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Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

Two women from South Africa who joined forces to stop a secret nuclear power deal between South Africa and Russia are among the seven recipients of this year’s Goldman Environmental Prize.

The prize recognizes individuals who have stood up to vested interests, corruption, industry bullying and political repression to protect their communities and the environment. It is awarded to activists in each inhabited region of the world.

It’s tough to be in the processed food business these days. The abrupt departure of the Campbell’s CEO after a bad quarterly earnings report highlights how difficult it is for these companies to shift their identities, with consumers seeking foods they consider healthier. How are processed food companies responding?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

There’s been a little bit of confusion these past couple days on how trade talks with China are going. U.S. officials told CNN that China had offered to bump up purchases of American goods by $200 billion. Chinese officials said that's not true. The Trump administration believes that the trade deficit with China could be brought down if China were to buy that much more worth of American goods. It’s something the president is focused on even though most economists say he shouldn't be. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

What happens when three big companies invest in an apology? Facebook, Uber and Wells Fargo have launched apology campaigns in the past several weeks. They’re all trying to regain the trust of their customers for scandals that have included data hacking, sexual harassment, and overcharging. But is an "I’m Sorry" ad effective?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

It was the middle of April when they showed up at the border, covered in mud. Ana, eight months pregnant, accompanied by her 4-year-old daughter, had just crossed the Rio Grande into Texas.

“We didn’t have shoes on, we stood there in our socks,” she says.

There are 28 other monarchies in the world

May 18, 2018

The world has been consumed by royal wedding fever, as is customary when the British royals do, well, anything. Prince Harry, sixth in line to the throne, is set to marry American actress Meghan Markle on Saturday in a lavish ceremony at Windsor Castle. 

With so much attention on them, one could be forgiven for not realizing there are actually many other royal families around the world. They’re in charge of 28 monarchies overseeing 29 countries, from absolute monarchies, such as Vatican City and Brunei, to constitutional democracies like those in most of Europe.  

Given his history using offensive language, it has become hard for President Donald Trump to make headlines simply for what he said. Yet on Wednesday, he did just that by referring to a group of immigrants as “animals” during a roundtable discussion about immigration policy in California.

“These aren't people,” Trump said on record. “These are animals and we're taking them out of the country at a level at a rate that's never happened before. And because of the weak laws, they come in fast. We get 'em. We release 'em. We get 'em again. We bring them out. It's crazy.”

So, what's going on with trade again?

May 18, 2018

We're talking NAFTA. We're also talking tariffs. And China. And trade deficits. Leigh Gallagher from Fortune Magazine and Dion Rabouin from Yahoo Finance join us for the Weekly Wrap to talk about the unforeseen consequences of U.S. trade policy and the latest on the 10-year Treasury note. Also on today's show, we get into the Trump administration's attempt to get China to buy more goods from the United States. Trump wants to lower the trade deficit with Beijing, but is buying more American goods going to solve the problem? We also take a look at apology ads.

Recommended reading for recent college grads

May 18, 2018

(Markets Edition) The Trump administration plans to propose a new rule that would bar abortions at facilities that receive federal family planning funds. On today's show, we'll look at what this could mean for organizations like Planned Parenthood. Afterwards, amid news that the U.S. benchmark interest rate eased back a bit this morning, we'll discuss whether this is cause for alarm. And then to cap off today's show, we'll talk about the best personal finance books for recent college graduates. (05/18/2018)

Globalization has been touted as this inevitable, unstoppable force. But as the U.S., China and other major economies flex their muscles over trade, is this assumption all wrong?America has a long history of global trade and a varied one. Our economy has swung widely from protecting our very first industries with subsidies and imports to brokering global deals that open borders and lift trade barriers. It's not pure economics that dictates our trade relationships; it's politics and social context, too. Who’s gained from open borders and who's lost?

A new survey out this morning of mobility in the American workforce finds that one in four job applicants would move to a new city for a new job, a higher salary or better career opportunities. The online employment site Glassdoor found that younger workers and men were more likely than others to relocate to a new metro area, especially those in software engineering, developers and data scientists. And where are they moving to?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Land accounts for 80 percent of farm assets according to the Department of Agriculture. So farmers are using their land as collateral to face low commodity prices, but the amount of production that farmers need to service their debt is rising. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

It's tough out there for farmers

May 18, 2018

(U.S. Edition) The U.S. and China are hard at it to work out a trade agreement. One potential idea floating around: a $200 billion trade surplus package from Beijing. We'll chat with a former Treasury Department official about how big this offer is in the grand scheme of things. Afterwards, we'll look at the financial troubles many farms in the U.S. are facing. Many are using their land as collateral against loans to keep operating. (05/18/2018)

China drops U.S. trade probe

May 18, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... There are signs that the frosty trade relationship between the U.S. and China is thawing. Beijing has dropped a sanctions probe into American sorghum imports. But is this olive branch a sign that China will fulfill a promise to open its economy? We ask trade expert David Collins. Then, the bunting is out, the weather looks clear. Yes, it's finally here. Prince Harry will marry Meghan Markle this weekend at Windsor Castle. We speak to some of those involved in the celebrations.

The best personal finance books for recent college grads

May 18, 2018

If you’re getting your college grad a gift of money, you might want to include a book on how to put that present to good use. Financial planning might not be a priority — 70 percent of grads are finishing school with significant debt. But with U.S. employers adding an average of 200,000 jobs per month in 2018, your grad could be working — and doing some financial planning — soon.

Here are some personal finance books for grads recommended by Marketplace senior economics contributor Chris Farrell, keeping in mind economics and English majors alike.  

The Senate voted earlier this week to overturn the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to roll back net neutrality rules. But in order for the FCC’s decision to be reversed, a similar vote would have to pass the house and be signed by the president. But the vote did accomplish one big thing: It reminded politicians that consumers care about net neutrality and support some kind of regulation on big telecom companies. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Brian Fung of the Washington Post about what he learned from senators after the vote.  

Did our lack of trust in Big Cable sway the net neutrality vote?

May 18, 2018

The Senate voted earlier this week to overturn the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to roll back net neutrality rules. But in order for the FCC’s decision to be reversed, a similar vote would have to pass the house and be signed by the president. But the vote did accomplish one big thing: It reminded politicians that consumers care about net neutrality and support some kind of regulation on big telecom companies. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Brian Fung of the Washington Post about what he learned from senators after the vote.

The drama just keeps coming at CBS and Viacom

May 17, 2018

CBS lost today’s court battle for independence from its majority shareholder, National Amusements, Inc. But the saga between CBS and the parent company of Viacom is far from over, and it comes at a time when the entire media landscape is on the verge of being upended by mergers.  

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Labor shortage = labor shortage

May 17, 2018

The latest birth rate numbers are out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Americans, you are not being fruitful and multiplying. Last year saw the lowest number of births in 30 years. That dearth of babies has a lot of repercussions for the future — a smaller active labor force would mean less economic growth. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Animal artists

May 17, 2018

What separates humans from animals? It used to be tools — and then we found out some animals are pretty handy. But what about art?

There may be nothing prettier than birdsong, but each species sings pretty much the same tune. Are animals ever really creative? Sean Cole went looking for animal artists and found a dog painter and an orchestra of elephants.

(Originally aired June 30, 2006)


From Studio 360 ©2017 PRI 

Laika's dream

May 17, 2018

A month after Sputnik went up in 1957, the Soviets launched a another satellite, Sputnik 2, with a very famous passenger: Laika, a mutt from the streets of Moscow.

She never made it home.

The writer John Haskell has this tribute, part fact and part fiction, to the canine cosmonaut. A version of this story appears in his book, “I Am Not Jackson Pollock.

(Originally aired October 5, 2007)


From Studio 360 ©2017 PRI 

Who’s a good audience? You are! Yes, you are!

May 17, 2018

Multimedia artist Laurie Anderson was speaking to cellist Yo-Yo Ma one day when they discovered they had a shared fantasy — they sometimes imagine their audiences are made up entirely of dogs.

Anderson set out to make that a reality. Beginning with a performance at the Sydney Opera House in 2010, she began staging Concerts for Dogs (and their human owners). She initially thought only a handful would show up ... but the canine crowd was in the thousands.

The jazz musician Charles Mingus was a celebrated band leader and one of the most important composers of his generation.

But at the same time he was recording “The Greatest Jazz Concert Ever” with Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker, he was working on another masterpiece. He figured out how to get his cat, Nightlife, to poop in a toilet — and he decided he’d share his method with the world.

The 2015 film “White God” is not your average dog movie. This is no “Homeward Bound” or “Old Yeller,” in which the central dog character is all warm and fuzzy. Instead, the lead canine turns vicious and becomes downright antagonistic toward humans.

Training a dog to “act” this way, within a span of four months and with 250 other Hungarian street dogs, is a tough job.

How do you take the perfect dog portrait? The Dogist has you covered.

May 17, 2018

Friedman is a dog photographer — or, more accurately, he’s the human behind the blog and online phenomenon The Dogist. The idea for the site ­came to him a few years ago, when he realized that there was nothing like Humans of New York or The Sartorialist for dogs. It was a glaring hole on the internet, he thought, and one that he could fill.

Royal wedding boosts the fashion industry

May 17, 2018

Britain’s tabloid press has been in a ferment over this weekend’s much-heralded royal wedding. What the journalists initially dubbed the “Markle Sparkle,” they then attacked as the “Markle Debacle” following the revelation that the bride’s father, Thomas Markle, will not be walking her down the aisle, citing health problems. Doubts about his attendance first surfaced after it was alleged that he was paid for staging photos with journalists. If true, that would break an unwritten rule that members of the royal family must not profit financially from their association with the monarchy.

Ask a Manager: Navigating an internship

May 17, 2018

Summer is rapidly approaching, and with it, a slew of seasonal jobs and internships. Internships have become a rite of passage for many young professionals on the verge of entering the workforce and a gateway to a career.

But internships can also be problematic — they are often unpaid, or underpaid. Those who take internships forgo other work opportunities in favor of experience, a choice many can't afford to make.

The median household income in Texas oil country – the Permian Basin - is consistently among the highest in the country at almost $70,000. But not everyone is making that kind of money. Ask people in Midland about the underserved and homeless population, they’ll almost immediately talk about the different boards they’re on and the work their church does to help the less fortunate. And almost everyone agrees they don’t want the state taking their money to help do something they’re perfectly capable of and willing to do. But is it enough? 

We've heard of AIPAC, but where are the Palestinian lobby groups?

May 17, 2018

The American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), the pro-Israeli lobbying group in Washington, have been in the headlines all week long, with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaking before them on Monday. The focus has been on how much influence the Israeli lobbying group has over Washington and whether J-Street, the more moderate Israeli lobbying group, may give President Obama a chance to push back against Israel and Netanyahu. But why aren't we seeing more Palestinian lobbying groups?


The Markle Effect

May 17, 2018

We're just a couple days away from the royal wedding, and the fashion industry loves Meghan Markle. We'll look at her style and how it might change once she marries Prince Harry. But first, let's talk about the Newtonian law of global trade: For every policy action, there's an equal or opposite reaction. Japan could reportedly be taking the United States to the World Trade Organization over steel and aluminum tariffs, and we'll spend some time at the top of today's show exploring trade's many unintended consequences.

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