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Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

Marketplace

The Samsung Galaxy S8 hits stores today, with its makers hoping it'll make you forget about the iPhone and that other Samsung phone with exploding batteries. Geoffrey Fowler, personal tech columnist for the Wall Street Journal, stopped by tell us all about the new device's features, and how it compares with Apple's products. Afterwards, we'll check out the rise of tech in Phoenix, Arizona, and then play this week's Silicon Tally with NASA's Daniel Lockney, whose job includes helping NASA technology find uses in places here on earth. 

Marketplace staff

German police today arrested a 28-year-old man known as Sergej W. in connection with explosions last week that targeted a German soccer team's bus. The possible motive: an elaborate scheme to manipulate a stock.

Authorities are now saying the incident has no extremist connection. Two people were hurt during the April 11 attack, including a player with shrapnel wounds.

US President Donald Trump hasn't won any friends in South Korea this week.

A firestorm has erupted on South Korean social media after Trump said during an interview with The Wall Street Journal, “Korea actually used to be a part of China.”

The Wall Street Journal published the story on April 12, but it gained traction in South Korea this week.

An official with the foreign ministry in Seoul responded Wednesday by saying the Trump comment was “historically untrue” and “not worthy of a response.”

Zaidee Stavely

A colorful mural on the wall at the University of California, Davis’ immigration law clinic shows letters from immigrants behind bars and chains turning into quetzal birds: a metaphor for the students' work.

Chicano studies students painted the mural and “chose the quetzal over the dove because it represents freedom,” explains the clinic's co-director, Holly Cooper. “In the Mayan mythology it’s believed that if a quetzal is brought into a cage, it will die.”

Rebecca Rosman

After his father died when he was only a teenager, Yassine Mazzout started working nights at the landfill next to his home near Morocco’s capital Rabat, salvaging items that could be recycled or sold from the mountain of filth.

“At 15, I should have spent my evenings playing with other kids,” said Mazzout. “But I spent all of my free time [at the landfill] to make money for my family.”

Amy Bracken 

On a bright Sunday morning, the Suchiate River bustles with makeshift rafts loaded with people. It’s a popular place to cross from Guatemala to Mexico. And crossing is easy. There’s no wall, and no border patrol in sight.

It's known as Paso del Coyote, or “Coyote Pass.” 

Luis Fernando Pérez operates a raft here, and for years he’s brought across passengers — and migrants, many from Central America.

But lately he’s seen a change.

Jason Redmond/Reuters

The Trump administration has been a huge windfall for the private prison industry. Two of the largest companies have seen their stock price more than double since Trump’s election in November.

But private detention centers are also taking a hit in the courts and in the media.

Peter Pereira

The traffic blockade was ready. The vans and buses were standing by. The agents told the mayor and the Department of Social Services. And then they stormed the factory.

It was March 6, 2007, in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Immigration officials raided the Michael Bianco leather factory, a defense contractor that hired hundreds of undocumented workers to sew belts and backpacks for the US military.

The agents arrested 362 workers, most of whom were deported to Guatemala.

Delray Beach Police Department/WLRN

The man had just risen from the dead.

He’s in his mid-20s. Sitting on a couch, pale as a ghost, sweaty, wide-eyed, disoriented — like he had just woken up from a nightmare.

“What happened?” asks Delray Beach Police Department Sgt. Ed McCabe.

“I guess ... I overdosed,” the man says.

The man’s roommates found him unconscious and he was turning blue, not breathing. He was overdosing on heroin. They pulled out two auto-injectors of naloxone — an overdose reversal drug — and jabbed them into his thigh.

He came to.

“How much did you use?” asks McCabe.

I just copied your boss on this email

Apr 20, 2017
Jana Kasperkevic

It’s no secret that workplaces can feel like a battlefield. There are workers competing for the same promotion. People worried about whether their boss likes them or whether a co-worker is secretly taking credit for their hard work or ideas. Then there are all those emails to decode and consider.

There is one exception, however. The dreaded boss cc. Everyone knows exactly what it means — your co-worker wants your boss to be privy to your conversation.

Elijah Nouvelage/Reuters

Some day in the future, you’ll hail a cab, then a few minutes later, a driverless, autonomous vehicle will pull up to the curb.

You’ll hop into the back seat and off you go, leaving the driving to the computer.

Not so fast.

Driverless cars are indeed coming. Automakers are already road testing them in select US cities with standby drivers ready to take control of the steering wheel if anything goes haywire.

The last time The World talked with Irish singer Imelda May, she had a rockabilly look and sound. But now, six years later, that's all gone.

"As you get older you change. And as a woman you change," she says. "I had a child, been married forever and then getting divorced and things change. And I just felt that wasn't me anymore."

Even as the White House rolls back national climate change programs, California is moving forward on a cap-and-trade system to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Yet the Golden State still has some of the highest air pollution in the nation from other pollutants its industrial plants spew. A new bill would use California’s cap-and-trade rules to regulate those toxins, too.     

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Marketplace

“On est chez nous!” The phrase, which means “this is our home,” thunders around a sports stadium in northeastern Paris. Some 6,000 supporters of the far-right National Front party are in full cry at a campaign rally as they await the arrival of their heroine, the leader of their party and a front-runner in France’s presidential election, Marine Le Pen.

“On est chez nous” is a battle cry for the National Front and conveys two connected messages: “We have too many immigrants coming to France” and “We don’t like the European Union running our country.”

Why would Google want to block its own ads?

Apr 20, 2017

The Wall Street Journal is reporting, according to unnamed sources, that Google plans to introduce an ad-blocking feature on its Chrome web browser. Yes, that Google. The one that makes a lot of money selling those ads. So why would it want to make it easier for users to escape them?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Why a steel tariff could hurt instead of help

Apr 20, 2017

President Trump could sign an executive order tomorrow triggering an investigation into competition in the steel industry. That in turn could lead to new tariffs on foreign steel. The idea would be to protect the U.S. steel industry, but often the imposition of tariffs can lead to unintended consequences.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Kai Ryssdal

This has been a relatively low-key week in Washington. Congress has been on recess and the president has been in and out of town. Left behind have been staffers at agencies and offices that do the work that helps the government work, among them the Congressional Budget Office and its director, Keith Hall. Hall and the CBO were most recently in the news during the debate and eventual collapse of the health care bill.

Edgard Garrido/Reuters

Missing San Diego activist Hugo Castro has received medical attention and is stable after being found wounded Tuesday on a street called Avenida San Rafael in Tlalnepantla de Baz, a city in the State of Mexico, Mexico's attorney general said in a press release.

Investigators at the office of the special prosecutor for disappeared persons had received an anonymous phone call describing his location.

Marketplace staff

Bill O'Reilly, despite denying that he sexually harassed co-workers, is out from Fox as a cable TV host amid pressure from protesters and advertisers. And there might also be international business pressures on its parent company, 21st Century Fox, that factored into the decision. 

The Bank Black movement gains traction

Apr 20, 2017
Marielle Segarra

Last July, Teri Williams was out of the office, helping her daughter move into a new apartment, when she started getting frantic phone calls. Williams is the president of Boston-based OneUnited Bank, the largest black-owned bank in the country, with $650 million in assets. Her employees were calling to tell her that people were swarming the bank.

“They were coming into the branches,” Williams said. “They were lined up outside the branches. They were calling.”

04/20/2017: Frexit?

Apr 20, 2017
Marketplace

This has been a relatively low-key week in Washington, politics-wise. Congress has been on recess and the president has been in and out of town. Left behind have been staffers at agencies and offices that do the work that helps the government work, among them the Congressional Budget Office and its director, Keith Hall. The CBO and it analysis work were thrown in the spotlight during the recent healthcare debate and non-vote. We'll talk with Hall about all of it.

The Fed occasionally interviews people in each of the 12 regions it presides over to gauge how they're feeling about the economy. The results are in and people are feeling, well, uncertain. Diane Swonk, CEO of DS Economics, joined us to talk about why there may be a lack of widespread optimism. Afterwards, we'll look at the positive effects of attending college full time vs. part time, and then discuss how automation puts workers of color at risk. 

Only about 40 percent of community college students earn a degree within six years. But students who go to class full time are much more likely to graduate. A new study finds that even one semester of full-time attendance makes a difference. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Allison Keyes

Five years ago, Marketplace explored how machines, robots and software algorithms were increasingly entering the workforce in our series "Robots Ate My Job." Now, we're looking at what humans can do about it with a new journey to find robot-proof jobs.

04/20/2017: The evolution of the show 'Archer'

Apr 20, 2017
Marketplace

This week, we've been looking at communities all over the country that are trying to become the next big tech hub. What's one region waiting for talent to come to town? Philadelphia. Archna Sahay, the director of entrepreneurial investment for the city, joined us to talk about whether there's enough venture capital to go around. Afterwards, we'll look at how the animated FXX sitcom "Archer" came of age along with the internet.

Marketplace

Fox has fired Bill O'Reilly amid sexual harassment claims against the TV host. Bad publicity, of course, can matter a lot when it comes to corporate decisions like these. We'll recap some of the events leading up to the ousting, which include the departure of more than 50 advertisers, and look at a big financial deal in Europe that may have influenced the move. Next, we'll examine a new study that finds it can make a huge difference if a person attends community college full-time.

How a second screen can give new life to TV shows

Apr 20, 2017
Bruce Johnson

The animated FX show "Archer" is a sitcom about a spy, and it has a loyal following online. It’s in its eighth season, and it has a new app that uses augmented reality, letting fans watch the show on their smartphones and learn new information.

The app stems from the show’s many literary references and inside jokes, which have been analyzed in depth by people on the internet.

Russia's new scapegoats

Apr 19, 2017

Reveal exposes what it's really like to be gay in Russia and neighboring countries today, where hateful rhetoric against the LGBT community appears on a daily basis on TV and out of the mouths of politicians. We trace the roots of the anti-gay movement and show how President Vladimir Putin uses this agenda to quash political dissent, exert influence on neighboring nations and bash the West.

Russia's new scapegoats

Apr 19, 2017

A Russian journalist is murdered in St. Petersburg – not for what he’s reported, but for being gay. Reveal exposes what it's really like to be gay in Russia and neighboring countries today, where hateful rhetoric against the LGBT community appears on a daily basis on TV and out of the mouths of politicians. Reveal traces the roots of the anti-gay movement and shows how President Vladimir Putin uses this agenda to quash political dissent, exert influence on neighboring nations and bash the West.

Caren Firouz/Reuters

In Pakistan, the lynching of a journalism student by classmates over alleged blasphemy offenses has caused national soul-searching. 

At the start of this year, Mashal Khan was a 23-year-old with his whole future ahead of him. He was known for having a liberal outlook, including relatively secular views on religion and society. Those views had already made him unpopular on the campus of the Abdul Wali Khan University, in the city of Mardan, where he studied journalism, according to other students the BBC interviewed.

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