

For Kurt and Mary, the class felt awkward, sometimes excruciatingly so. But Kurt had started the class feeling jet-lagged from an overseas flight. And after laughter yoga?

“To tell the truth, after our hour there, I did feel better,” Kurt says. “I felt my jet lag remediated.”

“Yeah, and I felt kind of weirdly energized,” Mary adds.

Take two laughs and call me in the morning

Sep 28, 2017
Rachel Jensen / Courtesy of The Northwestern Center for Bioethics & Medical Humanities

Doctors, nurses, and other healthcare providers have to deal daily with subjects considered taboo in polite company.

That’s why the medical field has always been a ripe subject for irreverent comedy on shows like “M*A*S*H,” “Scrubs” and “The Mindy Project.” But it’s one thing for Hugh Laurie, playing a sardonic surgeon on “House,” to joke about his patients. It would be very different if your real doctor made fun of your illness.

Does the time fit the crime?

Sep 28, 2017

The number of women in U.S. prisons and jails has increased more than 700 percent since 1980. And for 25 years, Oklahoma has led the nation in locking up women. This week on Reveal, we look at the causes behind this spike.

Puerto Rico calls for more federal help after Hurricane Maria

Sep 26, 2017
Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters 

Over the weekend, President Donald Trump spent his time criticizing athletes who protest during the national anthem, all while Puerto Ricans struggled to find gas and water, and their governor pleaded for aid.

Richard Carson/Reuters 

In the aftermath of hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the US needs to rethink its flood insurance programs, experts say.

A few weeks ago, Reveal host Al Letson jumped in to protect someone who was being attacked by counter-protesters in Berkeley, California. We found the man behind the attack. He says he’s a member of antifa and is taking the fight to white nationalists. We also interviewed rally organizers who are connected to right-wing extremists. In the aftermath of the violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, militants from the left and the right are taking their battles to the streets.

Would Superman be a DACA recipient?

Sep 20, 2017
Courtesy of DC Comics

The latest issue of the “Superman” comic has outraged some, and inspired others.

In Action Comics #987, the iconic character steps up to defend immigrants from an armed white American who is angry over the loss of his factory job.

Wild Fish Conservancy

A catastrophic failure of a large aquaculture pen near Cypress Island recently freed thousands of nonnative Atlantic salmon into Puget Sound, near Seattle.

In the aftermath of this outbreak, the Wild Fish Conservancy has launched a lawsuit against Cooke Aquaculture, the international corporation responsible for the accident.

The rise of the new German right

Sep 14, 2017

In just a few days, Germans will go to the polls to vote for a new government in an election that feels strangely familiar. For decades, Germany’s elections have been subdued and predictable, but this campaign cycle has seen a rise of fake news, hate groups and right-wing politicians with a nationalist agenda. There also are allegations of Russian meddling. This week on Reveal, we team up with Coda Story to look at the rise of right-wing populism in Germany’s election.

Barbuda needs the world's help right now

Sep 13, 2017

Barbuda has been left completely devastated by Hurricane Irma. An estimated 95 percent of Barbuda’s structures are damaged, and the entire island of around 1,800 people has been evacuated.

“The damage is complete,” says Ambassador Ronald Sanders, who has served as Antigua and Barbuda’s ambassador to the US since 2015. “For the first time in 300 years, there’s not a single living person on the island of Barbuda — a civilization that has existed on that island for over 300 years has now been extinguished.”

Running from cops

Sep 7, 2017

In cities across America, black men are on the run. On April 4, 2015, in South Carolina, Walter Scott was killed while running away from a police officer. Eight days later, Freddie Gray ran from police in Baltimore. He was caught and later died in custody. On this episode of Reveal, we explore the consequences of fleeing from the police through two stories, both set in Baltimore.

Salman Rushdie is the author of 12 novels, but he’s still best known for his 1988 book “The Satanic Verses.” It garnered charges of blasphemy from Islamist extremists and even led to the ayatollah of Iran placing a $6 million bounty on Rushdie’s head. Rushdie stretched the bounds of realism and fantasy in “The Satanic Verses,” but in his latest novel he’s doing the opposite.

<a href="https://pixabay.com/en/medical-tablets-pills-drug-1572986/">WerbeFabrik</a>/<a href="https://pixabay.com/en/service/terms/#usage">CC0</a>. Image cropped.

When it comes to getting new drugs on the market, testing and clinical trials can take years — but patients with rare or life-threatening illnesses don’t always have that long to wait.

To treat these patients, the Food and Drug Administration accelerates approval of some promising drugs, letting them onto the market based on physical indicators and lab measurements. But afterward, manufacturers must conduct post-approval clinical trials to confirm the drugs’ safety and efficacy.

From day one of the Oroville spillway crisis in February, the California Department of Water Resources has never wavered in its declarations that, despite the disintegration of the massive concrete flood control outlet — and a near-disaster caused by uncontrolled emergency reservoir flows down a rapidly eroding hillside — the stability of the massive dam itself was not and has never been threatened.

What the aye-aye and the woodpecker can tell us about how evolution works

Sep 3, 2017

Is the evolution of particular traits predictable or random? Or put it this way: If we rewound the tape on Earth’s history and started life over again from the very beginning, would the same animals — even humans — still emerge?

The sweet stories of fake fruit flavors

Sep 3, 2017

What do icy cherry popsicles, sweet grape sodas and sticky banana taffy have in common?

For one, we don’t expect them to taste much like the real fruits they’re meant to mimic — but their artificial flavors are familiar and intense, all the same. Where did these fake fruit flavors come from, and why, in 2017, do they still taste so little like the real thing?

How to make biometric technology more secure

Sep 2, 2017

Fingerprint scanners now come standard on most new smartphones, and some devices even feature iris scanners and 2-D facial recognition technology. But with every new step forward in biometrics, it seems a way to “spoof” the technology follows soon behind — from fingerprint replicas to high-resolution photographs of faces and eyes. So, what’s on the horizon in biometric security, and how can we make the technology more secure?

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