National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

What happened to the moon’s magnetic field?

Sep 2, 2017

The moon doesn’t have a magnetosphere, unlike Earth. The protective bubble shields our upper atmosphere from solar wind — and, it's what makes compasses point north. But billions of years ago, scientists say, the moon did have its own magnetic field. 

REVEAL Fundraiser Episode Fall 2017

Sep 1, 2017

For the 2017 fall fundraising season, here are three of our favorite Reveal stories from this year.

The perfect storm

Sep 1, 2017

Harvey brought unprecedented rain and destruction to Houston Texas, and it will likely take years for the city to recover. In the aftermath of the storm, we get an eyewitness account of what residents are experiencing from Reveal’s Neena Satija. Then we revisit her earlier reporting about Houston’s vulnerability to hurricanes and rain. In 2008, Hurricane Ike swept through Texas, and resulted in billions of dollars in damages. But it could have been much worse. Just like Harvey, that storm turned at the last minute and didn't hit Houston head on.

Trump's Arpaio pardon draws bipartisan criticism

Aug 28, 2017
Brian Snyder/Reuters file photo

Late last month, former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio was convicted by a federal judge of criminal contempt. The judge ruled that Arpaio had deliberately ignored a 2011 federal injunction to stop racially profiling Latinos, which stemmed from a class action lawsuit.

How much is President Donald Trump worth? And is he or anyone in his administration profiting from their positions? Reveal is teaming up with the Center for Public Integrity to investigate those questions. We’ve created a database listing all the assets that members of his administration have disclosed. Now we’re digging through those documents to see whether there are any conflicts of interest. We’ve posted the information online, and we’re asking the public to take part in our investigation. Citizen sleuths already have uncovered some leads.

Of global warming, plastic waste and velociraptors

Aug 26, 2017
Wikimedia Commons/CC BY-SA 4.0

What do these three things have in common: the Earth’s temperature, waste from plastic products and velociraptors?

Answer: not much. Except they were all recently in the news and all are really interesting, or disturbing, depending on your point of view.

First: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NOAA, declared the first six months of 2017 the second warmest on record, just behind 2016’s all-time record. Why is this news? Because climate scientists had expected temperatures to cool down, and they haven’t much.

Jonathan Drake/Reuters

Here's a question many of us have been debating since the deadly protests in Charlottesville last weekend: What should be done with a monument dedicated to a Confederate figure? Should it be taken down? Or should it be recontextualized? 

It's a question similar to one Paraguayans had to answer not long ago. The debate in that South American country revolved around a statue of longtime dictator General Alfredo Stroessner.

Wiki Commons

It didn’t take President Donald Trump long to condemn the terror attack in Barcelona on Thursday. But his follow-up tweet has raised some serious eyebrows among historians, veterans, human rights groups and counterterrorism experts:

Why did ISIS target Spain? The answer may lie in history.

Aug 18, 2017
Sergio Perez

On Thursday, a van ran over pedestrians on Barcelona’s Las Ramblas strip. It took a very short time for ISIS to claim responsibility for the attack.

At least 13 people died and around 100 people were injured.

But why did ISIS target Spain, now, for practically the first time? 

Related: See all the terrorist attacks around the world from 2016

There could be many answers to this question.

The aftermath of the deadly attacks in Barcelona

Aug 18, 2017

Thousands of people marched to the Plaça de Catalunya in Barcelona Friday, chanting “I'm not afraid” in Catalan. It was a show of solidarity after a series of terrorist attacks claimed by ISIS rocked Spain. About 14 people were killed and several more were injured in the tourist-heavy Las Ramblas area of Barcelona when a van plowed into pedestrians. Liz Castro, a writer and longtime resident of Barcelona, witnessed the march on Friday.

Joshua Roberts/Reuters 

Peter didn’t want to use his real name because he’s afraid of becoming a target for white nationalists.

He was one of the counter-protesters in Charlottesville on Saturday — the ones President Donald Trump on Tuesday referred to as “very violent” and “charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs.”

I first reached out to Peter in July, over Skype, when I was doing research on a movement called antifa, short for anti-fascist.

Beloved Yemeni activist abducted by government security

Aug 18, 2017

You've seen and heard Hisham al-Omeisy. The friendly Yemeni observer who has told news services around the world about conditions in his war-ravaged country was abducted by three carloads of armed men in Sanaa on Monday afternoon. He is being held at the government's National Security Bureau in the Yemeni capital. 

In the wake of the protests by neo-Nazis and white supremacists that turned deadly in Charlottesville, Virginia, President Donald Trump has come under fire for not immediately and clearly condemning American racists. It’s not the first time. Trump and those close to him have often played down the threat of violence committed by white supremacists across the country. This week, through interviews with key Trump supporters and advisers, we explore if we should have seen Charlottesville coming and if we should expect more race-based clashes on the way.

Brenna Daldorph

On Saturday, Aug. 12, four days after Kenya’s elections, Octopizzo had some tea with his cousin Oloo in Nairobi. Octopizzo is a well-known hip-hop artist in Kenya. When the cousins were done, Octo walked Oloo to a taxi stage where he could get a boda boda — a motorcycle taxi — back home to Kibera, the slum where they both grew up.

Octopizzo went home and flicked on the news.

Andrea Crossan/PRI

We just finished our POSITIVE series — stories of women and girls under the age of 24 living with HIV in South Africa. We called our Series POSITIVE not only because it centers on the stories of HIV-positive women and girls, but also because it was important to us to highlight stories of people who do not see such a diagnosis as an ending.

Doing the math on back-to-school tax breaks

Aug 18, 2017

Last week on the show, we talked a lot about the costs associated with school: the cost of sending kids back to school, the cost of teacher supplies and the cost of a poor education.

Rachel Abrams of The New York Times and Cardiff Garcia of FT Alphaville join us to discuss the week's business and economics news. On Friday, Stephen Bannon was pushed out of his role as chief strategist to president Donald Trump. We discuss what the move can mean for the markets. Also, we recap Trump’s stance on the violence in Charlottesville. With Trump alienating corporate America and Republicans admonishing him, can the White House withstand the latest political whiplash thrown its way?

The cargo shipping industry is turning things around

Aug 18, 2017

After the Great Recession, the cargo shipping industry overestimated how fast the consumer economy would bounce back. It’s been a tough few years, with empty space on many cargo ships that carry furniture, clothes and office supplies — pretty much all the stuff Americans buy in stories. But now, old ships are getting replaced with a fewer number of new, bigger vessels, owned by fewer companies. All that efficiency has freight rates climbing.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

China’s government today unveiled new rules for overseas investments by Chinese businesses. The rules discourage companies from what are called "irrational" acquisitions of assets in industries ranging from real estate to hotels and entertainment.  In recent years, China has invested heavily in the U.S. What will the new rules mean for U.S. businesses?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Back in the mid-2000s, when producer Roy Lee was pitching an American remake of the Japanese horror film “Ju-On: The Grudge,” the original movie didn’t even have English subtitles. In order to shop it around, he and his team inserted their own subtitles based on what they thought was happening in the movie.

“I remember there was a meeting with the original director [Takashi Shimizu] where people were asking him about the storyline, and he had no idea what they were talking about, because we had gotten some of the details wrong,” says Lee.

Greenbelt, Maryland, can't hide its town pride

Aug 18, 2017

The U.S. government tried a different approach to public housing during the great depression by creating entire towns that were federally planned and subsidized. The idea was to build communities where poor Americans and displaced farmers could work. Only three of these "greenbelt towns" were built before the project ended. But those three towns still stand today as a reminder of the New Deal's history.

There is a lot of debate around office etiquette. In the past, Marketplace Weekend has spoken with Ask A Manager's Alison Green about the right way to handle job interviews and how to dress for the office. Now we're taking on the topic of kids at work. Is it ever appropriate?

Having a diverse workplace is a worthy investment

Aug 18, 2017

It may feel like the topic of diversity in the workplace pops up all the time. So many industries seem to struggle with it — Hollywood, media, Silicon Valley.

Coal under Trump: one miner’s perspective

Aug 18, 2017

At 11 p.m. on a recent Friday night, the West Elk Mine outside Somerset opened its gates. Cars and trucks started rolling out, signalling the end of a coal mining shift in this rural pocket of Colorado.

Workers had been opening up a new section of the mine 4 or 5 miles underground, a tough job made tougher considering that the current economics of the coal industry means fewer workers at the mine.

Coal under Trump: one miner’s perspective

Aug 18, 2017

At 11 p.m. on a recent Friday night, the West Elk Mine outside Somerset opened its gates. Cars and trucks started rolling out, signalling the end of a coal mining shift in this rural pocket of Colorado.

Workers had been opening up a new section of the mine 4 or 5 miles underground, a tough job made tougher considering that the current economics of the coal industry means fewer workers at the mine.

08/18/2017: Life in a "New Deal Utopia."

Aug 18, 2017

Steve Bannon has joined the list of recent White House departures, and with that, the prospect of a trade war with China got a little less likely. And that's good, because in spite of all the real economic competition between the world's two largest economies, they need each other. To that end: Beijing put out some new rules on overseas investments today, specifically limits on certain kinds of foreign acquisitions by Chinese companies. We'll talk about what that means. Then: During the Great Depression, the government started an experiment.

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