National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

Millennials have now surpassed baby boomers as America’s largest living generation. That makes those in the 20-36 age range a driving force behind shopping trends. But it’s what millennials are not buying that caught our attention.

David Lackey is an appraiser on the long-running PBS series “Antiques Roadshow.” At his shop in an upscale neighborhood in Houston, Lackey said the market for antique furniture is down.

When is it OK to ask children to translate for their parents in emergency situations? That’s a question law enforcement agencies are wrestling with more and more. That’s because 18.5 million children in the U.S.

GoDaddy drops neo-Nazi site Daily Stormer

Aug 15, 2017

Protests against this weekend's white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, continue to crop up in cities across the country. And they're also happening online.

Daily Stormer, which describes itself as "The World's Most Genocidal Republican Website," has been let go from the domain GoDaddy after posting personal attacks about Heather Heyer, one of the Charlottesville victims. On today's show, we'll look at the role that services like GoDaddy play in controlling internet content. Afterwards, we'll look at a growing debate over the manufacturing standards for environmentally friendly electronics.

Two more high-profile CEOs — including Intel's Brian Krzanich and Under Armour's Kevin Plank — have resigned from President Trump's manufacturing advisory council. On today's show, we'll look at how businesses are responding to this weekend's violence in Virginia. Afterwards, we'll talk about the possibility that the U.S. will place tariffs on foreign-made solar panels, and then discuss the controversy over allowing children to translate for their parents in emergency situations.

What it was like that day in Charlottesville

Aug 14, 2017
Lidia Jean Kott 

I knew that things in Charlottesville were going to be intense, but I still was not prepared for what I saw when I drove into town early Saturday morning.

We parked behind a McDonald's and then walked towards the park where the main protest and counterprotest was happening. On our way, we encountered a group of people carrying a huge wooden sign that read, “There is no master race."

I tried to take a picture of them, but they waved me off. Later, I saw them on TV, using the sign as both a shield and a weapon when the fighting got intense.

Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

If you’ve been talking to people about hate crimes since the election, like I have, you’d know that Charlottesville didn’t come out of nowhere. People have been priming for a fight for months.

The string of hate crimes across the country has people scared, defensive, a little paranoid, and preoccupied with their own safety. And when President Donald Trump initially failed to condemn white supremacists in Charlottesville, instead saying there was violence “on many sides,” that wasn’t surprising either — because there’s a long history of American failure to acknowledge white hate. 

The US far-right is a fan of — Syria's Assad?

Aug 14, 2017

President Bashar al-Assad of Syria has some unlikely fans in the US among far-right communities.

In a video that was posted on Twitter, three men who took part in the Charlottesville protests talk about their support for Assad, the notorious Syrian leader accused of killing thousands of his own people. One of the men is wearing a T-shirt that reads “Bashar’s Barrel Delivery Co.”

"Support the Syrian Arab army," one of them says.

Edgar Su/Reuters

Throughout much of history, witnessing a total solar eclipse would mean one thing above all else. And that is fear.  

For the ancient Greeks, an eclipse was a sign that the gods were angry. The Vikings saw eclipses as a potential apocalypse. And the ancient Chinese apparently believed that an eclipse meant that a giant dragon was trying to devour the sun and that people needed to make as much noise as possible to scare the dragon away.

Can Netflix afford more big gets like Shonda Rhimes?

Aug 14, 2017

Netflix, the big video on demand company, committed what amounts to a raid on the content stable of Disney. It has signed a multiyear production contract with Shonda Rhimes —creator of hit TV series such as "Grey’s Anatomy" and "Scandal." With more than 50 original shows under its belt just this year, Netflix is doubling down on the old notion that content is king. However, creating shows costs a lot of money, and with $20 billion in debt already, how many more shows can Netflix bankroll?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Think about the hardest negotiation you’ve ever done — maybe over a salary or buying a house. Maybe some big deal at work. Those are like the simplest kiddie-puzzles compared with the 5,000 piece jigsaw that is a trade negotiation. Then, imagine you had to start all over once it was done, and maybe add in a few extra pieces this time around. Trade negotiators from the United States, Mexico and Canada will meet in Washington, D.C., this week to begin trying to update the North American Free Trade Agreement. Former trade negotiators let us in on the process. 

An ode to network TV with the creator of "This Is Us"

Aug 14, 2017

Before there was Netflix, or HBO, or cable, or streaming television of any kind, there were networks and seasons of TV that fed water-cooler conversation because everyone was watching the same shows. Now the television landscape is much more spread out, but that doesn't mean a network show can't still capture the public's attention. NBC's "This Is Us" averaged 15 million viewers a week last year and racked up a list of Emmy nominations for its first season, including outstanding drama series.

Update, 8/16/17: President Trump disbanded both his manufacturing council and his Strategy and Policy Forum in a tweet Wednesday morning. Several more CEOs left the council before and after. The updated story is below.

At a White House event on Monday, President Trump explicitly condemned white supremacists and neo-Nazis after facing increasing pressure to rebuke the hate groups responsible for the outbreak of violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. 

A job isn’t always just a job – sometimes it is a way of life. This story is part of a series exploring what it means when jobs define several generations and are part of the very fabric of a community.

On some days, students at the Harpswell Coastal Academy don’t even see a classroom. Behind the school, sixth-grader Easton Dundore shovels mulch into an outdoor hoop house he helped design with a few other students.

As investigations continue into whether ExxonMobil misled investors by failing to report its own scientists’ predictions about global warming, the company and other fossil fuel titans are being challenged on another legal front.

The villain in James Patterson’s new book seems strangely familiar…

Aug 14, 2017

James Patterson may have pulled inspiration from a very public disagreement he had with online retailer Amazon for his latest novel.

Seeing how we've started this program more than once with a tweet from the chief executive, we'll start today with a tweet from a chief executive. Pharmaceutical CEO Kenneth Frazier was a member of President Trump's Manufacturing Council until this morning. He announced his resignation on Twitter, citing Trump's belated response to the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend. Trump responded with two searing tweets Monday about drug prices.

NASA is testing supercomputers to send to Mars

Aug 14, 2017

Scientists in space have computers, but they don't exactly look like the one you might be reading this on. Computers in space have highly specific functions. There is no consumer-grade Mac or PC up in space. A lot of that has the do with the fact that laptops in space degrade quickly out there.

But NASA wants to fix that problem by creating new supercomputers, developed in partnership with Hewlett Packard Enterprise. The technology is being tested on the International Space Station in hopes that the computer can withstand trips to Mars. 

08/14/2017: Countering domestic terrorism

Aug 14, 2017

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has called Saturday's deadly car attack in Charlottesville an act of domestic terrorism. On today's show, we'll chat with Faiza Patel from NYU's Brennan Center for Justice about how the government tries to combat violent extremism. Afterwards, we'll discuss Uruguay's attempt to draft a measure that would provide transgender people with reparations.

NEW YORK (AP) — The CEO of the nation's third largest pharmaceutical company resigned from a manufacturing council that advises President Donald Trump days after racially tinged clashes in Charlottesville, Virginia, citing "a responsibility to take a stand against intolerance and extremism.''

The conversation is continuing into this week over what happened in Charlottesville, Virginia. There are now questions about the future of one set of federal programs established under the Obama administration to target homegrown extremism called Countering Violent Extremism (CVE).

Sandra Valin, who is transgender, was born in 1974 and said growing up in Uruguay, her mom wouldn't allow her to leave home alone.

"When I was a kid I was a target because I was flamboyant and feminine, it was horrible, and it didn't end with the dictatorship - the persecution continued into the 1990s," Valin said.

Effectively cut out of Uruguay's formal economy, Valin relied on sex work to survive.

Who owns the seeds bought by farmers and gardeners?

Aug 14, 2017

The seeds planted by farmers and gardeners used to be in the public domain. But then, in the 1980s, new laws and court rulings made it easier to patent them.

A survey on Americans and their workplaces by RAND, the nonprofit think tank, shows a lot of us work in high-pressure, stressful environments and don’t have enough time to get the job done, so we have to take it home with us.

08/14/2017: Weaponized audio technology

Aug 14, 2017

Hewlett Packard Enterprise has developed a Spaceborne computer that'll be tested at the International Space Station to see if it can withstand trips to Mars. Mark Fernandez, lead developer for the NASA project, joined us to talk about the technology and why a private company like HP is getting involved. Afterwards, we'll look at news that State Department workers in Cuba may have suffered from an "acoustic attack." 

A rally planned by white nationalist groups ultimately led to violent clashes and the death of an anti-racist protestor, Heather Heyer, this weekend. One federal effort to target domestic terrorism, the Countering Violent Extremism program, had been set up by the Obama administration. But recent changes under the Trump administration have raised questions about the program's future. On today's show, we'll take a look at what the program does and what might change.

Alan Alda's secret to better communication? Have a little more empathy.

Aug 13, 2017
<a href="https://www.pexels.com/photo/marketing-man-person-communication-362/">Gratisography</a>/<a href="https://www.pexels.com/photo-license/">CC0</a>.

Actor Alan Alda is on a mission to help scientists make their research more relatable to the public. He even co-founded an organization at New York’s Stony Brook University, the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, to get the message out.

What’s your game plan for the Great American Eclipse?

Aug 13, 2017
<a href="https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4518">Ernie Wright/NASA&rsquo;s Scientific Visualization Studio</a>

If you’re reading this in the United States, you’re perfectly positioned for a dazzling glimpse of the solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21.

In the US, the total eclipse will cross 14 states from Oregon to South Carolina, and, according to NASA, a partial eclipse will be visible across North America and parts of South America, Africa and Europe.

Mark your calendar: Aug. 21 is the Great American Eclipse.

Slowing the symptoms of Alzheimer’s by helping patients relearn lost skills

Aug 12, 2017
<a href="https://www.pexels.com/u/matthiaszomer/">Matthias Zomer</a>/<a href="https://www.pexels.com/photo-license/">CC BY 2.0 (image cropped)</a>&nbsp;

For people with Alzheimer’s, the disease brings a gradual, devastating loss of ability to manage basic daily needs — a decline known as retrogenesis. First, patients lose higher planning functions, then skills like money management and then simpler skills like dressing and bathing.

Drugs can slow this decline, but new research has pinpointed an approach that could stall the slide even further: pairing medication with supportive care to help patients relearn basic skills. The findings were presented in July at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in London.

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